Paramedics are taking our Nursing job! - page 4

I got to beat the dead horse, I'm feeling it today as I read the classified's. Before flaming me to the burn unit, I was the 89th paramedic in Iowa. I got in on the first class opened to general... Read More

  1. by   GeauxNursing
    Quote from FlyingScot
    Anybody else thinking of that South Park episode where the humans from the future came and took all the jobs? "They took ar jobs!" I've been cracking up all day. Where's my plaid flannel shirt?

    http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/104259
    They took err jeebs!
  2. by   GeauxNursing
    Ryandfd, Cruffler, Enlighten me!
    So how does one, as an EMS or a paramedic, work in a hospital? I guess my only experience with them is when we have an emergency and we need transport from the dialysis clinic to the hospital. Or our non-mobile patients come in from the NH or something. That's all I know! What can a paramedic do that EMS can't? What do y'all do when you "work in the hospital?" You have assignments and stuff, responsibilities? I mean I just picture paramedics hanging around the nurses' station chatting until something happens. (And I TOTALLY mean no offense, but we did clinicals at a really slow hospital, and the EMS guys would bring in a pt, then just hang around and talk it up for hours.?
    I am just curious as to what you would do in a hospital, as an employee? I thought EMS was just a "mobile" job.
    Muchas gracias
  3. by   GilaRRT
    First, EMS means emergency medical services. A Paramedic plays an integral role within the animal of EMS. Much of what a paramedic does will be based on their state SOP and facility policy/procedures. Some places employ paramedics as glorified assistants, while other places employ paramedics in a much more involved role where they have a wider SOP.

    It is not that hard to think about a paramedic working within the facility. Most paramedics have around a couple hundred hours of in hospital clinical experience from paramedic school. Granted, their role as a student differs significantly from that of an RN. Typically, paramedics use their hospital time to complete procedures and patient assessments. (This is where they perform supervised OR intubations) Typically, the PM student will have ER, OR, and possibly ICU and OB experience. In addition to the hospital rotation, PM students complete a couple hundred hours of precepted ALS ambulance experience.

    Clearly, the exact number of clinical experience varies significantly from program to program.

    Also remember there is a significant difference between an EMT and a paramedic regarding responsibilities, education , and SOP. Actually, there is a significant difference among the educational levels of paramedics nation wide.
  4. by   Seagate
    Quote from MacERRN
    Default Re: Paramedics are taking our Nursing job!
    How are the hospitals replacing RNs with Paramedics? Sorry, I did'nt understand your post.

    It's mostly in the ED's; Instead of hiring RN's they're hiring EMT-P's. Saves the hospital a boat load on $$$. But we all know , and the research is well documented on this:The more RN's taking care of pts, the better the outcomes.
    Which hospital is this at? I'm going to have to give the owner a call.
  5. by   Valerie Salva
    i looked on the hawaii bon website, and the term "nurse" is legally protected in hawaii, too. it appears that in2b8u was breaking hawaii state law every time he referred to himself as a nurse.

    section 457-7, (2)(d)

    [color=#0000cc][pdf]
    hawaii revised statutes chapter457-nursing 0408

    file format: pdf/adobe acrobat
    state shall have the right to use the title "registered nurse" and the ... other person shall assume the title "nurse" or in any manner imply that the ...
    hawaii.gov/dcca/areas/pvl/main/hrs/hrs_pvl_457.pdf



    "any person who holds a license to practice as a registered nurse in this state shall have the right to use the title "registered nurse" and the abbreviation "rn". no other person shall assume the title "nurse" or in any manner imply that the person is a nurse except as provided in sections 457-8 and 457.8.5 or use any other words, letters or signs or devices to indicate that the person using the name is a registered nurse."

    hawaii.gov/dcca/areas/pvl/main/hrs/hrs_pvl_457.pdf


    paramedics are educated professionals, and are an integral part of health-care all over the world. but- they are not nurses, and the op was wrong to refer to himself as a nurse.

