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Hopefull LNP student in a couple years, what can I study?

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Hello Im currently taking cna classes. In a couple years my youngest son will be in school and I plan on starting school for my LPN license. My question is what can I be studying until then? I called the school I plan on going to and asked if they could tell me what book they were teaching out of. Kinda showed my ignorance lol. They said they have more than 16 they teach out of! I know you have to maintain a 81 average to stay in the course, and I have heard horror stories of people getting far into the program and be cut for making an 80! So I want to use some spare time until them learning what I can. Any suggestions on what to study to get a heads up books ect??

While waiting to hear if I got accepted into a program, I read books on Medical Terminology (you probably know most of it, being a CNA), Medical Mathmatics, Pharm, and Labs.

Best wishes!

you will need to take an anatomy class, English class, pharmacology class,math class, cpr/first aid class, psychology class, medical terminology class for most LPN programs.

Most of those classes will need to be completed before you enter the program if you attend a local community college. The general education classes above you can start taking these classes now online.

Does the school that you are interested in attending have a website that you can go to view the classes or prerequisites you would have to take before you can apply to the program? If so I would start taking those classes so that you will be prepared and ready when your child starts school.

Good Luck!!!

jelorde37

Specializes in LTC, cardiac, ortho rehab.

while i was in the lvn program a lot of my friends ended up getting cut because of low grades. they were bright people but i think procastination and laziness was what caused them to fail. i know your excited about starting the program and thats good, but take it easy and have some fun while you still can because the program is tough. if you want to get started early though, i suggest reading chabners medical terminology book because it goes over medical terminology, basic Anatomy and physiology, deficits, as well as lab procedures and treatments that go with the deficits. so when the lpn program comes along, youll have some knowledge regarding whatever your studying. good luck and congrats on choosing to be a nurse.

Hello Im currently taking cna classes. In a couple years my youngest son will be in school and I plan on starting school for my LPN license. My question is what can I be studying until then? I called the school I plan on going to and asked if they could tell me what book they were teaching out of. Kinda showed my ignorance lol. They said they have more than 16 they teach out of! I know you have to maintain a 81 average to stay in the course, and I have heard horror stories of people getting far into the program and be cut for making an 80! So I want to use some spare time until them learning what I can. Any suggestions on what to study to get a heads up books ect??

Why not look into a part time Lpn program now, instead of waiting a few years to go to LPN school? I have four children, but I'm going to a part time program being that it is easier for me to attend 2-3 days a week for two years than a 5 day a week program for 1 year. In my area, part time LPN programs are offered during the day or as an evening/weekend program.

Good luck to you,

Marci

xNursePinkx2b

Specializes in CNA; LPN Student.

you will need to take an anatomy class, English class, pharmacology class,math class, cpr/first aid class, psychology class, medical terminology class for most LPN programs.

Most of those classes will need to be completed before you enter the program if you attend a local community college. The general education classes above you can start taking these classes now online.

Does the school that you are interested in attending have a website that you can go to view the classes or prerequisites you would have to take before you can apply to the program? If so I would start taking those classes so that you will be prepared and ready when your child starts school.

Good Luck!!!

I think your thinking of an RN program. Most LPN programs don't have pre-reqs. A & P, Pharm, and all that are integrated into the course, thats why it's such a tough program!

lvlissl2ebecca

Specializes in geriatrics.

I was in an accelerated course, so it may be a bit different. My advice to you is to learn every part of the anatomy.. (i.e.. where the patella, clavicle and different bones are..) along with the major organs and deffinetly study circulation through the heart and lungs. I would try to get a drug book and look at the different drugs and their side effects. Learn the classes of drugs. Learn anything and everything you can about nursing procedures etc. The internet is a good recourse. I wish I had done some early preparing, would have made everything so much easier. It will really help you if you learn these things before hand..that way when they come up in class.. it's more of a refresher than some overwhelming new thing. Good luck.

I think your thinking of an RN program. Most LPN programs don't have pre-reqs. A & P, Pharm, and all that are integrated into the course, thats why it's such a tough program!

No, I am not thinking of an RN program. Where I am there is a local community college that has an lpn program. Most of the classes I mentioned were a prerequisite to the program. The only classes that were integrated was pharmacology and medical terminology. The others you had to take before entering the program.

The original poster asked what she could be studying for the lpn program while she waits. Each program is different, so I was just letting her know what classes she can expect to take from my own personal experience. My program was 12 months so I guess that is why you had to have prereqs done.

I think your thinking of an RN program. Most LPN programs don't have pre-reqs. A & P, Pharm, and all that are integrated into the course, thats why it's such a tough program!

I start my LPN program 9/4 & thet had pre-reqs. Actually all of those things were required with a C or better. That is why I am retaking A & P 1 b/c I got a C-! My instructor & I just didn't see eye to eye...:uhoh3:

Bridey

Specializes in Ortho Rehab, LTC, Med-Surg, Telemetry.

