Starvation: A good thing when concerning the Obese. - page 5

After doing some research, I have yet to see a reason why an obese person would not want to just fast their way down to a healthy body fat percentage. If anyone can raise some legitimate points for... Read More

  1. by   xt1
    http://www.vegsource.com/articles2/g...er_fasting.htm

    Here's an article with a postive spin on fasting.
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from xt1
    http://www.vegsource.com/articles2/g...er_fasting.htm

    Here's an article with a postive spin on fasting.

    In the article, #3 it does state it's not recommended as the primary source for weight loss. It's just a pleasant side effect.

    There are many advocates of fasting for detox and spritiual quests. I have a couple of books about it myself. As I said I can't get past the emotional aspect as I get way too aggitated, probably hypoglycemia or something like that.
  3. by   Elisheva
    Quote from xt1
    Why do we? I always assumed people said 3 - 5 meals per day to keep the digestive system going and thereby increasing metabolism.
    My understanding is that we need to eat 3-5 meals a day to maintain our blood sugar levels. A dropping blood sugar may trigger hunger, so some people find that they are better able to keep their hunger at bay if they eat more smaller calorie meals a day.

    I find that I do better if I eat something every three hours. I try to eat small, less caloric snacks like Smart Pop pop corn, the small Dannon yogurts (45 calories), or a fruit. Then I drink lots of water. Allowing myself to get really hungry is a mistake for me; I'll overeat for sure.

    But everyone is different, and weight loss/healthy eating is so very individualized.
  4. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    something about using "starvation" and "good" in the same sentence that gives me an uneasy feeling... To me good starvation is an oxymoron. Pictures of starving, bloated people pop up in my head. Nothing good about that. Perhaps it is the wording that bothers me.

    Kris
  5. by   ERNP
    I don't know that I have anything to add, except to add my thoughts that starvation seems unnecessary for weight loss. It also seems incredibly extreme and non-sustainable.

    I have been overweight most of my adult life. I have tried more ways to lose weight than I can even remember. Most of them didn't work for very long. I had the least sustainable success with severe caloric intake limitations. Not only did I gain the weight right back with a few extra pounds for some sort of cosmic punishment, but I felt like crap and had zero in the energy department.

    My most recent attempt has been with a low carb diet. Kind of a merge between atkins, south beach, and the zone. Of course, it isn't a fast as the books claim it could be, but I'm not starving, I feel good, and I don't have those exceptional hungry times during the day. Over the last 6 months I have lost 45 pounds and have become a believer in the control of insulin secretion as a weight loss method.

    I still eat cake on birthdays and once per week my husband and I go out to eat (at which time I eat a reasonable quantity of whatever sounds good to me). But for the most part it is about protein, getting good nutritional value from the carbs I eat (green vegetables mostly) and the fight to keep enough fiber in the system (can you say supplement). Avoiding simple sugars and foods that contain rapidly digested carbohydrates that convert easily into sugar keeps blood sugar steady and avoids that times of extreme hunger.

    Not saying this would work for anyone else, but it has been working well for me.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Eating small "meals" throughout the day does these two things: it enhances metabolism and reduces the chances of insulin resistance (leading, potentially, to diabetes later). Therefore, by virtues of these alone, eating several small healthy snacks a day is a very, very much better idea than fasting OR eating the traditional "3 squares a day".

    Fasting incorrectly and without supervision can lead to organ and tissue, as well as bone damage (sometimes irreversible) and it may destroy one's metabolism!

    Make sense?
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Sep 25, '06
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    We are all not addressing the mental health issues regarding obesity. I still maintain, no diet, exercise, pill, fast, or other thing will bring the lasting and enduring healthy results if we do not address the EMOTIONAL and MENTAL issues that go with and yes, I will say it, abusing food. It IS abuse when we use it for other reasons than to nourish ourselves, or the occasional treat. And it's a huge epidemic, as anyone can see. If you want to be healthy for life (and sustain that large weight loss) you have to be mentally-fit, as well!
  8. by   ICRN2008
    There is a lot of research being done with regards to malnourishment in post-op Roux-en-Y (bariatric surgery) patients. I did some research while doing clinicals on a surgical floor this summer.

    Many of these patients are at risk for protein-energy malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. They can also become dehydrated quite quickly because it is difficult for them to consume an adequate amount of liquids, especially initially. The infection risk in this population is high because their diets are often protein-deficient.

    A quick Medline search will pull up more information than you could ever want to know...
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from kriso
    something about using "starvation" and "good" in the same sentence that gives me an uneasy feeling... To me good starvation is an oxymoron. Pictures of starving, bloated people pop up in my head. Nothing good about that. Perhaps it is the wording that bothers me.

    Kris

    I think that did throw us off.

    What the poster is really after is some information about weight loss and fasting.
  10. by   mvanz9999
    i agree with [color=#330000]smilingblueyes. you have to take care of the mental/emotional side as well.

    i think fasting would be a huge mistake. i'm very active, fit, and know a thing or two about weight. if you fast, what's going to happen is you're going to lose weight, of course. but you are not going to choose where you lose the weight from. this is going to result in a total mass loss from both fat and muscle. you're going to lose muscle, which is going to slow your metabolism down even further from what it currently is. when you start eating properly again, you're going to put all that weight back on, and then some.

    this is not at all the correct way to lose. you need to combine exercise with reduce (not absent) calories. it's going to take longer this way, but the weight will be much easier to keep off if you lose no more than 2 lbs/week. even if you are grossly obese, do not attempt to lose more than this.

    you need exercise to both keep your metabolism high, and exercise to either increase or maintain muscle mass. you also need to modify your diet so that you are not intaking more calories than you need to maintain your weight. it's a lifetime commitment. you cannot simply lose a ton of weight and then go back to your current lifestyle.

    you also need patience. you didn't become overweight overnight, you cannot undo it this quickly either.

    that's my take on the issue. there's no magic pill. time, commitment, and lifestyle change is the only way to lose weight permanently. i would rather you keep the weight on than yo-yo up and down.

    oh, and depsite all the diet fads, they are all nonsense. they are just that...diet fads. you need to permanently reduce intake of all foods, and that's the end of it.
  11. by   UM Review RN
    [Comment edited per request, SBE.]


    That said, I finally found the thread that this thread reminded me of. OP, you might want to check it out for some interesting information:

    https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/logi...ok-159384.html
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Sep 25, '06
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Can we please keep the word "troll" out of this thread? It seems to me, at least, to have value. Like Tweety said, if you find the thread annoying or flaming, please report problematic posts and then leave it to us to help out. Otherwise, yes, it can easily become a flame-fest.

    Thanks so much.
  13. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Quote from mvanz9999
    i agree with [color=#330000]smilingblueyes. you have to take care of the mental/emotional side as well.

    i think fasting would be a huge mistake. i'm very active, fit, and know a thing or two about weight. if you fast, what's going to happen is you're going to lose weight, of course. but you are not going to choose where you lose the weight from. this is going to result in a total mass loss from both fat and muscle. you're going to lose muscle, which is going to slow your metabolism down even further from what it currently is...
    and the main muscle of importance is the heart.

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