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Do you get tired of taking ACLS/PALS/TNCC

Emergency   (2,754 Views 10 Comments)
by Aggie RN Aggie RN, ADN (Member) Member Nurse

Aggie RN has 18 years experience as a ADN and specializes in ER, HH, Case Management.

3,554 Profile Views; 49 Posts

For those of you with lots of experience, do you ever ask why am I here when sitting in those classes after you have taken them so many times?

For me ACLS is a big yes.

PALS not so much. We don't see that many sick kids at my facility, so I always enjoy the brush up.

TNCC, since it's only every four years not yet. But I must say, the first time I took it, it was a bit of a letdown. Having come from EMS to nursing, it wasn't ground shattering material for me. Without the EMS experience, I can see it being great for a new nurse being exposed to trauma.

Your thoughts?

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Medic/Nurse is a BSN, RN and specializes in Flight, ER, Transport, ICU/Critical Care.

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Tired? Not exactly.

I teach most all disciplines, so I just look for ways to make it exciting for me and the students!

Sometimes when you take a class outside of your facility - it can really add to you spark! I took a NRP class at Wary Washington in Fredricksburg VA and (although there wasn't any earth shattering revelations!) I truly enjoyed that class. It was taught by John Eanes MD and was awesome - only 3 in the class, so we got a LOT of personal attention!

But, since I have to have in excess of 125 CEU's yearly for renewal of my various certifications - I just try to find the best classes I can!

Good LUCK!

;)

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canoehead has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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After 23 years of BLS every year, and 15 years of ACLS that covers the same thing, plus a lot more I am sick to death of using up a perfectly good day off to sit through BLS yet again in a small sweaty back room . Even worse if you wind up with a group of brand new CNAs who are amazed at the drama of the video scenarios, and have to share what happened when their great Aunt Beula had her stroke. If I don't know how to blow and pump by now it's hopeless.

Props to the ER doc I took my last BLS class with. We were a slamming team. If that torso had had any kind of a body attached it would have risen and bowed before us. The instructor still made us sit through the full 4 hours, but it was OK because I thought you were pretty hot, for a doc.

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purple1953reading specializes in ER OB NICU.

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I don't mind the recertifications as much as the fact that ER nurses with 12 or more years experience are given three different chances to pass TNCC. It should be so routine, so definitely repeating classes does not necessarily mean they have it down. I took my first ACLS that was to be two day course, as a 1day refresher with everyone from nurses, emt drs. etc. The instructors were animated and put it all in real life situations. You could have flown through that course by just listening. The scenarios were innovative, involved, and stimulating. I remember my peds pt. was od'd on a depressant, and as I came in as the 3rd or 4th person, I really had not treatment left to offer, and said "I would call it." THe guy jumped up and said "He was gone when they brought him in. " BUT we did try everything possible, and I want to know that I did. In addition, when it came to intubation, nobody but me was even familiar with the procedure or had done it. As they came from big hospitals and came from a small rural hospital. I will say that rural medicine teaches you alot about many different fields. They would just call RT or Anesthesia, we did it ourselves. usually you wil take the class with a first timer. I always try to work with one, for their good as well as my own. I have worked with people who passed the course but did not know anything about what to do. It is like being the only nurse on a code. There are lots of people standing around, but nobody knows what to do. I would rather work with them, and KNOW I could depend on them. Like others, I have been the instructor, and I try to involve everybody so the time does not drag by. I always enjoy my neonatal recertification. We get to travel to the city, and the lecturers and instructiors are neonatologists who have the most up to date info, tx. and we usually just stabilize and transfer. I just try to look at each time as a learning experience and look for something new I didn;t know, or took for granted. I DON'T WANT TO BE THE ONE who is stumbling around, looking for something, or having to stop and think what do I do next. I just want to react and save a life.

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MedictoRN has 9 years experience and specializes in Emergency, Family Practice, Occ. Health.

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Just curious, what certifications do you have that need ce's that total to 125 / year? That's nearly 11 / month.

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Kidrn911 has 12 years experience and specializes in Peds ED, Peds Stem Cell Transplant, Peds.

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Yes to all above, especially ACLS

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Yes, I do get tired of the review. It seems like those two years go by awfully fast. Truthfully it is probably a good review, but I resent spending the long hours, usually on a weekend doing it. Does anyone do it on line? How does that work?

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teeituptom is a BSN, RN and specializes in ER, ICU, L&D, OR.

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fall asleep in class

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classicdame is a MSN, EdD and specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

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I had an ER nurse complain about having to take these classes, especially BLS. He said "I have been doing this more than 20 years and I know what to do". Then I asked him about the chest:breath ratios. His reply was 15:2. Wrong. Doing something the same way for years does not mean you are doing it right. The advantage to renewals is getting to learn scientifically researched BEST practice. Another story: one of the nurses complained about PALS being too hard. The very next day her two year old fell into the pool. She called the next week to thank us for "making" her learn what to do in this situation. A hassle, yes, but also a chance for you to shine if you really know it and learn if you don't.

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AmandaBrittainy has 3 years experience and specializes in ER.

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For those of you with lots of experience, do you ever ask why am I here when sitting in those classes after you have taken them so many times?

For me ACLS is a big yes.

PALS not so much. We don't see that many sick kids at my facility, so I always enjoy the brush up.

TNCC, since it's only every four years not yet. But I must say, the first time I took it, it was a bit of a letdown. Having come from EMS to nursing, it wasn't ground shattering material for me. Without the EMS experience, I can see it being great for a new nurse being exposed to trauma.

Your thoughts?

Funny you should say, I am killing time right now before I have to go sit through an ACLS course. Not bad - I just HATE acting out situations - give me a break, am I 5?

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