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HELP! Don't know what to do.

lucyrdgz lucyrdgz (New) New

Hello nurses and students!

I'm new here, and I have a question regarding my next steps. A little background: I attended a community college and got my AA in Nursing. I received NO HELP afterwards of what my next steps are. Fast forward, 3 years later I'm still just an AA in Nursing degree holder. I don't know what to do, what to apply to, and if I can get my bachelors in Nursing before doing my NCLEX? I'm really confused and I'm interested in furthering my education and passion in nursing.

On 7/24/2020 at 4:27 PM, Lucydog14 said:

Have you not taken the NCLEX?

No, I wasn't told what my next steps were, and then I had a big move, so I never furthered my research. Should that be my next step?

amoLucia specializes in LTC.

Wait! You haven't NCLEX yet and you're talking about BSN?

Where was your school's academic counseling/guidance office in all this?

So you're NOT working as a nurse but have an 'interest in further education and nsg passion'? You've waited 3 years?

 I don't see where your interest in pursuing a working nsg career exists.

RebelNurse has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN.

Hi there! I'm not sure what state you live in or where you'd want to work as an RN, but in Michigan, RNs at the bedside/hospital usually have to have a BSN, or commit to getting it within 5 years of hire. I would say, especially having 3 years off, it would be smart to look into doing an associate to bachelors degree program before taking NCLEX. Or, if you'd rather, you could study super hard, take your NCLEX, and look into jobs that are willing to hire an RN with associates. Sometimes these employers will help you get your BSN, and the programs for RN (w/ associates) to BSN are quicker than a typical BSN program. Hope this helps!

17 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

Wait! You haven't NCLEX yet and you're talking about BSN?

Where was your school's academic counseling/guidance office in all this?

So you're NOT working as a nurse but have an 'interest in further education and nsg passion'? You've waited 3 years?

 I don't see where your interest in pursuing a working nsg career exists.

as I stated above I was planning a big move (state wise), then I had to wait for 1 year to get state residency, and then I got pregnant. stuff happens, I will not accept you judging me. Help me don't judge me.

10 minutes ago, RebelNurse said:

Hi there! I'm not sure what state you live in or where you'd want to work as an RN, but in Michigan, RNs at the bedside/hospital usually have to have a BSN, or commit to getting it within 5 years of hire. I would say, especially having 3 years off, it would be smart to look into doing an associate to bachelors degree program before taking NCLEX. Or, if you'd rather, you could study super hard, take your NCLEX, and look into jobs that are willing to hire an RN with associates. Sometimes these employers will help you get your BSN, and the programs for RN (w/ associates) to BSN are quicker than a typical BSN program. Hope this helps!

THANK YOU! This information is very helpful. I reside in Texas. I will look into the associates to bachelors program before NCLEX. I want to be well prepared. 

 

RebelNurse has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN.

Of course! NCLEX is a big challenge, and I really think going back to school would be a very wise choice to get started. It'll help you focus on what you think you're weakest in when you're studying for the big test! Best of luck to you!! 🙂 

Just now, RebelNurse said:

Of course! NCLEX is a big challenge, and I really think going back to school would be a very wise choice to get started. It'll help you focus on what you think you're weakest in when you're studying for the big test! Best of luck to you!! 🙂 

thank you! appreciate the kind words. ❤️ 

amoLucia specializes in LTC.

Sorry, I do understand where & when REAL life interferes with hoped-for lifeplans. Didn't catch that from your first post.

To me, it looks like your first step is to test. You might consider a study course if poss to help you prep for NCLEX. And start checking out employment options in your area.

Just know that you will most likely be considered an 'old new grad'. Happens to a lot of respondents here who no longer qualify for new nurse residencies & internships. Also be cognizant that you'll most likely benefit from an extended orientation period that some employers may shy from.

The longer you postpone NCLEX testing puts you further behind the curve competing with 'new' new grads. You NEED that license! And there are facilities that will hire AA grads - you may have to consider something as a plan B, even a plan C. It may just be a trade-off, something not so  glamorous for opp'ties like tuition benefits or scheduling.

Then the decisions re further schooling with advanced job positions can be viewed more concretely.

