ICU Nurse to Paramedic to FireFighter?

  1. Hello,

    I was thinking about going this route, and was wondering if anyone on this forum has done the same. I guess I need to take a basic EMT class first, then I can take an RN to Paramedic bridge program. I was figuring on working as a firefighter/paramedic, and doing nursing PRN on the side to supplement my income.

    I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, but if someone could point me in the right direction, or give me any info, it would be greatly appreciated!
  2. Visit CarboneF11 profile page

    About CarboneF11

    Joined: Feb '08; Posts: 4; Likes: 1

    9 Comments

  3. by   CHATSDALE
    WELCOME TO THE BOARD
    usually the most traveled route is the opposite of what you have put dow
    many of people i have know join the fire dept and then they are trained in em/paramedic ppaid by that dept while on salary
    the bridge is then to rn, perhaps the dept will pay all or part of tution
    lick on the speciality tab above and see if you can find someone with more up to date info
  4. by   MichaelFloridaRN
    Not sure what programs are offered to train from RN to Paramedic, I guess some of the prerequisites would be the same.

    I do not see much common grounds between an RN, regardless of the place of practice, and a firefighter. I am an ICU Nurse and do not see how that would prepare me to be a firefighter at all. Seems that would be a brand new job, requiring new training. In fact I think that a firefighter would require very rigorous physical work and different critical thinking when compared to an RN.

    I see more questions about cross-training from one thing to another, and I am all for advancing in jobs, I myself went from CNA to LPN to RN, and do not intend to step on anyones feet, but I think not every thing can be cross-trained to, make sense?
  5. by   jjjoy
    I have heard of RNs who can train to work in prehospital care (paramedic role) but only here on these boards. I don't know how easy it is to find such programs in any particular locality or if every state recognizes such certification.

    I'm not sure where the firefighter part of your plan comes in. Getting into a fire department is a whole 'nother ball of wax completely, as I understand it (which isn't much, so correct me if I'm wrong).

    It wasn't clear to me. Are you already an ICU nurse and looking for a change? What about trying to get an ER position first?
  6. by   CarboneF11
    Well I'm in an ICU now, I've been there for 6 months, and don't see myself there long term. I actually got this idea after talking with a few firefighters from my area who are RN's as well. I guess they work 8-9 days a month at the firehouse, granted they are there 24 hours a day, but they still have plenty of time for some extra 12 hour shifts a month working as a nurse PRN.

    Quote from jjjoy
    I have heard of RNs who can train to work in prehospital care (paramedic role) but only here on these boards. I don't know how easy it is to find such programs in any particular locality or if every state recognizes such certification.

    I'm not sure where the firefighter part of your plan comes in. Getting into a fire department is a whole 'nother ball of wax completely, as I understand it (which isn't much, so correct me if I'm wrong).

    It wasn't clear to me. Are you already an ICU nurse and looking for a change? What about trying to get an ER position first?
  7. by   CraigB-RN
    Quote from CarboneF11
    Hello,

    I was thinking about going this route, and was wondering if anyone on this forum has done the same. I guess I need to take a basic EMT class first, then I can take an RN to Paramedic bridge program. I was figuring on working as a firefighter/paramedic, and doing nursing PRN on the side to supplement my income.

    I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, but if someone could point me in the right direction, or give me any info, it would be greatly appreciated!
    welcome. If that's what you want then go for it. I don't know any ICU nurses that have done this but I do know some ER nruses who have. They enjoy the different environment. In many cases it's so they can get a flight position at a later date.

    If you've got little or no EMS experience, you might be better served doing a normal PM program. If you don't have the experience then you won't get it in a bridge program. Start volunterring, Def get your basic EMT and go for it.
  8. by   EricJRN
    What state are you in, Carbone? The state agency that oversees EMS certification would be the one to check with, as procedures for RN-to-Paramedic vary from state to state. Qualifications for membership or employment in a fire department are even less standardized and generally vary by department as rather than by state.
  9. by   presuppose
    I think you should go for it, Carbone. Sounds like you have the stamina! You'd be great no matter the crisis:wink2:.
    The most interesting people I've worked with are those who have 'crossed the lines' so to speak - they were medics or emts or paramedics first then got into the big wonderful world of nursing. For you to go in the other direction is completely cool too. Someone here mentioned flight nursing - you' d be groomed for that as well.
  10. by   aeronursenj
    Quote from presuppose
    I think you should go for it, Carbone. Sounds like you have the stamina! You'd be great no matter the crisis:wink2:.
    The most interesting people I've worked with are those who have 'crossed the lines' so to speak - they were medics or emts or paramedics first then got into the big wonderful world of nursing. For you to go in the other direction is completely cool too. Someone here mentioned flight nursing - you' d be groomed for that as well.
    My dream job eventually, a flight nurse. Good luck with it and keep us posted. AM wondering if maybe that would be a way to go for myself as well?
  11. by   domvig
    I know that in NYC if you're a emt or anything like that, you are bumped up on the fdny list by a lot.
    I also know some nurses that suggested taking the firefighting test, becoming a firefighter, work 2 24 hour shifts a week, becoming a nurse and being a retired firefighter in 20 years.

    so on the time scale there

    EMT, or similar that gives fdny list bump.
    Become Firefighter. work 2 days a week.
    Become RN.
    Retire in 20 years.
    collect retirement and work as nurse.
    if you start young you can retire in your 40s.
    this was suggested by a nurse (actually today)
    because of the wear and tear on the body when you're a nurse vs the pay isnt perfect.
    This way you retire early, and when you're an rn at 40 you don't have to strain yourself as much,
    preventing other bodily problems.

    oh and in fdny being a firefighter isnt the only job option.

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