My best advice is to speak with an advisor at the college you intend to enroll at. Let them know you want to go into the LPN/LVN program within the next few years. Ask what pre-req's are required before admittance. Most places REQUIRE a few pre-req's.

If you plan on waiting 2 yrs before you start the actual program, you might as well be taking a class or 2 a semester and lighten your load for when you get into the program. Plus if you decide to go on to an RN program you'll have less required courses to take.

Woodenpug, BSN

Specializes in MPCU.

The NCLEX-pn review books can be helpful guides to find which areas will be most difficult for you. You can then select relevant courses.

Thanks for all the great advice! The school I plan on attending doesnt have any Pre Req.

Now there is another school in the area and they have you take a butt load of prereqs. The course is 1 year. you have to maintain a 81 to continue through. I was thinking of buying the LPN study book. Maybe a A&P guide too. The place where Im taking cna classes will be offering phlebotomy classes next month I was thinking of taking that too, in a few months just to get the experience. If I get a better paying job drawing blood that can be a plus right.

Bridey

Specializes in Ortho Rehab, LTC, Med-Surg, Telemetry.

Wow that's unusual. Most schools have at least a few general ed requirements. Are you planning on going to a Vocational School?

Anyhow, I think you have the right idea. Definately get some things to study on your own. A & P is a good start. And getting certified as a phlebotomist will get your foot in the door of more opportunities.

I have found that the "Incredibly Easy" series of books published by Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins have been super helpful for refreshers. They cover everything from "Labs made Incredibly Easy" to "Dosage Calculations made Incredibly Easy" to "Nursing Pharmacology made

Incredibly Easy", etc. The books are easy to read & follow... they have little quizzes/tests inside at the end of each chapter and they aren't too terribly expensive (you can find them used for very little). Definately worth a look. Something else to consider is a Care Plan companion/Health Assessment book... while LVN/LPN's don't often do initial care plans, knowing how to put all of those skills to use is definately a huge help.

You're welcome!

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

No, I am not thinking of an RN program. Where I am there is a local community college that has an lpn program. Most of the classes I mentioned were a prerequisite to the program. The only classes that were integrated was pharmacology and medical terminology. The others you had to take before entering the program.

The original poster asked what she could be studying for the lpn program while she waits. Each program is different, so I was just letting her know what classes she can expect to take from my own personal experience. My program was 12 months so I guess that is why you had to have prereqs done.

Mine required pre-requisites because it is a bridge program. As others have stated, get a book on anatomy, pharmacology and fundamentals of nursing. You can order older editions for dirt cheap on Amazon.com, or borrow them from the library. I do think it is best to study a bit early. If you will be taking a difficult course like anatomy on a college level, it is nothing to sneeze at. But, for now, I would get an essential anatomy book or Anatomy and Physiology for Dummies. A book like that may not be as deep as what you will take, but you may be able to comprehend the basics and build from there.

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

Wow that's unusual. Most schools have at least a few general ed requirements. Are you planning on going to a Vocational School?

Anyhow, I think you have the right idea. Definately get some things to study on your own. A & P is a good start. And getting certified as a phlebotomist will get your foot in the door of more opportunities.

I have found that the "Incredibly Easy" series of books published by Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins have been super helpful for refreshers. They cover everything from "Labs made Incredibly Easy" to "Dosage Calculations made Incredibly Easy" to "Nursing Pharmacology made

Incredibly Easy", etc. The books are easy to read & follow... they have little quizzes/tests inside at the end of each chapter and they aren't too terribly expensive (you can find them used for very little). Definately worth a look. Something else to consider is a Care Plan companion/Health Assessment book... while LVN/LPN's don't often do initial care plans, knowing how to put all of those skills to use is definately a huge help.

You're welcome!

Yeah, I had practically every "Incredibly Easy" book myself. They did help through nursing school. I gave them all away after I graduated.

ExAirBagRN

Specializes in Labor and Delivery, Med/Surg-tele. Has 6 years experience.

I am currently enrolled in an LPN program and feel fortunate that working in a hospital has put me ahead of the curve.

If you don't work in a hospital, volunteering can be a great way to gain insight as to if you even want to pursue nursing.

I agree with Bridey- see a counselor at the school you plan on attending, they will give you great advice.

Good luck!

Dawn

Any of the NCLEX-LP books are excellent. You will have to thoroughly study at least one of these books prior to taking your NCLEX exam.

My favorite is Saunder's NCLEX-PN. :yeahthat: You need to do all of the quesitons on the desk and the questions in the back of each chapter. Mosby's NCLEX-PN is good too and the Incredibly Easy NCLEX-PN is very good.

The Incredibly Easy Series of books are fabulously clear in presentation and I highly recommend them for clarification on any topic!

Best of Luck to you,

Nurse Smiley

If you go to a private school like concorde or Bryman you dont need those but in a jr college in california you need prereqs. I couldnt get into the LVN program because i didnt take the prereqs for there program i took my prereqs for RN which is A&P microbiology, pshych, child dev, english and math.

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