I need some Advice/ Help

  1. I am a new nurse, but not to the medical field. I have been an EMT for over twelve years and worked in the both in the ER and NICU as a Tech/ clerk for the last five. I know I come off a very confident; I want to be confident when I enter that patient's room. That is why I spend time reading up on patient's medical condition ether that I don't know much about or want to know more. I do not ask for help on things that I can figure out myself. I don't enter a patient's room thinking that "Gee I wonder if I can start that IV on that difficult patient", I go in there knowing I can, and if I can not, I ask for help. I refuse to act passive or unsure of myself as a nurse. I tent to feel that some want me to act that way.
    The problem is that I have been approached by a co-worker that the "WORD is" that I am arrogant and that I do not ask for help. The thing is that I know that I do not know everything and I would be the first to say it, and there is not a shift that goes by I don't ask a question or learn some thing new. Even my preceptor was up set by this statement. So how do I handle this situation? I find it very insulting and frustrating because I can not defend myself against this gossip.
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    About jbluehorseh

    Joined: Nov '08; Posts: 133; Likes: 166
    Tele Nurse; from US
    Specialty: Chemo

    4 Comments

  3. by   Whispera
    People always talk about other people, sadly. I'd wonder about the motives of the person who approached you. Who has said you're arrogant and don't ask for help? The boss? Coworkers? I'd be tempted to find out who says it and talk with them about it, using the same words you put in your posting. Maybe someone is just jealous of you....
  4. by   caliotter3
    Don't pay attention to the gossip. It is sad. The only opinions that should matter to you is your's, your preceptor's, and in each case, your patient's. Other students don't matter a nit to you. Don't let them bother you.
  5. by   linda1959
    The fact that your preceptor cannot understand why this is being said is a good thing, because it shows that you are not making mistakes because you are not asking.

    Your post reminds me of a position I was in many years ago. I was an experienced peds. hem/onc nurse. My hospital closed and I was able to get another position at a different hospital. Unfortunately, my preceptor decided that I needed to learn everything over again, rather than just learn what they did different. She did not even approve of steps I took to assess my patient, and I was also a former PICU nurse. I was criticised for not asking enough questions, so was given no credit for what I already knew.

    Your confidence is not something that is typically seen in new nurses, but then, many new nurses do not have the background you do. I suspect whoever is gossiping is feeling a bit threatened and territorial by your knowledge.

    Continue to use your preceptor for support and hopefully over time, whoever is talking, will value you for your experience.

    Good Luck!
  6. by   GOMER42
    It is good to be confident, but as a patient I would rather have you ask a question than "figure it out" at my bedside. Confidence can be good, but arrogance can be dangerous.

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