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by SeanSilver SeanSilver (New) New

I'm about to start nursing school soon and I'm very excited! I have two questions, how much does an RN get paid ( including bonuses, etc ) and would it ever be awkward that I'm a male? Thanks!

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

Male nurses are great.

Bonuses are not common.

Pay varies widely depending on where you live and level of experience.

What are raises like? Would it be wise to consider being a nurse practitioner?

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Moved to student nursing

neuron

Has 5 years experience.

I'm about to start nursing school soon and I'm very excited! I have two questions, how much does an RN get paid ( including bonuses, etc ) and would it ever be awkward that I'm a male? Thanks!

I really believe nursing is becoming more 'unisex' meaning it is not male nor female. A lot of what nurses do are 'traditionally' male. Setting I.V. pumps, calculating dosages, setting up O2 and nebulizer machines (if portable)..,etc.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

If making tons of money is your goal, you probably do not want to go into nursing. It can pay reasonably well, though few are getting rich and it comes at a very high emotional and physical cost. The liability far outweighs the compensation.

It is a pretty well known fact in the nursing world that raises are hard to come by without switching jobs.

hooliebug, BSN, RN

Has 1 years experience.

Male nurses are awesome and I love them. I wish there were more of them. Don't let the fact that you're male and loved by your coworkers get to your head though.

In my area (KC MO), new graduates start out making $15 above the minimum wage, which is not a small amount of money. Many nurses are quick to tell us students that there isn't any "good money" in nursing but my starting salary won't exactly poverty-level wages or anything, so... there you go. Raises and bonuses and such aren't guaranteed but your future employer should be upfront about that sort of thing when you start working. Do your research.

I'd only consider becoming a nurse practitioner if you actually want to become a nurse practitioner; yes, you can make more money, but your future patients probably won't be super keen on having a healthcare provider that only cares about dollar signs and not their well-being.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 44 years experience.

You jumped through all the hoops to get into nursing school without having taken the time to research your two VERY basic questions? Did you just throw a dart to decide on a career?