No More Fingersticks for Techs!! - page 9

Is this happening where you all are? I live/work in New York City and work in a city hospital, and in the past few months, the BON sent a mandate stating that techs, CNAs, PCAs, etc...can no longer... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    The bottom line, to me is that inconsistency causes confusion. Not following what the state says causes it even more. I never said I personally agreed with the state BON's ruling, but if all facilities are not complying, and each floor is doing their own thing, it is not safe. To place all of this on the RN is insane, in my opinion because she is distracted from doing assessments and skills that neither an LPN or CNA can do.
  2. by   SteveS743
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    The bottom line, to me is that inconsistency causes confusion. Not following what the state says causes it even more. I never said I personally agreed with the state BON's ruling, but if all facilities are not complying, and each floor is doing their own thing, it is not safe. To place all of this on the RN is insane, in my opinion because she is distracted from doing assessments and skills that neither an LPN or CNA can do.
    Yeah. Those puny LPNs can do the grunt work. They aren't as good as RNs now, are they? You need to get your head out of the clouds. One day your LPN or CNA is going to catch something you missed and you're going to be be embarassed.
  3. by   cherrybreeze
    Quote from SteveS743
    Yeah. Those puny LPNs can do the grunt work. They aren't as good as RNs now, are they? You need to get your head out of the clouds. One day your LPN or CNA is going to catch something you missed and you're going to be be embarassed.

    Seriously, you're being a little sensitive here, IMO. I don't think anyone is putting LPN's or CNA's down (not in the post you're referring to, at any rate, I haven't read them ALL in detail). The OP's point is that the RN has responsibilities that the LPN and CNA cannot do, so why give them TASKS that the LPN and CNA's CAN do, skill-wise? It is NOT a difficult skill, I'm sorry, it's not. It's not like they need to interpret the results, if they put the drop of blood on the strip on the machine and then the machine says "100," that's what it says. It's the RN (or LPN) that then executes what needs to be done with that reading (give insulin or not).

    On a sidenote, I don't agree with the RN resticking them, either......I honestly don't believe, with the machines we have nowadays, that a result that's that far out of normal parameters is generally the result of user error. The machines tend to prevent that. If not enough blood is used, for example, it won't give a reading (whereas older machines might read low if the sample was too small). As I posted earlier, our CNA's go through a competency, and get checked off on the skill just the same as RN's and LPN's do. It is a TASK and can be delegated; the RN/LPN takes the appropriate action with the result.

    BTW, unless something changed (and if it did, pagandeva, my apologies).......Steve, you just made your post TO an LPN. That's why I think you're being too sensitive and reading in to the post too much.
  4. by   cherrybreeze
    OK, after I hit post, I had to go check the profile just to make sure. I wasn't trying to be mean or start a fight, hope it didn't sound that way. But yet, pagan is an LPN (and a DANG good one, from reading her posts here, if I may say so). So Steve, your anger is misdirected.

  5. by   cherrybreeze
    Quote from herring_RN
    The SAME person who does the glucose testing shoud treat the result. The people who do their own accuchecks also give themselves insulin.

    The problem is that hospitals would rather staff unsafely and assign invasive important procesures to unlicensed assistive personnel.
    Honestly, I think this is just another example of something that some RN's don't want to give up/are "possessive" about, in thinking that only they can do. We have seen a lot of this on the council that I'm on, as we review the LPN/CNA task lists. Several RN's have a hard time delegating ANYTHING. We have gone to using automatic blood pressure cuffs quite a bit more than we used to, and I'm OK with getting VS from my CNA's (and I would also be OK with it if they were doing them manually, I TRUST them, and it's within their scope of practice).

    If you have a patient on routine blood pressure meds, do you always do your own VS? If a CNA tells you a patient's temp is elevated, do you recheck it before giving them Tylenol, or whatever? I don't, necessarily. They know how to take a temperature.

    I guess you could use the argument then, that the RN should always do peri-care, too, since the CNA can't *assess* skin and therefore might miss signs of breakdown....one more thing you'd better do. Especially if they need Sensicare or some other skin barrier cream put on, right? If it has to be put on, you'd better be the one doing it, and looking at why, every time.

