Giving last name in report - page 4

In school, I was taught to chart the first initial, last name, and license of the nurse receiving Pt care. This was explained that if the chart was called into court and I gave report to Brittany... Read More

  1. by   wondern
    I agree with Susie2310 wholeheartedly. Not giving your last name or signing a chart with your first name only seems totally ignorant. It's a blatant lack of accountability, professionalism, legality, etc.
    I would not work in a place that thinks my work is as important as signing only my first name.
    What did Forests' mom tell him, "Stupid is as stupid does!"?
    It's not like I'm your cable tv customer service rep and won't give my last name.
    I certainly hope to never be a patient in a popsicle stand like that!
  2. by   psu_213
    Quote from Susie2310
    I guess when I or my family member are a patient, I will have to make sure I ask the nurse at the beginning of their shift for their full name.
    I'm curious to know what percentage of nurses would give out that information without further prodding...I know of nurses that would fall on their swords rather than give out their last names. Not saying it's right to not give out a last name, but they are under this misguided belief that a patient/family will never know their last names if they themselves [the nurses] cover it up on their name badges and then do not reveal it to patients.
  3. by   psu_213
    Quote from wondern
    I agree with Susie2310 wholeheartedly. Not giving your last name or signing a chart with your first name only seems totally ignorant. It's a blatant lack of accountability, professionalism, legality, etc.
    I never did understand why nurses thought that they had a special right to not have their last names known (with certain limited exceptions, such as psych). To go back to a discussion a while ago on AN, would a judge be able to sentence someone to life in prison and say "I am Judge Frank...you don't get to know my last name?" Could a doctor say "I am going to do you heart surgery. I am Dr. Lisa--my last name is not important? Then why is it a nurse can, who is about to push a paralytic or some other potential dangerous med can say "I am nurse Sally, you don't get to know my last name." Someone can make whatever arguments they want about stalking and about not knowing what crazy lengths a patient will go to, but, sorry, a patient has a right to know the name of the person caring for them.
  4. by   cleback
    In my setting, it would be overkill. Nurses sign in and out, are documenting throughout the shift... if there is ever a legal case, everyone's name will be clearly visible.

    I also do a lot of telephone communication on my other job. If I need exact information that is critical for care, I ask for a fax, which will have names on it.

    The only situation I could see where you'd want a first and last name documented is if you are getting someone from the er... and it's a particularly crazy night so another nurse who has not been involved in care, calls report to the floor. Happens on occasion but they usually don't advertise it either. That's a sketchier situation where you may want to document who exactly gave you report.
  5. by   Susie2310
    Quote from psu_213
    I'm curious to know what percentage of nurses would give out that information without further prodding...I know of nurses that would fall on their swords rather than give out their last names. Not saying it's right to not give out a last name, but they are under this misguided belief that a patient/family will never know their last names if they themselves [the nurses] cover it up on their name badges and then do not reveal it to patients.
    I ask the nurse, "Could you please tell me your full name so that we know the name of the nurse who is caring for me/my family member?" I ask the nurse to spell their first and last names. If the nurse prevaricates, I mention that we have the legal right to know the full name of the nurse providing care for me/my family member. If the nurse is still not forthcoming with their full name, the next step is to ask to talk to the Charge nurse, and so on.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on May 1
  6. by   LovingLife123
    I guess that me signing into my charting and charting my assessment should show I'm caring for the patient. Do you chart who you hand off report to while on break?

    Who is responsible for the patient while you exchange report?

    To me it seems silly. I click on a box that I have reviewed the chart with the other nurse before they leave. It takes me one second to do.

    Maybe my system is as bad as I thought it was. I read too many instances of people charting detailed notes. I click boxes and only add a note if absolutely needed. Nothing more, nothing less.
  7. by   LovingLife123
    Quote from Susie2310
    I ask the nurse, "Could you please tell me your full name so that we know the name of the nurse who is caring for me/my family member?" I ask the nurse to spell their first and last names. If the nurse prevaricates, I mention that we have the legal right to know the full name of the nurse providing care for me/my family member. If the nurse is still not forthcoming with their full name, the next step is to ask to talk to the Charge nurse, and so on.

    Please provide the law that states I must give anyone my last name? I have never ever given a patient my last name.

    If there is a question with my care and a patient decides to sue, their lawyer can get all my pertinent info from my employer. I know of no law that requires me to reveal my full name to patients.
  8. by   socal1
    You have never ever given a patient your last name? Do you guys wear badges at your hospital? Or do you work at a pysch ward? I am pretty sure all of the nurses that work in hospitals in CA must wear badges that identify who they are, now in a mental health facility/er they may put tape over the last name portion but every where else it must be shown...
  9. by   Susie2310
    Quote from LovingLife123
    Please provide the law that states I must give anyone my last name? I have never ever given a patient my last name.

    If there is a question with my care and a patient decides to sue, their lawyer can get all my pertinent info from my employer. I know of no law that requires me to reveal my full name to patients.
    I was taught in nursing school that a patient has the legal right to know the first and last name of the nurse caring for them. If a patient or their representative requests to know my full name, I am required by law to tell them this, and they are not required to go through my employer to obtain this information. To my knowledge, this applies in other states too, as Muno mentioned. In the case of an RN, a patient or member of the public has the independent right to file a complaint about a Registered Nurse with their state Board of Registered Nursing, whose main role is the protection of the public. Nurses licensure information is posted online on their state BON web site for the protection of the PUBLIC. A patient or member of the public has the independent right to look up my licensure information. In order to look up my licensure information, they need to know my first and last name. My first and last name are not private information if I am working in my professional role as a licensed nurse, and anyone who knows my name and knows I am a nurse can look up my license.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on May 1
  10. by   MunoRN
    Quote from LovingLife123
    Please provide the law that states I must give anyone my last name? I have never ever given a patient my last name.

    If there is a question with my care and a patient decides to sue, their lawyer can get all my pertinent info from my employer. I know of no law that requires me to reveal my full name to patients.
    It's a documented condition of licensure in every state, you are a publicly licensed professional which means those receiving your care or their representatives have a legal right to inquire about your licensure status, to review action taken against your license, and to bring complaints directly to your licensing board with having to go through your employer. There are some exceptions, such as mental health, although in those situations there still needs to be a legally designated proxy that patients can bring issues to.

    My state sends out a long list of actions they've taken in the last month, which has become my routine toilet-time reading. "Refusal to identify" is not an uncommon reason for warnings against licenses.
    Last edit by MunoRN on May 1
  11. by   oceangirl1234
    Sorry if this has been said...skimmed over majority of the comments. But as a nurse, your name is public knowledge...i.e. they can look up your license number and verify that you in fact have a nursing license. Don't know why someone would get so worked up over this.
  12. by   KelRN215
    I just thought of a situation in which I was regularly asked my last name when working in the hospital- when the lab called panic results in. They still butchered the spelling every time, even though I spelled it out for them.

    I did once have a CPS worker refuse to give me his first name when he accepted a report of neglect that I filed. He said "I only go my Mr. Jones" (or whatever his last name was) and directed me to address the written report my state requires that we follow-up with to him in that way.
  13. by   NoctuRNalED
    I get first name, last name and title of whoever I give report to on any patient that is being transferred. It's our ER policy that we document it, as well as documenting the first and last name of the accepting physician. Is it overkill? Perhaps but our hospital is super strict about EMTALA documentation and these are part of our required documentation. I've never had anyone not tell me their last name. I usually ask by saying, "Can I get your last name for my chart?" Never had a problem.

    Giving report to another floor in our hospital it's first names only and sometimes a last initial.

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