Good luck with your future journey.

 

Jedrnurse specializes in school nurse.

Most RN to BSN programs require you to have a nursing license to be admitted. Focus on the NCLEX and take it. The material covered in the RN to BSN programs are not oriented to help you pass it. For that you should hit and books and perhaps take a review course.

speedynurse specializes in ER.

1 minute ago, Jedrnurse said:

Most RN to BSN programs require you to have a nursing license to be admitted. Focus on the NCLEX and take it. The material covered in the RN to BSN programs are not oriented to help you pass it. For that you should hit and books and perhaps take a review course.

Yes - unless you want to start at ground zero with a 4 year bachelors program, then I also suggest taking the NCLEX first. That way you can go into an RN to BSN program - these programs require RN licensure. Also, most employers (hospital based) require BSNs and will pay for it. I have several other degrees and had no interest in paying out of pocket for a BSN. However my employer has prepaid my entire BSN program.

On 7/24/2020 at 5:29 PM, amoLucia said:

Sorry, I do understand where & when REAL life interferes with hoped-for lifeplans. Didn't catch that from your first post.

To me, it looks like your first step is to test. You might consider a study course if poss to help you prep for NCLEX. And start checking out employment options in your area.

Just know that you will most likely be considered an 'old new grad'. Happens to a lot of respondents here who no longer qualify for new nurse residencies & internships. Also be cognizant that you'll most likely benefit from an extended orientation period that some employers may shy from.

The longer you postpone NCLEX testing puts you further behind the curve competing with 'new' new grads. You NEED that license! And there are facilities that will hire AA grads - you may have to consider something as a plan B, even a plan C. It may just be a trade-off, something not so  glamorous for opp'ties like tuition benefits or scheduling.

Then the decisions re further schooling with advanced job positions can be viewed more concretely.

Good luck with your future journey.

So helpful!! Will definitely start doing my research, and get this process going. Thank you!

NRSKarenRN specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

First review the Texas Board of Nursing process for licensure exam requirements:  https://www.BON.texas.gov/licensure_examination.asp

Prepare for NCLEX exam. Allnurses NCLEX forum offers great advice that has helped many to pass the exams: https://allnurses.com/nursing-students-c132/  There are several websites  recommended in that forum to review anatomy/physiology, disease processes,  nursing procedures , and disaster triage --common topics on the NCLEX exam.

Later, check AN's  Resume https://allnurses.com/resume-advice-c192/ ; Job Search Assistance https://allnurses.com/job-search-assistance-c191/   and Interview forums  https://allnurses.com/job-interview-advice-c193/  for advice landing that first position.

Texas needs RN's for the foreseeable future due to the Coronavirus.   Develop an outline  of steps you need to take to reach your goals.  Plan one week at a time to tackle an item on the list,  try for 30min/day NCLEX prep study.  Check off each week what you've accomplished on your list.

Our members are here to support you,  Best wishes achieving the RN license.

Pay for and devote yourself to a good NCLEX review course. Get prepped and pass that NCLEX!

It seems to me like your next step, then, should be to look for an RN position. Take it from there as far as completing your BSN.

Good luck to you!

You may want to check on Texas eligibility requirements. For instance, Texas requires a Texas jurisprudential course. Also, I believe you have 4 years to take (and pass) the NCLEX.  

subee specializes in CRNA, Finally retired.

It would be wiser for you not to post using your real name.  

47 minutes ago, subee said:

It would be wiser for you not to post using your real name.  

thanks

dianah specializes in Cath Lab/Radiology.

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Katie82 specializes in Med Surg, Tele, PH, CM.

Start from the beginning. I think you'll need a refresher course before you take the NCLEX, because that is your first step. Doubt if you will be able to get into a topcap to BSN without being a RN, so get that done as soon as possible. How could this happen? All my school preached about during my 2-yr program is the NCLEX. What have you been doing for the past 3 years?

NRSKarenRN specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

3 hours ago, Katie82 said:

Start from the beginning. I think you'll need a refresher course before you take the NCLEX, because that is your first step.

Unfortunately, most Nursing refresher courses require active RN license so attendees can perform bedside care in a facility as part of refresher course.

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