    I agree with the comparison to lab results. I don't have to go down to the lab and run my own CBC to believe that the Hgb is low, and that those 2 units of PRBC's need to be administered.

    A FSBG is not an invasive procedure.....
  6. by   tobesmartt
    Wow.. What is the rationale for this? We don't have a tech so the nurses LPN and RN must do. The CNA are not permitted to do this .
  7. by   JomoNurse
    my hospital sucks. RNs have to do a lot.. enemas, fingersticks, foleys, etc. The hospital next door makes their CNAs do all of that
  8. by   tobesmartt
    If you like , you may go work for the hospital next door.
    Quote from JomoNurse
    my hospital sucks. RNs have to do a lot.. enemas, fingersticks, foleys, etc. The hospital next door makes their CNAs do all of that
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from SteveS743
    Yeah. Those puny LPNs can do the grunt work. They aren't as good as RNs now, are they? You need to get your head out of the clouds. One day your LPN or CNA is going to catch something you missed and you're going to be be embarassed.
    I am an LPN. Never tried to disrespect any title. In terms of teamwork, have always done that. CNAs have looked out for me, I have looked out for them and RNs. Maybe you didn't read my logo or all of my posts.
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    Seriously, you're being a little sensitive here, IMO. I don't think anyone is putting LPN's or CNA's down (not in the post you're referring to, at any rate, I haven't read them ALL in detail). The OP's point is that the RN has responsibilities that the LPN and CNA cannot do, so why give them TASKS that the LPN and CNA's CAN do, skill-wise? It is NOT a difficult skill, I'm sorry, it's not. It's not like they need to interpret the results, if they put the drop of blood on the strip on the machine and then the machine says "100," that's what it says. It's the RN (or LPN) that then executes what needs to be done with that reading (give insulin or not).

    On a sidenote, I don't agree with the RN resticking them, either......I honestly don't believe, with the machines we have nowadays, that a result that's that far out of normal parameters is generally the result of user error. The machines tend to prevent that. If not enough blood is used, for example, it won't give a reading (whereas older machines might read low if the sample was too small). As I posted earlier, our CNA's go through a competency, and get checked off on the skill just the same as RN's and LPN's do. It is a TASK and can be delegated; the RN/LPN takes the appropriate action with the result.

    BTW, unless something changed (and if it did, pagandeva, my apologies).......Steve, you just made your post TO an LPN. That's why I think you're being too sensitive and reading in to the post too much.
    I had to laugh, because yes, I AM an LPN...one that is a team player. I feel the same as you, it is nothing wrong with assigning LPNs and CNAs to do the more mundane skills so that the RN can pay attention to the more skilled responsibilities and assessments. We can work like a well oiled machine if allowed. For sure, this person has misread my entire point. Thanks for the support...
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    OK, after I hit post, I had to go check the profile just to make sure. I wasn't trying to be mean or start a fight, hope it didn't sound that way. But yet, pagan is an LPN (and a DANG good one, from reading her posts here, if I may say so). So Steve, your anger is misdirected.

    Your compliment is greatly appreciated...believe me!
  12. by   GaMBA
    I live in Georgia and work as a tech at a hospital. We (CNAs) still do fingersticks where I work.
  13. by   jlizz69
    Our multicare techs do fingerstick accuchecks. They scan the armband and scan their namebadge. The results are immediately downloaded into the computer when the machine is placed in the holder. We do have a board that the techs write the accucheck on, but I always check the computer. Fortunately we do have good techs who relate any abnormals to us. I did not realize other places do not allow it. Our techs also draw blood and do EKG's. The EKG's do concern me sometimes depending on who does it, but I have seen nurses not place the stickers in the proper place also. I am not sure what the right answer is, but I do know that I am responsible for the patient, bottom line. Long ago we had lab techs who drew all blood, then it was designated to the nurses and then we had MCT's. RN's must draw all type and screens for blood. If the blood is drawn from a line, than of course, the nurse must do it. If the tech has gone through competency training, I do not see why they cannot do fingersticks or POC heme testing of stool. I just have to be looking for the results.
    Last edit by jlizz69 on Jun 4, '09 : Reason: wanted to add something

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