    years ago, i was thinking of becoming a paramedic, and i joined a paramedic/ems discussion board. i won a writing contest on the site, and received as my prize a hat with the star of life and the word "paramedic" on it. i never wore the hat because i was not a paramedic and would never try to make myself out to be something that i was not. i later worked with a paramedic who moonlighted as a tech at a dialysis unit where i had a travel contract. i gave the hat to him.
    Last edit by Valerie Salva on Jun 15, '09
  6. by   CrufflerJJ
    Quote from GeauxNursing
    Ryandfd, Cruffler, Enlighten me!
    So how does one, as an EMS or a paramedic, work in a hospital? I guess my only experience with them is when we have an emergency and we need transport from the dialysis clinic to the hospital. Or our non-mobile patients come in from the NH or something. That's all I know! What can a paramedic do that EMS can't? What do y'all do when you "work in the hospital?" You have assignments and stuff, responsibilities? I mean I just picture paramedics hanging around the nurses' station chatting until something happens. (And I TOTALLY mean no offense, but we did clinicals at a really slow hospital, and the EMS guys would bring in a pt, then just hang around and talk it up for hours.?
    I am just curious as to what you would do in a hospital, as an employee? I thought EMS was just a "mobile" job.
    Muchas gracias
    My experience as an EMT-Basic & NREMT-P (paramedic) was all in the field, on a fire dept. I can't speak much as to what a medic is permitted to do in a hospital. I have seen medics in some local ERs here in the Dayton, OH area, and when I interviewed at an ER in mid-KY, they used paramedics to handle incoming triage (using a clearly defined protocol).

    If your local EMS folks hung around the nurse's station, chatting for hours, they probably were not busy, and didn't have any pressure from their "brass" to get back in service as soon as possible.
  7. by   MacERRN
    Any of you paramedics know what High, Hot, & Hell of alot refers to? Yeah If you worked with me you'd get all the enemas. I'd even teach you how to administer a kayexalate retention enema, a contrast enema, and the proper mixture of a milk and molasses enema. Come to think of it, we do need more paramedics in the ER.
  8. by   psychonaut
    Dangit, beat me to the South Park reference...pops into my head every time I see the thread title (as well as the zillion other md vs np vs pa vs rn vs emt vs ma vs cna vs pct vs vs vs...)
    Last edit by psychonaut on Jun 16, '09 : Reason: what a stupid 100th post ;)
  9. by   CrufflerJJ
    Quote from MacERRN
    Any of you paramedics know what High, Hot, & Hell of alot refers to? Yeah If you worked with me you'd get all the enemas. I'd even teach you how to administer a kayexalate retention enema, a contrast enema, and the proper mixture of a milk and molasses enema. Come to think of it, we do need more paramedics in the ER.
    No thanks. Not quite sure how to respond to this post, other than to ask you to consider paramedics in the ER as a valued team member until their actions prove that they are something else. If your post indicates how you'd treat a team member, then I'm sorry.
  10. by   JustMe
    Frankly I'm more worried about a hospital that would hire an EMT in place of an RN as the ONLY person other than the physician. Sounds like a very small understaffed hospital--not where I'd want to live or work. Some parts of Hawaii can be very rural so perhaps an EMT was the best they could come up with.

    Another thread addresses the differences between nursing and medicine. The lines are grey between all of these practices. Tasks are shared among the professions but it is up to each individual discipline to know when the line has been crossed. In this case the hospital crossed the line by hiring an EMT when an RN was required. Yes, many hospitals are hiring EMTs for their ERs--but is this appropriate?? We have a nursing shortage--maybe more hospitals should step up to the plate and help their EMTs to get nursing degrees. Then they would not be out of compliance with professional standards.

    EMTs and paramedics are trained for work in the field. RNs and LVNs are trained for bedside care. Anything else requires specialized training after licensure along with following standardized protocols. Just because a paramedic can intubate in the field does not mean he/she can do it in the hospital. That's where the line is crossed--at the ER door.

    Just my
  11. by   jcampbell
    i do believe clear guidelines need to be established on a national level to keep individuals and companies from exercising errors in judgment as we have read in these posts.
    Last edit by jcampbell on Jun 17, '09 : Reason: written in anger
  12. by   gonzo1
    I love working with paramedics in the ER. All the ones I have met are awesome. And some of them are way better at some things than I am.

    What I object to is a paramedic calling himself a nurse. Saying that anyone taking care of a sick person is a nurse. And this particular paramedic devaluing our education and value. And bragging how much better he is than a nurse.

    Nurse is a protected title. I worked hard to earn mine.

    I continue to welcome any paramedic to work with me. They bring a lot to the table and I appreciate them.
  13. by   helicoptergal
    This thread vividly illustrates the vast misunderstanding of the profession of a Paramedic. There is not a standardized scope of practice regardless if a paramedic is nationally registered or not. Each state has a different scope of practice for paramedics. Some areas require doctor consultation to start an IV, and in some areas paramedics have a expanded scope of practice that includes aggressive expanded treatment procedures and protocols. Optimally Paramedics provide an integral link in the chain in the health care continuum. And rather view the attempts of Paramedics to work in the hospital as trying to take over, I believe that it provides the opportunity to provide better patient care by utilizing a multi-disciplinary approach.

close