ACLS/PALS

  1. I will graduate from a BSN program in December of this year. I plan to move to Atlanta and apply for a job in the ICU at Northside hospital. From what I have read it is very difficult for a new grad to get hired in Atlanta. I want to increase my chances as much as possible. So my question is...would it be a good idea to get ACLS and PALS certifications before I apply for the job? Will this increase my chances of getting hired?
  2. Visit LadyEJ BSN, RN profile page

    About LadyEJ BSN, RN

    Joined: May '06; Posts: 222; Likes: 40
    Specialty: Clinicals

    8 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    It can't hurt, but it won't necessarily help. To find out for sure, you should call the hiring manager for this position and ask directly.
  4. by   pinkiepie_RN
    I've asked this question before and while it certainly won't hurt, I've heard that both ACLS and PALS rely on nursing/medical knowledge, something that may be difficult for you to do without being out in the field already. Most specialties that require it (that I know of) often pay for and send you to certification classes as part of your training. Oh and PALS is for peds, which wouldn't help you so much in the adult ICU. Good luck!

    I second caliotter3 in recommending that you check with HR/management. No use in you paying the money and taking the time for something that won't really help you out much.
  5. by   llg
    I agree with the others. My hospital provides those classes for our staff as needed. The new grads aren't scheduled to get the advanced classes until after they have had at least a couple of months of experience and are ready to learn the material.

    While it wouldn't hurt your chances of getting hired at my hospital ... it wouldn't help.
  6. by   loricatus
    What might make you stand out is joining the professional organization for your intended speciatly.

    You add something like this to your resume: Member, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
    In fact, student membership rates are discounted http://www.aacn.org/DM/Memberships/M...hGQDhbxh3Jnw==

    Membership shows that you are committed to the specialty-at least in the eyes of HR and a manager who has to choose from a zillion other applicants that all say they want to do critical care.
  7. by   pinkiepie_RN
    Quote from loricatus
    What might make you stand out is joining the professional organization for your intended speciatly.

    You add something like this to your resume: Member, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
    In fact, student membership rates are discounted http://www.aacn.org/DM/Memberships/M...hGQDhbxh3Jnw==

    Membership shows that you are committed to the specialty-at least in the eyes of HR and a manager who has to choose from a zillion other applicants that all say they want to do critical care.
    Oooh that's a great idea!
  8. by   IlovenursingRN
    If your employer wants you to have ACLS they will pay you two days to go take the course and pay for the class as well. I'd wait.
  9. by   LadyEJ BSN, RN
    Quote from loricatus
    What might make you stand out is joining the professional organization for your intended speciatly.

    You add something like this to your resume: Member, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
    In fact, student membership rates are discounted http://www.aacn.org/DM/Memberships/M...hGQDhbxh3Jnw==

    Membership shows that you are committed to the specialty-at least in the eyes of HR and a manager who has to choose from a zillion other applicants that all say they want to do critical care.
    This is wonderful information...thank you so much!
  10. by   jollydogg_RN
    Quote from loricatus
    What might make you stand out is joining the professional organization for your intended speciatly.

    You add something like this to your resume: Member, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
    In fact, student membership rates are discounted http://www.aacn.org/DM/Memberships/M...hGQDhbxh3Jnw==

    Membership shows that you are committed to the specialty-at least in the eyes of HR and a manager who has to choose from a zillion other applicants that all say they want to do critical care.
    thanks! i'll look into this myself =)

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