RN-BSN Small rural community

  1. Hello out there.
    I am new to this site. I live and work in a small rural community. We are trying to implement a rapid response team. Anyone out there have any suggestions? Has anyone had any luck and would be willing to share any information?
    Thanks.
  2. Visit tbarn profile page

    About tbarn

    Joined: Oct '06; Posts: 2

    9 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    Good luck with that. Welcome!
  4. by   Larry77
    We have a rapid response team at our facility but I'm really not sure who exactly responds (we don't need it in ED of course). I know that an ICU nurse and the nursing supervisor respond but not sure of who else...sorry couldn't be more helpful.
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from Larry77
    We have a rapid response team at our facility but I'm really not sure who exactly responds (we don't need it in ED of course). I know that an ICU nurse and the nursing supervisor respond but not sure of who else...sorry couldn't be more helpful.

    Respiratory Therapy
  6. by   CritterLover
    [font="comic sans ms"]day shift has an rn and an rt; night shift has an apn. and lots of protocols they can work off of for ordering basic labs/xrays/ekgs
  7. by   RNinSoCal
    We just had a call to our rapid response team this shift. Pt s/p CVA aspirated and had decreased LOC. Our team consists of the RT in charge, ICU charge nurse, and the ER MD if they are not in an actually emergent case. The ER MD was not needed this time nd the pt went to ICU. I am on Med/surg night shift and we utilize the team at least once a week.
    Hope that helps.
  8. by   kastas
    Quote from RNinSoCal
    We just had a call to our rapid response team this shift. Pt s/p CVA aspirated and had decreased LOC. Our team consists of the RT in charge, ICU charge nurse, and the ER MD if they are not in an actually emergent case. The ER MD was not needed this time nd the pt went to ICU. I am on Med/surg night shift and we utilize the team at least once a week.
    Hope that helps.


    Exactly what this poster said! ICU charge, RT charge and ED MD if available. We just started our team and it has already been a God-send for us!
  9. by   Larry77
    Yes RT also...but nobody from ED unless the house supervisor calls and asks for the a doc (usually for intubation). An ED nurse and doc respond to any "code blue's" however (resp/cardiac arrest)...so if a patient is obviously sick enough to need a doc there is usually a "code blue" called instead of a "rapid response".

    We usually use the rapid response team to get a patient off of the medical floors and into the ICU or to initiate a necessary change in tx (have heard of it used after post-op patient needed Narcan d/t too much px meds).
  10. by   snowfreeze
    The facility I work in has the following response:
    ICU nurse, telemetry nurse, RT, anesthesia, chief resident, nursing supervisor. Lab responds usually to run the blood to the lab. ICU or telemetry nurse handles patient care until transport to appropriate unit including taking patient to CT scan if new CVA. Bedside nurse gives report to chief resident and rest of response team, opens computer chart to give information during report. ICU nurse starts IV, pushes meds and draws blood, telemetry nurse documents and manages the crash cart. Nursing supervisor removes all unnecessary people from the room ASAP. Anesthesia intubates if necessary.
  11. by   tbarn
    Thank you to all of you for you bits of helpful information. I will let you know "how it goes"...................

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