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Fired two months into nurse residency

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I was recently fired from my first job as a nurse during the first two months of my new grad program. Basically I was fired because I couldn't handle patient care on my own even though I was only taking care for 1-2 patients (by no means was this for bad behavior, or due to a poor relationship with anyone in the facility). I don't know what to do or if I am even capable of feeling at the moment. It's not like I wasn't given coaching/warnings. I simply couldn't handle the job as far as time management/prioritization/knowing how to complete tasks. Any advise? As much as I want to, I don't know if I can/should even continue nursing from here because it's not like I was fired for disobedience or anything like that (which I would honestly find easier to handle)...

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 40 years experience.

This is my big beef with nursing schools. They really don't address time management and as you have seen, it's hugely important. For this reason, a lot of employers have longer residency/orientation programs and do not expect you to be up and running in two months.

Dust yourself off and start applying for other jobs. Try to find one that offers a bit more new grad support.

Meanwhile, what do you think got in your way for time-management? Some common sticking points: 1. You really need to develop a worksheet that works for you. It functions as your report sheet and your to-do list.

2. Learn to extricate yourself diplomatically and promptly from chit-chatty patients.

3. When you do your beginning-of-shift assessments, try to look unhurried and spend a bit of time (that you don't really have) listening to each patient. This pays huge dividends making them feel at ease and cared for. Cuts way down on anxiety-related call-light use for the rest of your shift.

Don't give up just yet. I think you can do this.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 28 years experience.

3 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

This is my big beef with nursing schools. They really don't address time management and as you have seen, it's hugely important.

Nursing schools are now worried about teaching to the NCLEX to get that all important pass rate, and expecting the employer to teach time management and skills development. Employers expect the schools to teach this and there is a large island in between that some residencies cover, some don't. I blame the schools-students are paying good money to learn, they are being failed. I got the learning portion and the skills/time management in my program almost 30 years ago

Edited by Hoosier_RN

Kitiger, RN

Specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics. Has 42 years experience.

4 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

1. You really need to develop a worksheet that works for you. It functions as your report sheet and your to-do list.

2. Learn to extricate yourself diplomatically and promptly from chit-chatty patients.

3. When you do your beginning-of-shift assessments, try to look unhurried and spend a bit of time (that you don't really have) listening to each patient. This pays huge dividends making them feel at ease and cared for. Cuts way down on anxiety-related call-light use for the rest of your shift.

Don't give up just yet. I think you can do this.

Excellent advice, TriciaJ, especially the last two. Those would have helped me, back when. (I had the worksheet down.)

It was easier for me because I had worked as a nurse's aide for a year or so before starting nursing school. (We called it nurse's training back then!)

A lot of new-nurse stress is made worse because of how schools are now. I graduated from a diploma school; we had LOTS of practice at time management. Schools now-a-days don't even teach all the skills you will need.

Short cake, this stunned you, maybe you feel in shock. Take a few days to do whatever gives you peace. Start to recover. Then go and find a new job. This has happened to so many new nurses; you are not alone.

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

On 7/5/2020 at 8:01 AM, Kitiger said:

A lot of new-nurse stress is made worse because of how schools are now. I graduated from a diploma school; we had LOTS of practice at time management.

I am still so surprised at how much time hospitals devote to a new nurses residency. But I agree the clinical portion of a nursing student's education has changed so much. Prior to graduation from a diploma program (1980s) we had three 8 hour days of clinical a week and patients stayed longer. It was not unheard of for a student to have the same patient(s) for all 3 days. I did not teach leadership so I don't know how assignments for that were made, but in oncology nursing each student took 3 patients and usually every patient on the floor was assigned. If the patient was being d/c'd they had to meet "nursing patient" guidelines for discharge besides MDs. Had to have had a bowel movement, pain controlled with out any medication (or a minimal amount of a po med) eating well, sutures out, and no temp.

And some programs have a "preceptor" experience and the instructor is just "on call"

Nursing is a practice discipline and a student needs to practice it.

Fast forward to now..students have (1) 12 hour day a week. Patient stay is so short, students really don't get to see much patient progress