Help! I need to quit my first nursing job after 3 months

Posted
by meggers13 meggers13 (New) New

So I started my first nursing job in May at a neuro rehab. Which is mainly traumatic brain injuries. It was my first offer and I jumped on it. The center is incredibly short staffed. Short on nurses and short on cnas. I am the only nurse since I started to complete orientation with out quitting. On my third day of orientation I was left to care for 8 patients all on my own. Mind you I am fresh out of school. Out of my five weeks of "orientation" I was with a "preceptor" maybe 5 times, if that. I feel like I learned nothing, and when I voiced this concern to the nurse educator she told me I would learn everything when I was off orientation and they couldn't extend my orientation. Since being off orientation I have up to 16 patients. I feel completely over whelmed and my anxiety has been the worst its ever been. I constantly feel that working in this center is jeopardizing my nursing license. There are way more horrible things to say about where I work but this post would be pages long. I went to my primary care and explained the situation he advised that I should quit and he put me on an anxiety med. I had a bad reaction to it and was out of work for several days. The day I went back I was informed that because I was out id have to pick up shifts and work doubles and everyone was so cold to me. The next day before work I had such a bad anxiety attack my husband brought me to the ER. There the doctor put me on a two week medical leave and recommended I get a note from my primary care stating I can no longer work there for medical reasons. I refuse to go back to work there. My concern is will a note from my primary care effect me getting another job? Or will quitting with out a two week notice effect me more?

Alicia777

Alicia777, MSN, NP

Specializes in Surgery. 312 Posts

Sounds awful. Agree on getting out but I would really recommend trying to leave professionally and give two weeks. I would be worried a 'medical leave' from a job could cause you problems getting the next job.

Speak to your boss and HR candidly about why you are leaving so soon; that you don't feel like it's safe situation for your patients or for you professionally.

Your next position ask questions regarding your mentorship and be honest about what you're looking for and why your previous position didn't work out.

Good luck!!

Oceanpacific

Oceanpacific

Specializes in Infection Prevention, Public Health. Has 33 years experience. 204 Posts

The job is killing you. Don't go back and suffer any more. Plus I would imagine they have guessed that you will not be back. Don't worry about the medical note thing and don't volunteer it to a new employer.

Oceanpacific

Oceanpacific

Specializes in Infection Prevention, Public Health. Has 33 years experience. 204 Posts

Sorry, missed a big piece. DO NOT give them a note saying you are medically unable to work. Just say you are leaving the position because it does not provide you with the support you need as a new nurse. Don't try to claim Workers Compensation. Just resign and move forward.

Edited by Oceanpacific
Typo

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 10 years experience. 3,069 Posts

I started as a brand new RN on an ortho rehab unit. After 3 1/2 years, I just floated to a neuro/spine unit and I was nervous. I can't imagine how you feel!!!!! If you are and RN, you need to give 30 days. Like PP said, be careful about the reasons you are leaving. I would talk to HR and see if you can work out something so you can leave "eligible for rehire" Nursing is an incredibly small world.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 12 years experience. 1 Article; 13,951 Posts

Providing such a note to your present employer may result in them reporting you to the BoN as unfit to practice nursing. You do not want to go down that road, more so if you provide your employer with evidence that you are not safe to practice as a nurse from your physician. Something to consider.

Just give two weeks notice and resign due to lack of orientation. Start searching for a new job.

odaat

odaat

Specializes in ER, Med/Surg, Telemetry, Dialysis. Has 4 years experience. 101 Posts

Providing such a note to your present employer may result in them reporting you to the BoN as unfit to practice nursing. You do not want to go down that road, more so if you provide your employer with evidence that you are not safe to practice as a nurse from your physician. Something to consider.

Just give two weeks notice and resign due to lack of orientation. Start searching for a new job.

I was getting ready to post the same thing, completely agree! Keep your reason very private.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,823 Posts

This is not a neuro rehab.. this is a huge money making scam. You are on a medical leave, use it to give your 2 week notice.

Just hand in your resignation, your health is worth more than those bozos. Future employers will recognize said bozos, and cut you some slack.

meggers13

meggers13

2 Posts

I don't want to try to claim workers compensation I just want to leave their on good terms with out having to go back.

Oceanpacific

Oceanpacific

Specializes in Infection Prevention, Public Health. Has 33 years experience. 204 Posts

I don't want to try to claim workers compensation I just want to leave their on good terms with out having to go back.

I didn't think you were going that way. It's just that I think it is so important that you do NOT give them any information which suggests you are medically/ mentally unable to practice. You are just having a normal reaction to a truly horrible situation. This job is one of the few situations in which I would recommend that you do not return to work for the sake of giving adequate notice. Send a lovely note expressing your appreciation for the opportunity to work there, but, as a new graduate you do not feel you can give safe care with the patient load you are expected to cover

So, worst case scenario is that they get angry, won't give a reference, etc. No worries. I think most future employers, if they ask about this, will be fine if you briefly describe the number of patients you were expected to care for. Don't mention the anxiety attacks requiring medical treatment.

Be done with this horrible place and put them in your rear view mirror. Someday you will look back at this and say, " You wouldn't believe the crazy set up they had at my very first nursing job ". You can stop and breathe easy now. Good luck to you.

Edited by Oceanpacific
Typo

Oceanpacific

Oceanpacific

Specializes in Infection Prevention, Public Health. Has 33 years experience. 204 Posts

I pretty much agree with you. However, I think this employer is so desperate that they are likely to try to get her to come back in some really underhanded way; like saying she will be with another RN when they have no intention or ability to provide that support