Fired for Falsifying Documents. What to expect - page 12

Today is extremely difficulty for me. I just started this new job that I absolutely love. I work in a very busy hallway and popped a noon med for one of my residents. I placed it in the med cart and... Read More

  1. by   rldubz
    In my state, the BON sends us a monthly email of all of the "corrective actions" taken against individual nurses. Considering the kind of stuff many of these nurses have done and still kept their license, I think you'll probably be fine. If I read correctly, the meds were Tylenol and Gabapentin? This doesn't sound too major.
  2. by   Davey Do
    Quote from LadysSolo
    I would actually recommend (and I know I will probably get repercussions for this) that you NOT write people up again. When I worked in the hospital, writing someone up usually led to "write-up wars." Go talk to the person that could be written up instead. It is a little tougher, but in the long run less trouble for everyone.
    Well, LadysSolo, you might just get reinforcement for this, as I agree with your tact.

    Fact is, this subject came up in a discussion last shift. I jokingly told and LPN that I was going to write her up. Then I seriously said that I wouldn't tell anybody that I was going to write them up.

    The few times I have written a peer or coworker up, I attempted to deal with the problem face to face. If the problem could not be rectified, I would then inform them, "You will have to deal with the ramifications of your actions or inactions".
  3. by   Leader25
    As long as it was not a narcotic ,you will probably get a warning,own up to but do not beat yourself up.It is done and you will remember this not to do it again.If you repeat this the discipline will be progressive ,and might ask you to leave . So be careful ,it is a good lesson,it is never a good idea to prechart the future.Remember you can not even leave a vitamin even at the bedside,and there are cameras everywhere.Best of luck.
  4. by   Cream and sugar LPN
    Quote from LPNewbie
    Meds are supposed to be given according to the day. For example. When you get a blister pack, you get 30. We get fresh packs on the first of each month. So therefore, on day 1, we pop pill 30. On day 2, we pop pill 29. And so on. I noticed that in the evening spot, some meds were not being popped. Furthermore, on the days I WAS OFF, I saw that some pills were not popped. So when they saw my pills in the top drawer, they assumed this was me who messed the carts up.
    This is uncalled for and ridiculous! Who reported you? Nighttime meds were not popped and they decided it was because of you? Nonsense. If I ever find a cup with meds left from last shift I would mention that to that nurse next time I saw her- unless it was Tylenol and honestly for that I would just go about my business. It sounds like they were looking for a reason to get rid of you. In the long run, it's best because who needs this type of stress where coworkers throw each other under the bus. Brush yourself off and move on.
  5. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from LPNewbie
    Our ED was fired and one of the nurses became ED. Her best friend made a bunch of med errors and I had to report it. Today I get fired for meds..
    You may want to talk to a lawyer.
  6. by   Glycerine82
    It was your mistake, you thought you gave it. End of story.

    This is the problem with paper MARs.
  7. by   amillion3147
    Stop worrying about the board taking your license. This is coming from a PT who was reported(myself) to NC state board as retalition for exposing issues in the our workplace and standing up for pts when they weren't getting proper care from staff. I was working with along with my friend who is an OT who was basically doing the same thing. Management didn't like that and was out to get both of us and they found the perfect opportunity where the both of us where working with patients in a group to get us all in trouble. Long story short after I resigned and she resigned they reported us both to each of our boards for different things. Mine said I was verbally abusive to a patient which is hardly the truth and was a flat out lie. I forgot what hers was for. I was like and got all upset and worrying but then I realized I had nothing to worry about as I knew what was being said was not the truth. They basically got several employees to make up false allegations and the stories just did not add up when the state came out to investigate and interview witnesses. I called the state board of PT and spoke with the director and was basically told not to worry about anything as anyone can make an complaint and the board will do a thorough investigation and get to the truth. I like you reached out to the board before the complaint ever came through because I had a feeling it was a witchhunt so I told them my version of the situation. About 3 months later they dismissed the whole case and situation because they discovered the staff was actually retaliating against me. License still stayed in good standing. My point is stop worrying if you know you did nothing wrong in terms of malice or ill will to the patient.
  8. by   middleagednurse
    Quote from LPNewbie
    I've been in denial about my issues. I've spoken to therapist who urge me to take my medicine but I hate taking it because it makes me feel like I'm a crazy person. But I know that I need it.
    If you had diabetes would you take insulin if your doc prescribed it? If you had cardiac problems would you take the prescribed meds? You have been prescribed meds to help you function better. Try taking them.
  9. by   Natural-minded
    LPNnewbie: I haven't read all the comments on this post, but I was browsing your post about the 3 jobs in 2 years and unable to comment on that one. I'm sorry you're having such a hard time!! I just wanted to pass along this article and hopefully spark your curiosity for things beyond traditional medicine. It probably sounds funny for a nurse to say "look beyond what the doctors say," but I've had a lot of health problems, and food and natural supplements have helped me way more than any prescription drugs or regular doctor advice. Besides that, Dr. Human is a fully trained MD and thus brings enormous knowledge to the table between his training and his holistic research. I wish you all the best!!

    6 Strategies to Eliminate Depression - Dr. Mark Hyman
  10. by   broughden
    Quote from LPNewbie
    I've been in denial about my issues. I've spoken to therapist who urge me to take my medicine but I hate taking it because it makes me feel like I'm a crazy person. But I know that I need it.
    THIS explains ALL the threads this poster has made. I wonder if they're even really a nurse.
  11. by   NurseScorpio88
    Quote from LPNewbie
    It was 2 tylenol and one gabapentin. When I said I had issues with meds, I was referring to a previous job. This job I have never made ONE mistake. Not one. I am so sad and frustrated. Our ED was fired and one of the nurses became ED. Her best friend made a bunch of med errors and I had to report it. Today I get fired for meds. I mean make no mistake. I messed up. I should've double checked. But I felt like this was extremely harsh.
    I've done the same thing, not just once. This can happen because sometimes when you go to a patients room either they are not there -- with Rehab or was asleep. Did your higher ups said anything to you about reporting you to the BON? If not then I would not worry about it. BON are more concerned with Narcs being dispense, not that I'm saying it is okay to leave meds on the cart but what I learned was is to check my drawers before leaving.

    I know it's easier said than done, but start anew. What happened, happened. Use this situation as a reminder for you not to make the same mistake again.
  12. by   cayenne06
    Quote from Natural-minded
    t probably sounds funny for a nurse to say "look beyond what the doctors say," but I've had a lot of health problems, and food and natural supplements have helped me way more than any prescription drugs or regular doctor advice. Besides that, Dr. Human is a fully trained MD and thus brings enormous knowledge to the table between his training and his holistic research. I wish you all the best!!

    6 Strategies to Eliminate Depression - Dr. Mark Hyman

    A healthy diet and lifestyle is key to mental health. And identifying underlying medical problems such as hypothyroid are also important. Not everyone needs medicine, or even counseling. This is all inarguable. However, medicine and counseling are both proven treatments for mental health disorders. To argue anything else is legitimately dangerous.

    That article is full of false and misleading information, scattered with common sense, completely mainstream recommendations. His list at the end is just the normal recommendations that any health care provider would give to their patients. Nothing "alternative" about it. Well, except for the supplement nonsense, and the blatant promotion of his OWN PRODUCTS.



    *PLEASE* do not rely on Dr Hyman. He is a quack of the highest order.
    Mark Hyman – Science-Based Medicine
    Last edit by cayenne06 on Mar 20

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