Army Reserves - page 2

Hey everyone. I'm talking with a recruiter right now about joining the Army Reserves. He is a Captain that specializes only with medical people. Basically, they are offering me a commission as a... Read More

  1. by   NotNursy
    Andrew,
    I JUST joined the Army Reserves and I have to tell U that everything my recruiter told me so far has been true. Also everything is spelled out for you in the contract that you sign on the day of your "Oath Of Office". Just make sure you read what you sign (as always ). I did also just receive my bonus exactly as promised. My recruiter never told me I will not be deployed - on the contrary, he made sure I was aware of the possibility. Personally, I think of that in terms of when and not if. It took me a long time to finally decide to actually do this. Think of the worst thing that could possibly happen and if you think you can deal with that then go ahead and sign up. I've talked to quite a few RN's and CRNA's who are or were in the Army Reserves and the ones whose opinion matters to me have positive things to say about it. Take your time with this decision!
  2. by   Andrew, RN
    Thanks everyone for the support and helpful words. I am waiting on Letters of Recommendation from my previous employer and a date to get my physical.
  3. by   traumamike
    Congrats on your choice!! you will do fine.....Good luck!!
  4. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from lucky1RN
    :yeahthat:
    I'm also a veteran and would advise you to a) explore all your service options b) talk to some active duty nurses and c) GET IT IN WRITING (whatever your recruiter is promising you). You have to keep in mind that the military's needs will ALWAYS come first...I'm always wary of the promises not to deploy. If you're joining the military, get it in your head that you'll be gone 4-18 months at a time about every 2 years. If you can take that, then you'll be fine. Another thing to consider is the type of nursing experience your likely to get in each service. Last time I checked, the AF only had 5 medical centers left...I think they try to station new nurses at them. But if you don't, you could get stuck in a clinic...not so great for a new nurse.
    I'm pretty sure the AF Still offers a program similar to the one the Army recruiter is offering you. The AF was also recently offering $20,000 cash (before taxes) or $30,000 toward college loans for new grads. But you don't get both...if you take assistance during school, you don't get the bonus as well.
    FYI, there's an entire area of allnurses dedicated to military/VA nursing. Look under the specialty tab at the top. You might find some good info there.
    Good luck!
    Actually - you can get both in the USAF - the sign-on bonus and the loan repayment, you just have to sign for six years. I know this because that's what I've gotten.

    And this wasn't in this post, but it sort of gets to me so I feel compelled to say something: anyone who decides to enter the military - any branch, any level (active or reserve) - and doesn't once consider the fact that you will most certainly be deployed at some point needs to rethink their decision - BEFORE you even start listening to the lines recruiters will tell you. It's part of the deal - you swear to support and defend the Constitution, obey the lawful orders of those over you (and to only give lawful orders to those below you, should you be an officer), and this all includes the military's ultimate purpose: defense of the US and her allies, which can and right now does mean war.

    Flame away if you must - I assure you I can take it.
    Last edit by carolinapooh on Jul 22, '09
  5. by   jeckrn
    Agree with carolinapooh, when the 1st gulf war kicked off there was all kind of reservist from all services who could not believe that they where being activated. They went on the news etc. crying about having to leave their families etc. and said that the reserves was only to be 1 weekend a month, 2 weeks a year. Anytime that you are in the military, any branch, any status, you can execpt to deploy sometime during your career. It is best to plan for it. Deploying is easier on the service member then it is on the families since we know what we are doing and the families do not. Good luck on your choice. Like I tell everyone speak with all the services before you make up your mind to assure yourself that you choose the service that fits you the best.
  6. by   markisrn
    I am a STRAP officer, 1st LT, in the Army Reserve. It's a pretty sweet deal. I commissioned May 26th. My orders just came through this week so I should be getting my stipend checks pretty soon. They will be retroactive as of my commisioning date. As someone else said, it is 1900.00 or so monthly. My job is to finish my BSN, which I am doing online full time while I also work full time. I am pretty busy, but it is certainly doable to do both. As far as recruiters, some are better than others, but either way, always be on top of your own situation and don't wait for stuff to happen on its own. This is my second time in the Army, first being in the infantry, and I had one good recruiter, and one not so good. Also, if you start the process, be patient. It can be a slow road to get everything in line. I applied in Jan 09 and commissioned May 09. The main thing to ask yourself is "Is my primary goal to serve?" If the answer is yes, then you will put up with whatever is necessary to get here.
  7. by   Iworecords
    Flame away if you must - I assure you I can take it.[/quote]

