Phlebotomy course for RNs

  1. Hi, I was wondering if anyone took or planning to take phlebotomy course to get help in their RN course. I heard it's a good course to take. Please help. I'm planning to take this in Fall since I'm still in a waiting list for my clinical.
  2. Visit Meena29 profile page

    About Meena29

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 11; Likes: 1

    17 Comments

  3. by   Jo Dirt
    Yea, I need this too.
  4. by   Meena29
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    Yea, I need this too.
    Thanks but can you tell me in RN job how much u think and how soon you think that this course should be done. I've start my clinicals yet because I'm in a waiting list. I'm planning to get a certificate for that this semester.
  5. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Meena29
    Hi, I was wondering if anyone took or planning to take phlebotomy course to get help in their RN course. I heard it's a good course to take. Please help. I'm planning to take this in Fall since I'm still in a waiting list for my clinical.
    In the hospital I worked at, the nurses didn't draw blood, the phlebotomists did, home health was where I learned how to draw blood. They were going to send me for a day of phlebotomy - drawing blood for 8 hours, but I'm doing fine with it. There have only been maybe 2 times in 5 months where I couldn't get a specimen. But hey, the more experience the better I say. As long as it isn't really expensive for you.
  6. by   clee1
    Quote from Meena29
    Hi, I was wondering if anyone took or planning to take phlebotomy course to get help in their RN course. I heard it's a good course to take. Please help. I'm planning to take this in Fall since I'm still in a waiting list for my clinical.
    Depends on where you want to work.

    If you want to work in a Dr.'s office or in Homehealth, phlebotomy might be a very valuable skill. In the hospital, the lab has phlebotomists on staff to draw samples.

    Having said all that, a nurse DOES start most INT's; if you can hit the vein to draw labs, you can usually get a line in. Practice does make perfect....
  7. by   piper_for_hire
    It depends .... if you work in crit care you probably will draw everything yourself.

    -S

    Quote from clee1
    Depends on where you want to work.

    If you want to work in a Dr.'s office or in Homehealth, phlebotomy might be a very valuable skill. In the hospital, the lab has phlebotomists on staff to draw samples.

    Having said all that, a nurse DOES start most INT's; if you can hit the vein to draw labs, you can usually get a line in. Practice does make perfect....
  8. by   clee1
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    It depends .... if you work in crit care you probably will draw everything yourself.

    -S
    True, but in the units you'll probably draw from a central line of some type, so phlebotomy skills wouldn't come into play.
  9. by   piper_for_hire
    I draw blood cultures all the time. I put in a couple of IVs a week and do about two or three lab draws from a butterfly each week. Doesn't make me a pro, but it's enough to keep my feet wet.

    -S

    Quote from clee1
    True, but in the units you'll probably draw from a central line of some type, so phlebotomy skills wouldn't come into play.
  10. by   NurseKittyAtlanta
    In the ER where I precepted, the nurses drew ALL their own labs and did ALL their own IVs. Considering labs were drawn on almost every patient in the ER, they really had their hands full. A phlebotomy course would be extremely useful if you want to work in such an environment.
  11. by   Meena29
    thanks you all.
  12. by   Medic/Nurse
    This is a technical skill. The more "training" and experience you have the better you will be. Being "good" at venous access for blood sampling or IV placement is a skill that all patients appreciate! Excellence here will add to their overall satisfaction with their care! A terrible experience may not make up for the best care otherwise!

    As long as the "course" is not too expensive, I say can't hurt - might help - so why not? Now, I wouldn't "pay" for certifications/testing and such, because that is not a need and will not change your clinical practice as a nurse!

    This is a "numbers game". Get the numbers and you will get good at IV placement and lab draws. IV's are a bit more difficult to place than "sticking" for just a lab draw, but all veni-puncture experience helps!

    Good Luck!
  13. by   SportyNurse
    I took the phlebotomy course and did very well in it, I nailed all of my blood draws with no problems. So I figured I wouldn't have a problem starting an IV...

    For me the phlebotomy did nothing, turns out I'm great at drawing blood, but not very great at starting an IV. The technique, the hand movements and the placement feels very different than just popping the vein and getting some blood out. It made me a little more confident, but the only thing that helped me get better at IVs, was starting IVs.
  14. by   Empress
    Quote from jenrninmi
    In the hospital I worked at, the nurses didn't draw blood, the phlebotomists did, home health was where I learned how to draw blood. They were going to send me for a day of phlebotomy - drawing blood for 8 hours, but I'm doing fine with it. There have only been maybe 2 times in 5 months where I couldn't get a specimen. But hey, the more experience the better I say. As long as it isn't really expensive for you.
    I wouldn't rely on lab phlebotomists either, I work as one right now and if we cannot get it then we kick it back to the nursing staff. It's a good skill to have.

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