Got Fired Help Plz

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kdkout

kdkout, BSN, RN

Has 27 years experience. 155 Posts

You needed to be fired if this is what happened while you were on orientation. 
 

If you don’t know what you are doing, people can die. You were in over your head. Apply to easier jobs. 
 

I say this as a former patient and as a preceptor. 

Edited by kdkout

Rin nohara

Rin nohara

15 Posts

7 hours ago, kdkout said:

You needed to be fired if this is what happened while you were on orientation. 
 

If you don’t know what you are doing, people can die. You were in over your head. Apply to easier jobs. 
 

I say this as a former patient and as a preceptor. 

excuse me, Do I know you? Clearly you don't know  what happened! 

kdkout

kdkout, BSN, RN

Has 27 years experience. 155 Posts

On 6/22/2022 at 3:31 PM, Rin nohara said:

I never put my patient life in danger or anything like that. The problem is, I left work,  I did not chart anything on both of my patient because I was so busy. I didn't chart my assessment or note progress. 

Reread what happened. The problem is not your manager.  You are unable to recognize what a big deal this was.

This is ICU. You left without doing all of your major charting and are defending yourself by c/o about the manager and thinking that you didn't put anybody in danger.

You do not realize the gravity of the situation, which is a skill you need in nursing - especially ICU. 

If I did this, I would expect to be fired.  

Rin nohara

Rin nohara

15 Posts

I left because she told me to leave.  I got FIRED. did you want me stay while she clearly told me to go. both of my patients were stable.  I didn't know if I should stay and chart or leave. I was no longer welcome to stay  there any longer. she told me don't give report to my preceptor. it was more like coworker issue not med error or anything like that.

Edited by Rin nohara

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 29 years experience. 3,557 Posts

1 hour ago, Rin nohara said:

it was more like coworker issue not med error or anything like that.

I think that there's more going on than you realize or care to address. In this day and age where many areas are very desperate for nurses, it takes a lot to get fired. You're either missing something or not telling something. If you truly don't know why you got fired, I'd contact HR and just ask, perhaps you'll get an answer. Regardless, you need to do a bit of soul searching to determine the "whys"

kdkout

kdkout, BSN, RN

Has 27 years experience. 155 Posts

During orientation is often the only time you can somewhat “easily” fire a new employee, especially if it’s a union hospital. 


When I was a preceptor for the new grad program at a hospital approx. 7 years ago, we had to do a LOT to help each preceptee succeed; it cost about $40,000 to precept each one. I didn’t make this up; this is what I was told. It was a NICU setting. 

It sounds like this was the final straw moment, over several weeks of issues, and the manager/preceptor had enough and knew this was not a good fit. 

Not everyone is capable of every job, and that’s OK. 

I think part of the problem here is how this was comminuted but the OP. 

I understood it to mean she didn’t chart her stuff that day before being fired and told to leave. But, I can see how it could also be read as her having been hired for NOT charting. 

Maybe communication was a problem in this situation? If so, I still feel they should have been very clear with you about that. 

Davey Do

Specializes in Psych (25 years), Medical (15 years). Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 10,085 Posts

3 hours ago, K. Everly said:

 comminuted but  

Ouch.

On 7/1/2022 at 1:24 PM, Davey Do said:

Ouch.

LOL, thanks for pointing that out. Autocorrect is fun. I avoid contacting my boss by text on cell phone for this reason. 

Davey Do

Specializes in Psych (25 years), Medical (15 years). Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 10,085 Posts

14 minutes ago, K. Everly said:

LOL, thanks for pointing that out. Autocorrect is fun. I avoid contacting my boss by text on cell phone for this reason. 

 

It's like the nurse who texted the doctor after a successful PRN:

"Pt is doing well after porn given."

Delia37

Delia37, MSN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 15 years experience. 138 Posts

To the OP:

The fact you were told to leave the unit even before the end of your shift is very telling; I concur with other posters: either you are blissfully unaware of previous near missed/mistakes or we are not getting the whole story. Just because you are on orientation, does not mean your preceptor is not double checking everything you do (it is an expectation they report every "little mistake" during this period). Maybe that environment was not the right fit for you; if you need some closure, you can always ask HR to provide a written rationale for them letting you go. Please do some self reflection and use it as a learning experience moving forward.