Nurses in society

  1. i dont understand why media does not depict nurses role as to what they are or what they do................i mean in every tv show like diagnosis X or mystery diagnosis they show doctors or residents doing stuff that they usually dont.................i have never seen a doctor or resident drawing blood or doing catheter...............i dont understand why is it so.......
  2. Visit vnuwish profile page

    About vnuwish

    Joined: Jun '09; Posts: 13; Likes: 5

    11 Comments

  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from 2009wish
    i dont understand why media does not depict nurses role as to what they are or what they do................i mean in every tv show like diagnosis X or mystery diagnosis they show doctors or residents doing stuff that they usually dont.................i have never seen a doctor or resident drawing blood or doing catheter...............i dont understand why is it so.......
    Sometimes, I wonder if it is due to the history of nursing...at one time, those providing nursing care were ne'er do wells such as prostitutes, as a jail sentence, etc...and thus, were not the aristrocrats of society. In addition, by the way that the sick were treated, they were dispensable. These are just my musings on the subject, nothing that I personally agree with, but, it took many years for nursing to even be considered as a respectable vocation.

    It is a very unrealistic view or fantasy to see physicans toileting patients, doing dressings, walking or hanging IV bags while pining over a patient, anticipating their speedy recovery...makes me sick, actually.
  4. by   lindarn
    I actually had a medical resident who would always just jump in and help- lifiting patients up in bed, placing foley catheters with out even a blink, etc.

    It turns out he was a medic in the Army, had the military, "I am here to help," attitude, and the discipline to go along with it. He respected nurses, because in the military, all RNs are officers, and undoubtedly, they ALL outranked him! It was a refreshing change!

    So, yes, there are doctors who do help out, and do "nurse things", but I agree, they are few and far between in the real world!


    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from lindarn
    I actually had a medical resident who would always just jump in and help- lifiting patients up in bed, placing foley catheters with out even a blink, etc.

    It turns out he was a medic in the Army, had the military, "I am here to help," attitude, and the discipline to go along with it. He respected nurses, because in the military, all RNs are officers, and undoubtedly, they ALL outranked him! It was a refreshing change!

    So, yes, there are doctors who do help out, and do "nurse things", but I agree, they are few and far between in the real world!


    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    I suspect that because he actually learned from nurses as well as was outranked, he was able to gain a great deal of respect for them. And, the military doesn't play! Good for him. Where is he? He needs to come to my hospital!
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    I'm curious, lindarn, did you see HawthoRNe? What was your take on it, if you did? I found it to be a bit unrealistic for a CNO to be so directly involved with patient care, or even in morning rounds. It would be welcomed, but not in my real world.
  7. by   mama_d
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I suspect that because he actually learned from nurses as well as was outranked, he was able to gain a great deal of respect for them. And, the military doesn't play! Good for him. Where is he? He needs to come to my hospital!
    My favorite doc that I deal with at work used to be in the Navy, served in both Gulf wars...I wonder if that has anything to do with how respectful he is to the nurses. If so, I can think of several who should be drafted for attitude adjustment therapy!
  8. by   lornasrn
    I love the idea of drafting disrespectful docs for attitude adjustment. I can think of some that need it. At my hospital we do have a few good docs that do jump in and help as well as our PA's. It is not the norm though and I agree the media should give us some credit. We are the ones at the bedside and we are the ones doing the bulk of the work and it is our assessment skills that save lives.
  9. by   HippyGreenPeaceChick
    Quote from lindarn
    I actually had a medical resident who would always just jump in and help- lifiting patients up in bed, placing foley catheters with out even a blink, etc.

    It turns out he was a medic in the Army, had the military, "I am here to help," attitude, and the discipline to go along with it. He respected nurses, because in the military, all RNs are officers, and undoubtedly, they ALL outranked him! It was a refreshing change!

    So, yes, there are doctors who do help out, and do "nurse things", but I agree, they are few and far between in the real world!


    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

    I can testify first hand of the close working relationship between Doctors, Nurses and Medics and Corpsman. And the way all respected and treated each other. There are benefits to the military way. Which is why I am reenlisting as a Nurse in the Navy.
  10. by   Nurserton
    Yea I love watching the docs hang bags of fluid and just generally hanging around pts at the bedside. At our hospital, I wonder if the docs ID cards even give them access to the med rooms...they sure never step foot in them...or in supply rooms to get supplies for their own procedures.
    I wanted to see HawthoRNe, mad I missed it. There is another new RN show coming out too...can't think of the name...but 2 new RN shows in one season!!! Let's see how they go you guys..
  11. by   vnuwish
  12. by   platon20
    At the same time, there's a ridiculous TV show called "Mercy" which shows an RN rushing out to an accident scene, diagnosing tension pneumothorax, and doing a rapid needle decompression. Quite ridiculous.
  13. by   leslie :-D
    great video..."just a nurse".

    suggest all to watch it.
    and thank you, 2009wish.

    leslie

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