NP discusses MJ on national TV ???? - page 8

I just watched CNN and a nurse practioner(she gave her name) was on the phone giving information about Michael Jackson and what he discussed with her and what medication he was given (not by her) for... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    While it is obvious that I am a fan of Michael Jacksons talent and positive impact, I can also say that he is responsible for part of what happened. Maybe he was mentally incompetent due to his upbringing and the influence of script drugs, but he did initiate much of the eccentric propoganda such as allowing press releases of purchasing the elephant man's bones, sleeping in the hyperbaric chamber, the monkey, etc... Also, there could have been just as many medical professionals that said 'no' to him the same as those who said yes and catered to his whims. It seems that he made it his life's goal to find someone to give him the drugs he wanted. Then, when the negative press came out and album sales decreased, he didn't seem to be able to handle it very well. And, we can't make ANYONE take care of themselves, or make anyone more concerned about them, no matter how much money they have. Apparently, all of the money in the world did not encourage this cardiologist to sit with him the ENTIRE time that fateful night to monitor him, or to even practice proper CPR on him (wasn't the story that the doctor found him this way? If he were supervised the whole time, the doctor may have been able to see he was under distress). And, it makes me wonder...most times, a person would have hired a nurse to sit and monitor a patient, but since this drug was illegally available, the doctor probably didn't want another person with a medical background around to possibly report it.

    I don't doubt that this woman is a licensed nurse, but I do question her public announcement. Why NOW? She should have called for assistance, for sure. I really don't believe she should have spoken about this on television from an ethical point of view. I think it is for the 15 minutes of fame and probably got paid.
  2. by   StrbryJelo
    I was not aware that HIPPA laws protect info after you die. Of course, there are lots of things I'm not aware of. I know medical privilege (md/pt confidentiality) ends with death, so why not HIPPA? To give up info the way this person did can be tacky, but is it violating laws?
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Indy
    There do exist words for how I feel about this but it's difficult to say it such that it does not violate the TOS. ANYhow, I'm pretty ticked off that because one freakazoid celebrity managed to not only do drugs but get ahold of general anesthesia medication, we now have little ole diprivan in the national spotlight as a drug of abuse.

    In general, and sometimes as glaring individuals, people are STUPID. We are! They are! It's a fact, but for the love of all that is holy, I see that in the future we will be having more difficult access to diprivan and have another dagflabbit piece of paper for two nurses to fill out in order to throw away diprivan, for pete's sake. Yep. One famous idiot dies and the nurses get more work. Why stop mollycoddling the general public there? You know all drugs can kill you, even oxygen, right? OMG the public didn't know that?? Well we have to do something! Quick make the nurses double check each other when they put O2 on a patient! Oh oh oh and make them sign off each other's meds, ALL of 'em. Without having more nurses, too. We got to save money in this economy, you know.

