Finding A Job After An Accelerated BSN Program

Nurses Career Support

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accelerated-bsn-help-job-search.jpg.9167508872c0b5ea4eebcfb42b550fd2.jpg

I plan to apply for some accelerated BSN programs as well as some traditional second bachelor's degree programs here in California (like CSULB, CSU Chico, Sac State, CSU San Marcos etc.), and they all vary in length. I was just wondering, for anyone who has completed an accelerated program, how difficult was it to find a job after graduation? Also, do you think programs that are 15 months prepare you for the actual job, and will employers look down on your application if you did a 15 month A-BSN program? 

Tiffanye004

4 Posts

I just realized this was probably not the correct thread to post this in, I should’ve posted it in a different thread I apologize! But I would still appreciate any advice! Thank you guys

Short answer, no.

Long answer -- In MOST job markets a BSN is a BSN. There might be an existing stigma around accelerated programs but based on the job market around me, there should not be any disadvantage of having an ABSN vs a BSN. When looking at new-grad specialty placements/residencies a typical 4-year BSN new grad might have an advantage over you if they worked as a CNA/LNA/tech in that specialty and you did not have any work experience because of the rigor/accelerated program. But that really is the nitty-gritty resume discrepancies and less of a program discrepancy. 

Tiffanye004

4 Posts

On 6/23/2022 at 2:26 PM, alwaystachy said:

Short answer, no.

Long answer -- In MOST job markets a BSN is a BSN. There might be an existing stigma around accelerated programs but based on the job market around me, there should not be any disadvantage of having an ABSN vs a BSN. When looking at new-grad specialty placements/residencies a typical 4-year BSN new grad might have an advantage over you if they worked as a CNA/LNA/tech in that specialty and you did not have any work experience because of the rigor/accelerated program. But that really is the nitty-gritty resume discrepancies and less of a program discrepancy. 

Thank you so much for your response! I just got my CNA license and am hoping to start working soon so hopefully that will give me an advantage. 

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

4,161 Posts

Specializes in NICU.

I went through a ABSN program. My diploma and license is identical to someone that went through the school's traditional BSN program. 

Specializes in ED RN, Firefighter/Paramedic.
On 6/22/2022 at 7:40 PM, Tiffanye004 said:

accelerated-bsn-help-job-search.jpg.9167508872c0b5ea4eebcfb42b550fd2.jpg

I plan to apply for some accelerated BSN programs as well as some traditional second bachelor’s degree programs here in California (like CSULB, CSU Chico, Sac State, CSU San Marcos etc.), and they all vary in length. I was just wondering, for anyone who has completed an accelerated program, how difficult was it to find a job after graduation? Also, do you think programs that are 15 months prepare you for the actual job, and will employers look down on your application if you did a 15 month A-BSN program? 

In my last semester of my ADN program we had to do a resume/cover letter and a career counseling session.

I made a joke to my instructor that I could write my name on a piece of paper, in crayon, misspelled, and still land an RN job.  He didn't think it was very funny.

A week later, I emailed the RN recruiter at a local hospital system at 7pm that I was about to graduate, included my resume and cover letter, and that I was after an ED position.  She replied to me 5 minutes later (in the evening) to set up a phone interview for the following morning.  The purpose of that was to set up an in person interview the following Monday, where I met with the ED directors who basically hired me on the spot.  6 days from my application, 2 months before graduation, I had a job offer in hand.

All of my friends from class have also secured jobs.

TL:Dr - It's a good time to get an RN degree, I seriously doubt you have any problems getting a job because you chose an accelerated program.

 

 

Specializes in CVICU/Flight Nursing.
On 6/29/2022 at 12:41 PM, FiremedicMike said:

TL:Dr - It's a good time to get an RN degree, I seriously doubt you have any problems getting a job because you chose an accelerated program.

I agree, you shouldn't have a problem at all. I have worked with some new nurses with accelerated BSNs and it never even came up during their interviews. 

Specializes in ER.

Hey I did an ABSN and my degree is exactly the same. I did my program in CA, so finding a job as a new grad was already very difficult, regardless where I went to school. What I found made the most difference was where you did your clinicals. The students that did clinicals at hospitals that actually hire new grads or have a new grad program had a greater advantage of getting a job. Like others have said, being a tech or CNA also will be incredibly beneficial. Just keep in mind it is difficult to work while in an ABSN program. I know a few people did in my class, but I really needed the extra time to study as being an adult learner it took me a tad longer to retain things. Good luck!

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