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Families Saying "No" To Male Nurses?

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by moretonel moretonel (Member) Member

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Is it difficult for a male LPN to be given a regularly scheduled assignment. How many families in your agency have said "no" to male nurses?

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Do not work in the agency office so can not speak to how many, if any, families reject male nurses. As a field nurse in extended care, have yet to meet a male nurse who has stated that he has been rejected from a case because of his gender. If anything, just as in facilities, male nurses seem to garner more respect and longevity on cases. At least that is what I have observed.

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On 7/12/2019 at 9:22 PM, ventmommy said:

I fired a male nurse and it had NOTHING to do with gender and everything to do with him sucking as a nurse.

I appreciate the response, but you did not address what I was asking. I asked if a potential client would not even ACCEPT CARE FROM A MALE NURSE. You do not fit in that category, you DID accept from a male nurse.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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a patient can refuse care from any caregiver that they wish, for any reason.  And to be able to bill and collect funds, most healthcare agencies will accommodate the patient and provide a caregiver that will meet the request of patient.  The only time that I've ever seen the request shut down was when it was sexually driven.  Use your imagination

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1 hour ago, Hoosier_RN said:

a patient can refuse care from any caregiver that they wish, for any reason.  And to be able to bill and collect funds, most healthcare agencies will accommodate the patient and provide a caregiver that will meet the request of patient.  The only time that I've ever seen the request shut down was when it was sexually driven.  Use your imagination

I completely understand that a patient can refuse care from any caregiver for any reason, I'm not arguing against it. I've been a CNA and Patient Care Tech, and came across several no-male-aid patients, no offense taken. As an LPN of 2 years at 2 LTC/rehab, only one resident no male nurse, no offense taken.

I'm about to start part-time home health shift care. I was just trying to get a sense of how often an assignment will not be given me because client does not want male care, no offense taken, because I was already taken off an assignment before I even started (at another agency) once the family found out I was male.

Again, I'm not arguing against it, not offended by it, just trying to get a feel for how steady a clientele I'll have.

Edited by moretonel

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Home health care can be a very sporadic employment.  Many CNA/HHA state they do not like a two hour visit here, a one hour visit there, that never add up to eight hours of work each day.  Personally, I would find it very difficult to keep my bathing patients within the time limits to meet my daily schedule, if I even had more than one client scheduled.  I do not like to be rushed, especially when I have to consider patient safety, in and out of the shower or bath.  That is why I (although not a CNA/HHA) do full eight hour shifts.  And as for having steady clientele, home care patients are notorious as a group for firing their caregivers on a whim.  If you want to insure steady income, you might want to consider facility employment.  Busy as all get out, but you get eight hours of work each shift.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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58 minutes ago, moretonel said:

Again, I'm not arguing against it, not offended by it, just trying to get a feel for how steady a clientele I'll have.

unfortunately, that will be a case by case thing.  Most, as you have found out already, don't care.  But there will always be 1 or 2 who do, and hopefully they can just find another case for you.

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23 minutes ago, caliotter3 said:

Home health care can be a very sporadic employment.  Many CNA/HHA state they do not like a two hour visit here, a one hour visit there, that never add up to eight hours of work each day.  Personally, I would find it very difficult to keep my bathing patients within the time limits to meet my daily schedule, if I even had more than one client scheduled.  I do not like to be rushed, especially when I have to consider patient safety, in and out of the shower or bath.  That is why I (although not a CNA/HHA) do full eight hour shifts.  And as for having steady clientele, home care patients are notorious as a group for firing their caregivers on a whim.  If you want to insure steady income, you might want to consider facility employment.  Busy as all get out, but you get eight hours of work each shift.

I do currently work full-time at LTC as LPN. I will be adding part-time employment as LPN doing extended-care-home-health/shift-care/private-duty, whatever you want to call it, doing skilled nursing care - vents, trachs, G-tubes, wounds, etc. The same skills I do at LTC (except for vents) but one-on-one on a 4 to 6 hour shift.

Answers will be like:

"I've never known any male nurses to be refused."

"I've seen 3 male nurses refused."

"I've been working home health for 5 years and only seen 1 refuse a male nurse."

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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5 minutes ago, moretonel said:

Answers will be like:

"I've never known any male nurses to be refused."

"I've seen 3 male nurses refused."

"I've been working home health for 5 years and only seen 1 refuse a male nurse."

And all of those answers are correct, depending on who you ask...

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My previous response was to a sentence I picked up on that was taken out of context.  However, LPNs, to a lesser extent, doing extended care home health, have an inherent employment atmosphere where the clients can, and frequently do, fire them on a whim.  And it will have nothing to do with gender, or it will be a completely 360 degree turn-around from day one.  You can be accepted on day one, but after a period of time, the clients change their tune and the agency just goes along.

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quiltynurse56 has 3 years experience as a LPN, LVN and specializes in LTC and Pediatrics.

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I have been working the home care for 1.5 years now.  I only know of 1 family that requests no male nurses.  The agencies I work with will ask the parents if they would take a male nurse.  How many say no to that I can not say as I am in the homes, not in the offices.

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