'Unhealthy' nurses...bad examples? - page 5

I hope this post doesn't offend anyone,but I have noticed a lot of the nurses I know are overweight,smokers or both. Obviously people become nurses because they completed school,and are qualified to... Read More

  1. by   TazziRN
    There are two schools of nursing in my county. One had a waiting list, the other did not. I went to the second. There were three people in my class who had been flunked from the first program. The school had an idea of what the perfect nurse should look like, and those three people did not fit that image: young, pretty, and female. Two were older and heavy, the other male. All three said that they felt they were targeted. There was a pattern of this over the years.

    That, among other reasons, was why the program failed after several more years and was closed down by the state to get their act together. They are open again but are on probationary status with the state. There is new blood so the attitudes will change.
  2. by   shazbo
    try nursing for 31 years and tell me how healthy you are!
  3. by   shazbo
    i think anymore my pts look at me and say "if she can do it i can do it". one survivor to another!
  4. by   ICRN2008
    I don't think that a nurse's weight has anything to do with his or her competence.

    However, I do wonder what our patients and their family member think when they see the pizza delivery guy bringing deep dish pepperonis up to the cardiac floor while they're on a restricted diet.....
  5. by   scribblerpnp
    In my experience as a peds nurse practitioner, the family/pt seems to accept/receive nutition/obesity information better from me than from the over-weight MD. Especially if the parents are overweight, or the child is overweight (if they are pre-teen, teenager especially.) This has been apparant both to the MD and myself. So much so that I now deal with nearly all the eduction for nutrition and obesity. It could be our teaching strategies, however, we have worked with each other for a long time now, and I personally never saw a difference when we would co-teach this info.
    There are exceptions to every rule. Every once in a while, the MD does better than I for the simple reason that the family/pt feels the MD is more empathetic than I can be because I "don't have a weight problem."

    That said, when I need care, I could care less what my nurse looks like or does during his/her off hours. So long as they know what they are doing with me! I want who ever is competent and has the necessary knowledge with my problem to teach/take care of me.
    Last edit by scribblerpnp on Sep 18, '06
  6. by   nuangel1
    Quote from TazziRN
    I take offense at this. I am overweight. I am a good nurse. I also love myself. Just because I am overweight and, in your eyes, don't "take care" of myself does not mean I am unloveable or an imcompetent nurse. I feel good about myself because my husband and my children love me for me, not because or in spite of what I look like. I did not have good self esteem with my ex husband because he was always making comments, like (pointing to a girl whose clothes looked painted on) "Why can't you look like that?" Perhaps people who are overweight or have other bad habits and have low self esteem have that because others point at them and ask "How can you do this to yourself?"
    i like your style .i am overweight i know that but i have been a nurse 20 yrs i am funny intelligent a damn good nurse and have family friends and a boyfriend that treat me with respect and love me for WHO I AM NOT WHAT I LOOK LIKE .
  7. by   nuangel1
    Quote from cookielady,rn
    I've worked with nurses who can barely walk they've neglected themselves so long. I hate to see it, and I hate seeing them as patients because I know how embarassing it is for them.

    I personally take offense to the comment that a skinny nurse would be incompetent. One can have beauty and brains.
    BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER SO TOO CAN THE NURSE BE THOUGHT OF AS UGLY BUT HAVE BRAINS TOO.
  8. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from BSNDec06
    I don't think that a nurse's weight has anything to do with his or her competence.

    However, I do wonder what our patients and their family member think when they see the pizza delivery guy bringing deep dish pepperonis up to the cardiac floor while they're on a restricted diet.....
    My husband was hospitalized for cardiac s/s and I couldn't believe what they brought him for dinner. Well, actually I have no idea what it was, but it was covered in gelatinous glop and could not possibly have part of a heart healthy diet. At least he would have enjoyed the pepperoni pizza.
  9. by   nuangel1
    Quote from mercyteapot
    It wasn't me who made that comment, and I agree that one can be both outwardly attractive and a competent nurse. However, one can also have weight management issues and be a competent nurse as well. How ironic that in one breath you protest being stereotyped and in the very next breath, you apply a stereotype yourself! The vast majority of overweight nurses I know are well able to handle the physical demands of the job. If there are those who can't, their situation should be addressed individually by management... just as thin nurses who may have difficulty with the physical demands of the job should be. The whole point is that weight, thin or heavy, doesn't equal competence. It just doesn't, and no amount of spinning will make it so.

    excellent well said
  10. by   banditrn
    I don't think that a person's outward appearence has anything to do with beauty - it's their spirit that makes them beautiful. And some outwardly beautiful people can have an ugly spirit.

    Sometimes, tho, it takes awhile to come to that realization.
  11. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from banditrn
    I don't think that a person's outward appearence has anything to do with beauty - it's their spirit that makes them beautiful. And some outwardly beautiful people can have an ugly spirit.

    Sometimes, tho, it takes awhile to come to that realization.
    while to others, it's a no-brainer.
    i guess it all comes down to as to how one defines beauty.
    to judge a person, based on their physical appearance, is short-sighted.
    i guess it takes all kinds, sigh.....

    leslie
  12. by   Elisheva
    I'm sure I'll get lots of static for this, but you gotta wonder about the mindset (healthy?) of a nurse in the first place. What other kind of professional with a degree:

    1. Works 12 hour shifts/nights/weekends/holidays?
    2 Accepts that taking BS from doctors/patients/families/other healthcare workers is just a part of their job ?
    3. Works daily in an enviroment of feces/urine/blood?
    4. Subjects themselves to contaminated needlesticks, exposure to HIV, Hepatitis B, and every bacterial contaminant known to man on a daily basis?
    5. Accepts the possibility of liability every moment of every shift and for years to come?
    6. Accepts work loads that are unsafe for both nurse and patient as a matter of routine?
    7. Does it for less pay than a plumber?

    Does that sound healthy?
  13. by   grace90
    Quote from Elisheva
    I'm sure I'll get lots of static for this, but you gotta wonder about the mindset (healthy?) of a nurse in the first place. What other kind of professional with a degree:

    1. Works 12 hour shifts/nights/weekends/holidays?
    2 Accepts that taking BS from doctors/patients/families/other healthcare workers is just a part of their job ?
    3. Works daily in an enviroment of feces/urine/blood?
    4. Subjects themselves to contaminated needlesticks, exposure to HIV, Hepatitis B, and every bacterial contaminant known to man on a daily basis?
    5. Accepts the possibility of liability every moment of every shift and for years to come?
    6. Accepts work loads that are unsafe for both nurse and patient as a matter of routine?
    7. Does it for less pay than a plumber?

    Does that sound healthy?
    It's a grungy, thankless job but somebody's gotta do it.

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