    No flames here!!!!!!!!!!!! Too many potential military nurses -- looking at either the AD or the Reserves -- look only at the $$$$ and not the reality. If they sign their contract -- and then cash the checks -- they panic when the call comes. So many complain that their recruiters told them differently -- but if you are so naive to believe everything your recruiter tells you -- wellllllllllllllllllllllllllll -- I have a bridge in Brooklyn I want to sell..............
  8. by   Waiting_28
    My packet for the Reserves was at board this week. I too will be starting my BSN program this Fall through McKendree University in Lebanon, IL. It is accredited by the NLN. However, I finished my ADN this past Spring in May, took my boards June 18th, and passed. I have been working as an RN now for about a month. My ADN school (Rend Lake College) was a great school, with excellent staff. But, it was not accredited by the NLN. The board now says i'm not able to do the Reserves because of this. My recruiter, who is great, is working this but it is just frustrating, as it is one thing after the other. I don't see why this should matter one bit as my BSN school is accredited and I will not be activated until I hold my BSN degree, which will be August of 2010. Anyone ran into this issue before? Thanks!
  9. by   markisrn
    I agree with your logic and hope it works out for you. Don't give up, even if you have to wait for the BSN to be complete. By the way, I grew up in Benton and am quite familiar with RLC. It is a good school.
  10. by   Waiting_28
    Thank you for the kind remarks. My sister and her husband and children live in Benton. You are correct, RLC is a great school, with an excellent ADN program. Like you said, I will just wait it out and join after my BSN degree. Thanks again!
  11. by   prettyprettyRN
    Quote from NotNursy
    Andrew,
    I JUST joined the Army Reserves and I have to tell U that everything my recruiter told me so far has been true. Also everything is spelled out for you in the contract that you sign on the day of your "Oath Of Office". Just make sure you read what you sign (as always ). I did also just receive my bonus exactly as promised. My recruiter never told me I will not be deployed - on the contrary, he made sure I was aware of the possibility. Personally, I think of that in terms of when and not if. It took me a long time to finally decide to actually do this. Think of the worst thing that could possibly happen and if you think you can deal with that then go ahead and sign up. I've talked to quite a few RN's and CRNA's who are or were in the Army Reserves and the ones whose opinion matters to me have positive things to say about it. Take your time with this decision!

    NotNursy can you tell me some of the experiences your CRNA army reserves colleagues have told you about. Good and bad. Were they previoously in the military?
  12. by   Graduate2010
    Quote from markisrn
    I am a STRAP officer, 1st LT, in the Army Reserve. It's a pretty sweet deal. I commissioned May 26th. My orders just came through this week so I should be getting my stipend checks pretty soon. They will be retroactive as of my commisioning date. As someone else said, it is 1900.00 or so monthly. My job is to finish my BSN, which I am doing online full time while I also work full time. I am pretty busy, but it is certainly doable to do both. As far as recruiters, some are better than others, but either way, always be on top of your own situation and don't wait for stuff to happen on its own. This is my second time in the Army, first being in the infantry, and I had one good recruiter, and one not so good. Also, if you start the process, be patient. It can be a slow road to get everything in line. I applied in Jan 09 and commissioned May 09. The main thing to ask yourself is "Is my primary goal to serve?" If the answer is yes, then you will put up with whatever is necessary to get here.
    MarkisRN...hello Graduate2010 here. Since you are a Strap officer do you have to be a ADN-RN already prior to applying? Why doesn't the the Army recognize LPN-BSN programs as an alternate for becoming a BSN? Why only have RN-BSN the only option? I know plenty of people who are LPN's going straight for BSN programs because of how many they offer around the world now at 4 year colleges and hospital based nursing programs like here in Virginia.

    Another question for anyone....how long is BCT fif I choose to go in as a 68wm6 reservest? Is it 71/2 wks or 13 1/2 weeks. I would really like to not go through boot camp but I know the only way to not do BCT is going in the army reserves as an Officer, correct?


    Thanks in advanced!

    Stephanie
  13. by   markisrn
    Graduate 2010,

    You might consider getting yourself accepted into a college that has ROTC and Nursing. This will get your tuition paid and get you a commission. I think this may ultimately be a quicker route to BSN than getting your ADN, getting a direct commission.

    I am an ADN nurse who joined the reserves in the STRAP program and also have health care loan repayment. The ARMY will pay your previous loans as long as you keep them in good standing, keeping them deferred or never miss payments etc. They will pay up to 50,000. You most likely won't want to go in to the ARMY as an LPN because they don't recognize LPNs and you will end up a medic, which is OK if that is what you want, but it may get you deployed before you can consider going to school. Hope this helps.


    Mark

close