Nursing, Smoking, and Kids - page 3

I have a neighbor that has two small children and they are serious chain smokers. I've always thought that smoking around children is a form of child abuse. But I've never wanted to say anything to... Read More

  1. by   JettaDP
    Quote from Alois Wolf

    Would you agree that there is a difference between constantly blowing smoke in a child's face than smoking a cigarette and taking precautions to have as little impact on their health due to a disease (in this case addiction).
    I absolutely agree. There's a huge difference. But in the case of my neighbors, they aren't taking any precautions. They hold their kids while they smoke. If I always saw them smoking out on the porch while the kids were inside, I would never have thought anything about it.

    While I 100% agree that it is an addiction, that doesn't mean that they have to do it while holding or in the presence of their kids.
  2. by   JettaDP
    Quote from TheCommuter
    By the way, here's a link to another insightful thread on "Smoking and Kids," if anyone is interested. It contains several posts from a mother/nurse who admits to smoking cigerettes in the home around her young children, so the OP (original poster) might be interested in her viewpoints.

    https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/kids...on-150744.html
    I did look at this thread. Thank you for sharing. What I learned from the responses she got and the responses that I have got is that I am out of place to bring up the subject because 1) I am not a health care professional yet, and 2) there is a big difference between me wanting to help my neighbors and a nurse or doctor bringing up the subject in a clinical setting. Even if I was a nurse right now, bringing it up outside of a clincial setting in not the right thing to do. I can just hope that when they take the kids in for their check-ups that their health care provider will educate them.

    Thanks for providing this link. It did show me another perspective.
  3. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from spring05
    I can just hope that when they take the kids in for their check-ups that their health care provider will educate them.
    Many healthcare providers avoid mentioning the subjects of passive smoking and nicotine cessation to this specific patient population, because they don't want to do anything to alienate these parents. Patients are sources of revenue for doctors' offices and clinics, and they'll simply find somewhere else to go if they hear about smoking cessation too many times from the same healthcare provider.
  4. by   2006RNCS
    I grew up in a household where both parents and an older brother smoked. They smoked so much, that my clothes and hair reeked of it when I went to school. When I was in middle school, some classmates accused me of smoking. There was so much smoke in my clothes and hair, that I could see why they thought I did. My parents smoked while I was in the car with them. Windows were up or down, but that really did not make a lot of difference.

    I suffered from colds and asthma, and I missed a lot of school because of it. I have permanent lung damage because of exposure to the smoke. My mom even smoked when she was pregnant with me, and I was born premature and underweight.

    I know that it is an option to smoke or not smoke, but please parents, don't make your children suffer because of your habit or addiction. They are innocent. Some may not show the damage until many years down the road. Love them enough to not smoke around them.

    My dad died from lung cancer, and my mom still smokes, and suffers from every ailment imaginable, most relating back to her smoking. She has COPD, CHF, CAD, emphysema, peripheral vascular neuropathy, and AMD.
    So, I am not trying to preach, but I know what devastating effects smoking has on a family. God bless each of you.heartbeat:heartbeat
  5. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Many healthcare providers avoid mentioning the subjects of passive smoking and nicotine cessation to this specific patient population, because they don't want to do anything to alienate these parents. Patients are sources of revenue for doctors' offices and clinics, and they'll simply find somewhere else to go if they hear about smoking cessation too many times from the same healthcare provider.
    is there any data supporting your contention, commuter...
    that healthcare providers avoid mentioning subjects of passive smoking/nicotine cessation?
    i'm incredulous and would love to read this.

    my kids pediatricians always, ALWAYS brought up my smoking habits.
    even to this day, all of the md's/np's, still do.
    granted, now, and after yrs of knowing me/kids, they 'tease' me, asking me if i'm still smoking on my deck?
    but their messages are loud and clear, nonetheless.

    thanks for any data you can provide.

    leslie
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from earle58
    is there any data supporting your contention, commuter...
    In a nutshell, no.

    And my parents would always lie about their smoking habits to healthcare providers, insurance agents, and anyone who asked.
  7. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from earle58
    thanks for any data you can provide.

    leslie
    Yippee!!! I found something. . .

    http://www.cfah.org/hbns/newsrelease...ng11-01-01.cfm

    Nurses Advise Patients to Quit Smoking Only Half the Time
    Despite increased efforts to encourage health care professionals to counsel their patients on smoking cessation, many nurses feel ill-equipped to broach the subject, according to new research.

    Some hospitals participating in the study used stickers on patients' charts to prompt nurses to ask about smoking status and give cessation advice. However, even with this reminder, nurses talked about smoking with their patients only 50 percent of the time.
  8. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from thecommuter
    in a nutshell, no.

    and my parents would always lie about their smoking habits to healthcare providers, insurance agents, and anyone who asked.
    that's really, really sad.
    i can truthfully say that i hate that i smoke and recognize what a neurotic nut i look like while i'm having a smoke outside in a storm.
    i am all for a legal, federal ban.
    today has been my 2nd day w/o a smoke, for the 356th time.

