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Getting hired from clinicals in Nevada

Students   (1,070 Views | 5 Replies)
by PrayingToPass PrayingToPass (Member)

4,758 Profile Views; 63 Posts

What experiences have you heard of where students get hired from a provider where they did their clinical training at? What set them apart from other new grads for entry level positions? :) Or what would impress you from a student training under you, enough to give them their first break in the biz?

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RunBabyRN has 2 years experience and specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

3,677 Posts; 27,052 Profile Views

I had an offer upon graduation (first in my class!), but it fell through due to some hospital politics and a decision not to take anyone from a traditional program (only wanted post-licensure), thanks to the CA BRN delay. The nurse manager had been on the med/surg unit where we spent the first 3 semesters, and knew who I was by the time we were done. When it came for preceptorship (final semester), I heard she was moving to one of my favorite units, and I ran into her, so I took my chances. She offered to help line up my preceptorship, and said, "and I'm known for hiring new grads, hint hint!" She lined me up with a great preceptor, I got along well with her nurses, and I busted my ass. I jumped in with both feet and never shied away from anything. I learned a ton. She offered me the job in March.

From what I've heard, a lot of new grads got completely screwed by that hospital this year. It sucks bad. Now there are a couple of new grad positions in other departments posted now, so I'm sure 4000 people will be applying for those (myself included), but the whole area has been bad for new grads.

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rob4546 has 6 years experience as a ADN, BSN and specializes in ICU.

1,005 Posts; 7,434 Profile Views

I cannot speak for Nevada, but I can tell you of my experience in my hometown. Before graduation I was asked to apply for a position in the surgical center. This unit is one of the most wanted places to work in this facility with a waiting list of current employees that want to transfer in. After graduation, and two days before I was to take the NCLEX, I get a phone call out of the blue to come in for a interview. It was just a meet and greet because I was not a nurse as of yet. I passed the NCLEX and got a congratulatory phone call that I passed and was asked to come in for a full interview. I was hired on the spot and was walking the floor 2 days later.

I am not the sharpest tool in the shed, but this is what I did during clinicals that set me apart from the others. I was always engaging, I never sat back and watched. Even if it was holding and handing flushes, IV Start kits, or any other supply for the nurse I was assigned to. I asked questions, even bad ones at times. I always wanted to know why. "Why did you chose to administer PRN drug XXX now? What was the deciding factor?" Stuff like that.

I kept my nurses' (and other nurses around me) rooms clean and prepped. To watch surgeries we had to have a consent signed by the surgeon and patient, I always took the lead and attained those signatures without assistance. I never took more time for lunch than given. I always went out of my way to say hello and introduce myself to the people that worked on the unit.

I guess the key is to be present, engaging, and professional. Others in my class were hired before me because they had their LPN and worked as an LPN, but I was the first in my class to work as an RN. Good luck and always do your best. People are always watching you during clinicals.

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THELIVINGWORST has 4 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Public Health.

1,381 Posts; 18,072 Profile Views

I'm in Vegas and I got my CNA job during my second semester of NS and then when I graduated they transferred me to RN. It was a lot easier to get in as an internal applicant as well.

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HouTx has 35 years experience as a BSN, MSN, EdD and specializes in Critical Care, Education.

9,051 Posts; 45,658 Profile Views

Maybe I am misunderstanding PP's post, but it is extremely common for hospitals to delay hiring a neg grad until s/he has passed NCLEX. When new grads are hired and then fail to pass NCLEX, it throws them into a limbo situation that is awkward and difficult for everyone. My apologies if this was not what is meant by "post licensure".

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RunBabyRN has 2 years experience and specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

3,677 Posts; 27,052 Profile Views

Maybe I am misunderstanding PP's post, but it is extremely common for hospitals to delay hiring a neg grad until s/he has passed NCLEX. When new grads are hired and then fail to pass NCLEX, it throws them into a limbo situation that is awkward and difficult for everyone. My apologies if this was not what is meant by "post licensure".

By post-licensure, I mean the people who were in the RN-BSN program, rather than the traditional BSN program (the school refers to these as the pre-licensure and post-licensure programs, hence my terminology). These were all people with other RN experience, that had been licensed for awhile, rather than new grads with IPs or getting their licenses.

I understand what you mean about delaying hiring, and that was the plan for my position- she'd said she'd hold my position until I passed the NCLEX, and to get in touch with her at that point. When I did just that, with the politics of the residency program, the offer was no longer on the table. I've heard the same story from others who have talked to nurse managers. It was out of their hands, but no actual new grads this cycle.

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