Explanation of care

Posted
by kidzcare kidzcare Member Nurse

Has 5 years experience.

Just curious how much you explain to your students about your treatment decisions as you make them?

I have really started giving more information as I'm working with the students and while they may not be super excited to hear it, I think some of it sinks in :)

For example:

crackers for nausea because they have a high starch content

ice to reduce swelling

salt gargle to reduce swelling

explain how all their symptoms interact (ie- sinus pain or dizziness r/t congestion)

the action of rescue inhalers (I had a great little lesson with a group of students following running in PE one day since they all came in panting)

How much do you explain? What age do you work with?

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience. 12,646 Posts

I work with high schoolers, so I explain quite a bit. They don't seem bored to my face.

SnowyJ, RN

Has 28 years experience. 1 Article; 844 Posts

I explain RICE to students often when they have a soft tissue injury.

I do a lot of educating about hand washing, covering coughs, etc.

SnowyJ, RN

Has 28 years experience. 1 Article; 844 Posts

And even though it's kind of gross, I shared this with my teachers because it is so important to cover coughs/sneezes the right way!!

The Safe Sneeze by Mythbusters | TED-Ed

kidzcare

kidzcare

Has 5 years experience. 3,393 Posts

I explain RICE to students often when they have a soft tissue injury.

I do a lot of educating about hand washing, covering coughs, etc.

I explain RICE often too and I make sure to add that they cannot elevate their ankle in class, so that will have to wait until they are at home. I can just see a student with his/her leg up on the desk, loudly declaring that the nurse said this is how it has to be.

SnowyJ, RN

Has 28 years experience. 1 Article; 844 Posts

I explain RICE often too and I make sure to add that they cannot elevate their ankle in class, so that will have to wait until they are at home. I can just see a student with his/her leg up on the desk, loudly declaring that the nurse said this is how it has to be.

Yes! Good point. :yes:

JenTheSchoolRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in School nursing. 3,022 Posts

I work with high schoolers, so I explain quite a bit. They don't seem bored to my face.

Ditto. I also work with MS, so I explain things, just a little differently.

Gets them to understand why ice isn't always needed. :)

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 15 years experience. 1 Article; 7,349 Posts

I explain RICE often too and I make sure to add that they cannot elevate their ankle in class, so that will have to wait until they are at home. I can just see a student with his/her leg up on the desk, loudly declaring that the nurse said this is how it has to be.

Are every single one of your classrooms so full that there are no extra chairs anywhere? I don't see the problem with a student elevating his injured leg on a chair that he places next to his desk.

kidzcare

kidzcare

Has 5 years experience. 3,393 Posts

Are every single one of your classrooms so full that there are no extra chairs anywhere? I don't see the problem with a student elevating his injured leg on a chair that he places next to his desk.

I know most of the classes are around 28-30 students. If I felt it couldn't wait, I may allow it, but at the ages I work with (10-12) I could see one kid with their foot up and all of a sudden, 6 more with PE injuries that NEED to be elevated.

There's a LOT of exaggeration with PE injuries. Where my office is located, I can step out into the main office and see the commons area that the kids have to pass through from the gym to my office. I will see kids walking with no issue across there and then as soon as they are in my office they are hopping on one foot, saying they cannot bear weight, moaning, all kinds of drama. 99% of the time when I say "If you cannot bear weight then you need to see a doctor. Let's call home" there is vast and immediate improvement. :)