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Final year of HS in the US, want to go to Nursing school in the Philippines.

Hi everyone, as my days in High School come to a close, I have finally decided on what career path I want to take, and that is nursing. I'm considering going back to my birth country, which is the Philippines, to take my schooling for nursing. My question is, will I be able to transfer the nursing degree there to here in the US when I do decide to come back? Close friends who's parents have some type of Medical Degree that they earned in the Philippines told me that I'll just need to take the state exam for nursing in the state I wish to reside in to get my license when I have a foreign degree, but I've read on here that it may not be applicable? Can I get some clarification on what can happen to my degree upon my return to the US and is there any quick solutions besides retaking nursing school tp meet US Standards in the field?

There is an entire forum section where this situation, and similar, are discussed. In a short statement, you are asking for a lot of extra effort and wasted time on your part if you want to eventually return to practice nursing in the US. If dealing with a state like CA, you may not even be able to get a license if you don't do your due diligence about the concurrency issue. It seems that nursing schools in the Philippines have not been keen on meeting the known requirements for US licensure, all of this at the expense of their graduates. You would do well to do a lot of reading here about the problems that graduates from foreign nursing programs have had in getting US nursing licenses. Best wishes.

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 5 years experience.

It has been stated many times when this question comes up. Go to school in the country where you plan to get a job. It will be far less hassle to get a job in the US with a US nursing degree.

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 32 years experience.

Regardless on where you trained you will have to sit NCLEX, if not sat already with Canada, if you want to register and work as a nurse in the US. Training outside the US means you have other stuff to do before the state will make a decision on allowing you to sit NCLEX

Regardless on where you trained you will have to sit NCLEX, if not sat already with Canada, if you want to register and work as a nurse in the US. Training outside the US means you have other stuff to do before the state will make a decision on allowing you to sit NCLEX

OP, it also means that the you will be an IEN, internationally educated nurse, for your entire career in the US, and will have additional paperwork and hoops to jump through any time you want to apply for licensure by endorsement in an additional state for the rest of your career, and no additional nursing education completed later in the US, other than completing another pre-licensure nursing program from scratch, will change that (since licensure decisions, in all US states, are based on where you completed your original nursing education that prepared you for licensure).

As Guy notes, it always makes the most sense to study nursing where you plan on practicing nursing.

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

Go to nursing school in the country in which you intend to practice.

Thank you all for your quick reply! New to this site and didnt know the appropriate forum to put my question. Read alll your comments and saw that it would be difficult to even meet US requirements with a foreign degrees. That said, anyone know a great scholarship programs for aspiring Male Nurses? Thanks for your help!

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