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How hard is CRNA

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by Dgardella Dgardella (New) New

Hi! My goal is to be a crna. Im still a high school senior so i dont have much info on all of the requirements to be a crna. I plan on going to a community college and getting an associate degree on nursing and then go for my two next years to get a BSN. After i plan on going for my masters and enter a nurse anesthetist program. Am i right here? Or am i missing something that i have to do? Also how hard is the whole process education wise? I love math but not so much science cus my high school teachers havent been the greatest but i still want to go through it. Any advice?

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

It's very tough to become a CRNA. This is a fact that I (and any other potential patient) am very grateful for.

CRNA programs are uber-competitive. In addition to stellar cumulative GPA, you will need 2 years of high-level ICU nursing experience. Many programs prefer CCRN (critical care) certification as well. You won't be able to work while in CRNA school, so you'll need to make sure you are in good shape financially and sock away some $ to live on. At the end of your education, you'll have to pass a rigorous examination to be awarded your CRNA. If this is your goal, it's going to be a fairly long process.

Best wishes to you.

Excellent reply by HouTx, just wanted to add-- CRNA is required to be a doctorate degree by the year 2022. I see you mentioned obtaining a master's degree. Great job doing your research while still in high school.

GeauxJoe

Has 3 years experience.

I'm currently in CRNA school and took a path close to what you described. I obtained my ADN then worked as an RN while I took online classes to get my BSN. All the while I got a job in the ICU got my experience and got into CRNA school. As HouTx mentioned it was very competitive getting into school and the schooling itself is very hard. You mentioned not liking science... Science is the backbone of our job. Chemistry, anatomy and physiology and biology are the major subjects that anesthesia is based on. Another thing is that most CRNA schools specifically look at your science GPA to see how well you do in those particular areas. As with your case I hope it was just your teachers and you do have a soft spot for science because it is a very important subject for CRNA's. Let me know if I can be of any more assistance.

One more thing, it would be unnecessary to obtain your masters degree because all you need is a BSN to get into CRNA school. You will receive your advanced degree once your graduate from CRNA school wether it be a master's or a doctorate, depending on which program you attend.

You mentioned not liking science... Science is the backbone of our job. Chemistry, anatomy and physiology and biology are the major subjects that anesthesia is based on. Another thing is that most CRNA schools specifically look at your science GPA to see how well you do in those particular areas. As with your case I hope it was just your teachers and you do have a soft spot for science.

Hey! Thank you for replying! So since I'm getting financial aid which will cover most of my tuition and housing at California State University Long Beach i am considering going straight for my bachelors instead of going through a ADN first. I'll still have to take about $2000 in loans each year to pay the remaining of my housing cost. When i applied i chose speech pathology as my major so to change it i would have to wait till orientation. Do i have a chance here at being able to change toprw-nursing? Their STEM index thing for the nursing program is 3300 and i have 3780 (all based of sat and my high school gpa). Im scared i wont get accepered into the pre nursing program and end up losing the chance to study what i want!

And integards to the the science thing, i am 100% determined to not quit and stay with nursing so i hope im able to get theough with it!

malenurse69, MSN, NP

Specializes in ICU / Urgent Care. Has 5 years experience.

Easy there tiger, one step at a time. It's okay to have goals, but don't let them fool you into a false sense of security. First worry about finishing off high school strong, then getting into college. Now worry about doing well in your prerequisite classes to get into nursing school.

Once you're in nursing school, worry about doing well in each class, as a graduate education, especially CRNA, requires high grades. You graduated from nursing school? Congratulations, now you have a vague idea of the the different nursing fields that are available to you. Now pass your NCLEX, and hopefully you've done some interviews at this point to potentially secure yourself a golden ticket into an ICU. You'll come to find even the ICU isn't a one trick pony, there's many different kinds! Neuro, cardiac, medical, oh the variety! Maybe you'll even become passionate about a certain population or organ system (Hey some people really love the patho of hearts or brains, don't judge.)

You managed to get into a super competitive field known as the ICU after graduation? Fantastic, now finish your residency that generally takes 1-2 years based on the institution. You will be trained and monitored closely, no pressure (haha). Don't forget your specialty certification that almost every CRNA program requires (CCRN), which is no cakewalk to say the least.

You've spent two years of your life learning your specialty, filling in any gaps in your resume with needed classes, increasing your GPA if you slacked some during school? Great! Now it's time to massage your resume to fit the requirements of as many schools in-state as possible (Hey, costs a lot less!) As said previously, it's uber competitive, requires solid grades, great interview skills, and you'll be assessed all around as a viable candidate (No pressure!)

What's this? You got acceptance letters? Fantastic, now pick your school of choice (or lack of,) and prepare to be an SRNA for 27-32 months that will make everything I said before this seem like middle school recess.

Good luck

You managed to get into a super competitive field known as the ICU after graduation? Fantastic, now finish your residency that generally takes 1-2 years based on the institution. You will be trained and monitored closely, no pressure (haha). Don't forget your specialty certification that almost every CRNA program requires (CCRN), which is no cakewalk to say the least.

You've spent two years of your life learning your specialty, filling in any gaps in your resume with needed classes, increasing your GPA if you slacked some during school? Great! Now it's time to massage your resume to fit the requirements of as many schools in-state as possible (Hey, costs a lot less!) As said previously, it's uber competitive, requires solid grades, great interview skills, and you'll be assessed all around as a viable candidate (No pressure!)

What's this? You got acceptance letters? Fantastic, now pick your school of choice (or lack of,) and prepare to be an SRNA for 27-32 months that will make everything I said before this seem like middle school recess.

Good luck

Ok wait hold up now im beyond confused here! :( so what i thought was that after doing my bachelors in nursing and passing the NCLEX, i would have to get a job in ICU, and work in ICU for like 2 years and then get into the CRNA? The ICU is that classes too or is that me getting a job in ICU. Then you said i wouls be spedning two years leading my specialty.. I thought CRNA would be my soecialty.. Would i be doing ICU somewhere else or is that also a school thing?? Please help!

GeauxJoe

Has 3 years experience.

Everything malenurse69 said was spot on! No the ICU isn't classes but you should be learning as much as possible about what your doing there. He also mentioned that you should try to get your CCRN. Which is Critical Care Registered Nurse. It is an extra certification you can obtain while working in the ICU that basically says I'm really good at what I do! CRNA school's look up to that!

windsurfer8, BSN

Specializes in Psych/Military Nursing. Has 14 years experience.

If you won't do something because it is "hard" then CRNA is not for you. First graduate HS and get into Nursing school. If you complete that with at least a 3.5 GPA then worry about CRNA. That is PLENTY for now.