    Yep. Stupid. I'm not sorry if I offended any fans, either. I didn't like the celebrity in question in the first place, and now that there's a possibility his death will cause my work habits to be affected, I have only blistering hostility to cast that direction. Dumb people are everywhere, unfortunately things only become interesting when they happen to famous dumb people.
    I can say that even as a fan of Michael Jackson, I respect your candor and did not think of the other aspects you mentioned, such as more complications in our already burdensome careers. And, it is true, that VIPS in general can, have and always will make our lives miserable. Thanks for bringing that up, I would be interested to know how this impacts on obtaining Diprivan for even the right purposes, now.
  4. by   Nurse6412
    Drug addiction is a disease. I was told that all of us have "one" in our family. As quiet as its kept - This is true. If not in our family possibly -a close family friend. It is some one we work with - go to church with - SOMEONE! Nurses -Would you actually discuss their disease with the media? After death ? Golly! Mr. Jackson - despite any opinions - is still a human being that deserves respect. As nurses - aren't we held at a higher standard? Golly again!
  5. by   avillion23
    Quote from dawngloves
    In the interview I saw with her, she said that Michael Jackson asked her to get him Diprivan and she told him, "If you take that, you may not wake up." When his aide called and Michael Jackson was in the backgroung complaining about his half hot/half cold body, she told him to get to a hospital. She didn't know why his body was like that. Who knows if he was on Diprivan at the time?
    Now that whole, "he was not a drug addict he just wanted sleep" nonsense....I've had insomnia. You know what I took? 50 mg of Benedryl! Oxycontin, Demerol, nor Diprivan even crossed my mind!
    I completely agree with you. I don't see how everyone is pointing a finger at the NP. She is only relaying what the patient wanted her to provide, she is not disclosing that he was technically taking Diprivan. I guess everyone's perception is clouded by his celebrity. Anyone who requests a drug that harsh to fall asleep, IS a junkie, druggie, etc..... Can't be denied and frankly I am disturbed that he is being held up so much by the media as a good father and good person. Come on, one look at the dude and you can tell he had some deep psychological issues. And there isn't a doubt in my mind that he was wrongly acquitted, but that is neither here nor there.
  6. by   dotherightthing
    Quote from misslady113
    i just watched cnn and a nurse practioner(she gave her name) was on the phone giving information about michael jackson and what he discussed with her and what medication he was given (not by her) for his insomnia. she also talked about when she treated his kids for a cold and what she gave them. is this legal?? what happened to patient confidentiality?? can you just go on national tv and discuss a patient because he is dead????
    the thrill of taking care of michael jackson went completely sour when he died of questionable causes. though certainly a violation of confidentiality, this np is probably trying to cover her bottom half, as she was involved to some degree in michael's care. if diprivan was found in his home, someone, possibly a healthcare provider, was really out of pocket. i'm sure she wants to make it known that she was not involved in providing any inappropriate medications. i'd rather cop to a hippa violation rather than a murder beef.
  7. by   kmrmom42
    Quote from Bee Rose
    Jackson's MDs sited HIPPA and kept quiet. No question Cherilyn Lee violated HIPPA. Even prior to HIPPA, she would have been violating patient confidentiality. The question is, will the nursing board take action against her? I hope they do or what good is the law. I don't believe her entire statements because they became grander with each interview. I noticed that she does not have prescription authority as part of her licensure, which explains the nutritional and holistic-only scope of her practice as listed on her business website. She attended a good school that confired both an NP and PA simulaniously (I don't think they still do that). She also has a PhD and therefore is able to advertise herself as Dr Cherilyn Lee. I'm a California NP. Our profession has fought hard to overcome certain perceptions about us. Despite her educational achievements, her unprofessional appearances made us all look bad.
    I read through the posts until I found one that at least somewhat mirrored my initial reaction. I agree that her behavior is making us all look bad. Nurses were once thought to be the most trusted of professionals. What will the public think about trusting us in the future after this violation of a dead man's privacy. If there is any information that the public needs to know about drugs being involved in MJs death it should come from the legal system and not from a shameless publicity seeker.
  8. by   joyouter
    Quote from kmrmom42
    I read through the posts until I found one that at least somewhat mirrored my initial reaction. I agree that her behavior is making us all look bad. Nurses were once thought to be the most trusted of professionals. What will the public think about trusting us in the future after this violation of a dead man's privacy. If there is any information that the public needs to know about drugs being involved in MJs death it should come from the legal system and not from a shameless publicity seeker.
    Your statement reflects my thoughts on the subject. It is unclear as to why she chose to be in the public eye after MJ's questionable cause of death whereas no MD came forward with a clear explanation. It may be possible that a nurse would be seen as an ideal scapegoat and would deviate public interest away from the physicians who prescribed for him, whether for genuine physical or psychological pain. with questionable competence and ethics. Either way, as an NP, I hope she had the professional sense/ reaction to alert one of his medical team members or at least to call 911. That, in my eyes would have salvaged and protected her as a nursing professional, a reaction to any patient crying out for help. As he sought her help through trust, so should she have responded as within an acute intervention.
    Whether MJ had or did not have the time or patience to work with his physician, or if the physician in reality had poor knowledge of pain /addiction therapy, the multitude of drugs and the number of MD's involved, the situation was ripe for disaster
  9. by   avidhunter3
    Quote from avillion23
    I completely agree with you. I don't see how everyone is pointing a finger at the NP. She is only relaying what the patient wanted her to provide, she is not disclosing that he was technically taking Diprivan. I guess everyone's perception is clouded by his celebrity. Anyone who requests a drug that harsh to fall asleep, IS a junkie, druggie, etc..... Can't be denied and frankly I am disturbed that he is being held up so much by the media as a good father and good person. Come on, one look at the dude and you can tell he had some deep psychological issues. And there isn't a doubt in my mind that he was wrongly acquitted, but that is neither here nor there.
    Just because someone has an illness, and addiction IS a disease, does NOT make them a bad father/person. They do THINGS that make them a bad father/person, but the illness itself does not. Nothing that has came out in the media so far that suggests he was a bad father OR person, in fact quite the opposite. Yes he did have a drug problem, but that doesn't mean he was a loving father to those kids, or that he wasnt a good person
  10. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Diprivan???? What the heck?


    steph

    I know, Steph!!! My thought was when they said he had been asking for Diprivan, WHAT ---!?!?!? The only times I had taken care of someone being given the drug was in ICU with a patient on the vent. I could be wrong, but have never even thought of someone at home who could do for themselves and that kind of thing taking it.

    It didn't even strike me as a drug people would abuse r/t the half life and the medical reasons for Diprivan is given, but after reading some of the posts I have read here on the subject have helped me make sense of it. I guess I had just thought more about the other drugs that people abuse and the Diprivan didn't just fit into the same category with those, like the opiates, benzos, speed, those kind of drugs.

    Anne, RNC
  11. by   nursemarion
    He probably had diprivan for plastic surgery procedures and really liked it, but because he was a layperson he did not really understand the drug. Did anyone offer him some OTC sleep aids? antihistamines knock me out with no problem. I really feel sorry for him. It sounds like he was screwed up in so many ways, and the pressures of fame kept him from getting help before it was too late. He seemed to be surrounded by people who were also wrapped up in their own fame instead of just some normal, sensible people who could help him. He needed to just go somewhere like Billings, Montana and get a real ranch and a real life. He was truly lost on the yellow brick road.
  12. by   TheRedOne
    I was watching the interview on TV, my friend was there and I told him I couldn't believe what she was saying! How is she not in trouble for breaking this confidentiality? It is my understanding that the rules of HIPAA still stand after death, and besides, we have a set code of ethics we adhere to as nursing students and nurses. Sad, she probably just wants her 15 minutes of fame.
  13. by   tlandrn
    Quote from leslie :-D
    Nutritionist: Jackson begged for sedatives for insomnia
    http://edition.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/...jackson.drugs/

    leslie
    I personally have contacted her company and notifed them of the unethical and unprofessional behavior. I understand that it is her company...hopefully she will pull herself together and behave as an ethical professional nurse!

close