How to gain respect

  1. Hello, I am a new nurse (LPN) and have been at my job in the nursing home for three months now. I try my hardest to be fair to everyone and treat them all equally but some days are harder than others. I feel like I have no respite with some of my CNAs since I am younger than most of them. They do what they want no matter who tells them the way that it is supposed to be done. I don't want to be "that" nurse who is mean all of the time but I do not know what to do anymore. It is only certain staff. Mainly ones who have been there a long time. The other ones I feel trust and respect me but what do I do about these select few? Thanks for the advice in advance!
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    About Dreamer308

    Joined: Sep '18; Posts: 1

    9 Comments

  3. by   missmollie
    The CNAs have been doing their job for longer than you've been a nurse, and likely do not need your direction. Start your shift by talking with your CNA and telling them "I know you know what you're doing, and I'm glad you're on my shift. Let me know if you need help with anything, and I'll do the same".

    Lift them up. Tell them they did a great job at the end of a shift. Pick up some of the slack, and if you need vitals signs and it's not an emergent need, get them yourself. If you have time, help them turn and change patients.

    It's difficult to be a CNA with a nurse who doesn't trust their work. If you trust them, they'll start to trust you. A lot of this is going to take time, but in the meantime let them know you trust in their ability to do their job.
  4. by   Been there,done that
    You are the nurse delegating to the CNA's. They are working under your license and you are responsible for what they do, do not do, or do not follow policy and procedures for.
    Respect must be earned. Look them straight in the eye and tell them what you expect. If they do not follow your direction, write them up.. each and every time.
  5. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from missmollie
    The CNAs have been doing their job for longer than you've been a nurse, and likely do not need your direction. Start your shift by talking with your CNA and telling them "I know you know what you're doing, and I'm glad you're on my shift. Let me know if you need help with anything, and I'll do the same".

    Lift them up. Tell them they did a great job at the end of a shift. Pick up some of the slack, and if you need vitals signs and it's not an emergent need, get them yourself. If you have time, help them turn and change patients.

    It's difficult to be a CNA with a nurse who doesn't trust their work. If you trust them, they'll start to trust you. A lot of this is going to take time, but in the meantime let them know you trust in their ability to do their job.
    "They do what they want no matter who tells them the way that it is supposed to be done." How do you trust that?

    Completely disagree with your suggestion. The more she kisses their tookas, the more they will walk all over her.
  6. by   missmollie
    Quote from Been there,done that
    "They do what they want no matter who tells them the way that it is supposed to be done." How do you trust that?

    Completely disagree with your suggestion. The more she kisses their tookas, the more they will walk all over her.
    It took me respecting my CNAs in order to be respected. I love your posts and what you post Been there done that, but in this matter I think I'm right.
  7. by   Neats
    The best thing you can do is to be firm, fair and consistent.

    As the licensed nurse you have the responsibility to ensure the NA-C are getting their work done. End of story. It should not matter how long they have been there but for your facility this does play a factor so I would use this to my advantage and designate those ones to report to me about specific things I want completed on our shift. You have to be careful with this so as not to place them in a supervisor role. Items like when all the showers have been complete I just want one person to let me know, let me know what documentation has been completed from the meal, if there are gaps then you can go to that person. The trick is trying to make everyone feel included but you remain the supervisor. Let them all know we are counting on each other to complete the work. Encourage the older NA-C to share and impart their knowledge of the resident onto the new ones and praise the older ones i.e. thank you for showing Jane how to take care of Mrs XX, she is particular and your hard work is paying off as Mrs XX is doing well with our new staff.
    If you are having issues then address it right away, let them know you need that information before a certain time and if they do not show up go find them. If they are on break then you need to let them know you had a specific time RANGE and if it happens again then you will have to write this up because it is patient safety you are focusing on.
    Follow through is the hardest part of the job but it is the most important.
  8. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from missmollie
    It took me respecting my CNAs in order to be respected. I love your posts and what you post Been there done that, but in this matter I think I'm right.
    I am not reading anything in OP's post that indicates disrespect. I always respected everyone I worked with.

    When I was working in the same facility for years.. there was no issues with the CNA's. Went to agency and travel nursing... and the picture changed. Long standing assistants will challenge a new nurse.

    I know how to kiss up and I know how to write up. If the CNA does not follow my direction... A write up is the ONLY way to get respect.
  9. by   Chrispy11
    The title of this thread us "How to Gain Respect." I worked as a CNA in that environment and learned more from the long time CNAs than I did the new nurses. It's not that they're disrespectful, it's that they didn't job switch for more money like many CNAs have to do and know the ins and outs of the place sometimes better than new management. Many a new DON relied on them. They've been there years to your three months. Writing someone up is not going to get them to respect you. If anything, I've seen that done and it didn't produce the hoped for results. Came in to find the new nurse gone. This was my first CNA job and I've seen this happen more than once and at different employers.

    If anything... A little bribery in the way of baked goods, might ease the way. Leave it in the lunch room with a thank you note. I know I'm going to get jumped on for that suggestion, but having been both... Sometimes a little gesture goes a long way. I'm finding to be authoritative but ask for help. It shows them you respect their knowledge and respect is a two way street.
  10. by   Dreamer380
    I do show respect for them but when I have every single cna complainkng about a specific one (who is the main one that I am referring to) as she only helps specific people and as I am talking with her trying to figure out what is done and what still needs to be done and as I am talking she literally turns around and walks away mumbling. She walks past call lights and literally disappears. There will be like 6 call lights going off and she's outside watering flowers. I answer call lights and help her out people to bed when she gets behind. She helps me and I show my gratitude and I help her and I get snarky comments about how she had to put more people to bed. I can't win no matter what I do.
  11. by   NightNerd
    What kinds of things are we taking about specifically? Is it stuff that is fairly innocuous, or things that are more about patients' safety, comfort, and dignity? An example would be helpful if you think you can provide one.

    Generally, I have found it most helpful to pick my battles when getting this kind of reaction, especially when I'm new to a group of coworkers. I try to see what the routine is and generally fall in line with it, but when there is something that genuinely needs to be done in a certain way, I'll advocate for it and give my rationale. Most reasonable people can accept changes when they see a good reason for it. If not and you still feel something is an issue, maybe bring a neutral third party into it - not as a punitive or competitive thing, but as a way of ensuring that everyone is on the same page about what is best for the patient.

    Are there other nurses you can ask about this? Sometimes it made me feel better to get other people's advice on how to approach someone - or just to hear them say, "Uggghhhh, they do that with everyone, it's not just you." Doesn't change a lot, but at least you know it's not personal and you can go about your business.

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