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Do I really need to get my BS in Nursing??

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by 49*1 49*1 (Member)

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Im currently going for my associates degree in nursing through a community college. I wanted to know since im finishing up my pre-reqs i have some extra time to take a few more classes which would count towards getting my bachelors.

My question is, is it really necessary to get my Bachelors in nursing once i graduate with my associates? My cousin has been a nurse for 10 years with only an associates and is doing fine.

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UVA Grad Nursing works as a Assistant Dean.

26,247 Visitors; 1,068 Posts

The job market for nursing has changed a great deal since the time your cousin entered nursing 10 years ago.

What are your goals in nursing? What sort of environment do you want to practice in? Do you think you might want to pursue further education in nursing? If you think that you might want to pursue graduate study, then a BSN would be very advantageous. If you think you might want to practice at a Magnet hospital or a larger facility, then a BSN may be required.

In my city, there is both an ADN and a BSN program. The major hospital (Magnet hospital) hired 75 new grads this year -- only 5 of these were ADN graduates. These 5 ADNs are encouraged to get their BSN degrees within 5 years (as the level of promotion is tied to holding a BSN degree). There are several 2009 graduates of the ADN program who are still looking for jobs.

If you have the option to pursue your BSN program now, go for it.

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5,502 Visitors; 410 Posts

The move is towards the higher degrees. I think everyone had thought that it wouldn't necessarily happen any time soon, but it's true... especially with the phasing out of the MSN-prepared NP in 2015. I think we'll see a push toward the BSN being the standard of nursing next.

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and works as a Nursing Professional Development + Academic Facult.

5 Followers; 57,822 Visitors; 13,015 Posts

A lot depends on exactly where you live and what your career expectations are. The trend is definitely towards higher levels of education for nurses. And if you will ever want any sort of career advancement, you will need a BSN if not higher. That's just not just "management" positions: it's many clinical positions as well.

An ADN is a fine way to start a nursing career -- but it prepares you for entry-level positions only. A few people with only ADN's manage to find some career advancement opportunities. However, for most opportunities, you'll need the higher level of education.

So ... you should plan on getting the additional education at some point unless you want to be very limited in your job opportunities.

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iodine works as a RN, Cat. case manager.

1,540 Visitors; 21 Posts

As an older RN, BSN is required for hire has been threatened since 1964, when I graduated. I see it has now arrived. The BSN is required for any of the military services and by many larger (magnet) hospitals, as well as many non-clinical positions outside hospitals.

I would urge you to seek your BSN because only the "grandfathered" RN's who are very experienced, are being hired for any position other than small town, rural hospitals.

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2 Followers; 46,351 Visitors; 8,863 Posts

Having your BSN will help you if you want to move past floor nursing. Other than that I don't find a huge benefit especially not the $1 an hour pay raise I got, lol. I only got mine because my career path requires a Masters. Good luck with whatever you decide.

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