    Quote from thecommuter
    i have mixed feelings about this...
    since i am a smoker, i would feel like a total hypocrite if telling my pts not to smoke.
    but it's not so much a big deal in my specialty.
    i let them do whatever they darn well please.
    but my point is, i couldn't tell my pts one thing while i'm just as guilty.
    empathy and education (in the form of written material) is all i can do.

    leslie
  9. by   pirap
    i wouldn't confront these people but you are right..it is child abuse..

    can you imagine what it must be like in a car with the windows rolled up and someone sucking on cigarette after cigarette with these poor helpless souls strapped in the car with no way to get out or a way to roll the windows down...the windows may be slightly cracked but come on..no one rides with the windows down anymore!!! even if you roll them down all the way smoke is still in the car or ashes are getting blown all around!!

    can you imagine these kids in their beds night after night breathing horrible cigarette smoke? man the thought just makes me want to puke my brains out...

    have you ever smelled the children of smokers?? they absolute reek of cigarette smoke..not just on their clothes but down to their pores..you can even smell it on their breath.

    you wouldn't leave a loaded gun on the coffee table, or an open bottle of medicine out in their reach..both could be deadly in an instant..but if you smoke around your kids you are killing them--slowly.
  10. by   I love my cat!
    I wouldn't say a word. Trust me, people in general do not like being told how act or behave. They will become angry and defensive.
    If you confront them, I guarantee they will be watching you like a hawk. They will be waiting to chew you to threads for the slightest wrong-doing that you may do, even if you did it by accident.
    If you really want to provide educational information, maybe you could mail pamphlets anonymously. Doesn't mean they will read it though.

    Good Luck!!
  11. by   beachbum3
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Many healthcare providers avoid mentioning the subjects of passive smoking and nicotine cessation to this specific patient population, because they don't want to do anything to alienate these parents. Patients are sources of revenue for doctors' offices and clinics, and they'll simply find somewhere else to go if they hear about smoking cessation too many times from the same healthcare provider.

    Do you think they don't want to alienate the parents because they are afraid they will go elsewhere?

    I get the not wanting to alienate a patient, though. We can't help them if we do that. Confronting someone on a bad habit/behavior is something I feel you can only do once you have created a trusting relationship with someone. Unfortunately in a hospital setting our patients aren't there very long and we may not get them for more than a shift or two. Hard to build that kind of nurse-patient relationship in 12 hours. However, those who are clinic nurses (or other settings for that matter) may have more of an opportunity to build a more trusting relationship and can open up lines of communication about these subjects with out the patients automatically getting defensive right off the bat. I also think it depends on how you approach someone. As in most things, approaching with an air of understanding, empathy and support will get one farther than with a half hearted reminder or a 'lecturing' tone.

    Regardless, one would practically have to live under a rock to not know that smoking is unhealthy and secondhand smoke is terrible for children. I think most smokers know this. Its whether or not they care enough to protect their children from it by not smoking in front of them, and/or are ready themselves to quit.
  12. by   JettaDP
    Quote from beachbum3
    I get the not wanting to alienate a patient, though. We can't help them if we do that. Confronting someone on a bad habit/behavior is something I feel you can only do once you have created a trusting relationship with someone. Unfortunately in a hospital setting our patients aren't there very long and we may not get them for more than a shift or two. Hard to build that kind of nurse-patient relationship in 12 hours. However, those who are clinic nurses (or other settings for that matter) may have more of an opportunity to build a more trusting relationship and can open up lines of communication about these subjects with out the patients automatically getting defensive right off the bat. I also think it depends on how you approach someone. As in most things, approaching with an air of understanding, empathy and support will get one farther than with a half hearted reminder or a 'lecturing' tone.
    You make a really good point. A trusting relationship is probably necessary to have this kind of a conversation. It's too bad having this kind of a relationship with most people is hard to come by. Due to reason that you said.
  13. by   beachbum3
    Quote from earle58
    i can truthfully say that i hate that i smoke and recognize what a neurotic nut i look like while i'm having a smoke outside in a storm.

    i feel the same way. i'm almost embarrassed about it. i always worry about whether or not i'm bothering someone when i go near someone who is a nonsmoker after i've had a smoke. when i've gone to visit friends with babies, i don't smoke at all until after i see the baby, because i imagine just the smell of smoke on my clothes can't be good for them. i never smoked during my pregnancies (and actually quit for 7 years during the time i was having kids and married. started back during my divorce, but thats a different story entirely!) and so and i are planning a pregnancy in january, so i'll be quitting again (and him too) in the next few months. (hopefully for good!!) i'm super paranoid about offending others with my smoking. i know i shouldn't smoke. i know all the risks and how bad it is for me.

    to the credit of my healthcare providers- our nurse at our family practice has talked to me about quitting, and when i went for my employee health screening the nurse counseled me as well about quitting. now that i think of it... no dr. has ever mentioned it to me! wonder why its always the nurses? even at the obgyn the nurse practitioner who does my check ups says something everytime.
    Last edit by beachbum3 on Jul 23, '08

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