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MedictoRN

MedictoRN

Emergency, Family Practice, Occ. Health
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MedictoRN has 9 years experience and specializes in Emergency, Family Practice, Occ. Health.

MedictoRN's Latest Activity

  1. MedictoRN

    Letters after name? FNP, APRN, etc

    I get inundated with survey requests all the time. Perhaps somebody should put out a survey of all of us to decide what we think the official title ought to be. Personally I think NP is just fine, though it does exclude our nurse midwife and clinical nurse specialist colleagues. But I think that they are practicing in most places in a different role than that of a nurse practitioner.
  2. MedictoRN

    Letters after name? FNP, APRN, etc

    I see where you could think this from the article but the AANPCP us retiring the Adult NP exam and not the Family NP exam. I found this on their website. http://www.aanpcert.org/ptistore/control/faqs#c5
  3. MedictoRN

    Letters after name? FNP, APRN, etc

  4. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner ENP-BC

  5. MedictoRN

    A dual degree of FNP & ACPNP smart?

    You would have to maintain both national certifications (FNP, ACPNP). As for licensing you would have to keep your RN and NP licenses. I highly doubt that you would have 2 separate NP licenses to maintain. Here in Michigan all APRNs (NP, CNM, CNS,etc) hold the same license. Scope of practice us based on your national certification(s). It should be pretty easy to keep up on CEs as most will count for all three certifications (RN, FNP, PACNP). USA's program is well respected. I would go for it. Good luck!!
  6. MedictoRN

    Work as NP and bedside nurse

    I guess I can't imagine an example where this really applies. So a CBC comes back abnormal, as an RN, regardless of your education, you call the provider in charge of the patient and get an order. I would love to hear an example where this applies. Again, I've never seen any examples of anybody who even knows someone who this impacted. What about cases where an RN with an MSN, but not an NP, was held to a higher standard?
  7. MedictoRN

    Work as NP and bedside nurse

    I don't see where this references NPs in an RN role, just NPs working as NPs in various settings. I would have liked to see more statistical analysis of the data. They really just gave use the descriptive statistics without much analysis.
  8. MedictoRN

    Work as NP and bedside nurse

    I have seen this topic come up many times over the years and have never really understood what the issue is. We are all nurses and are responsible for a standard if care despite your level of education. The standard doesn't change because you have a MSN or DNP. As many times as I have seen this come up I've never seen an example, real or hypothetical, that demonstrated an increased liability risk for an APRN working in an RN role. Seems like an urban legend to me.
  9. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Certification

    There is more to this certification than clinical competence. It validates professional dedication, involvement, leadership, mentorship and clinical expertise. The good news is that nobody has to have this to get a position in the ER. It is simply a way to show to peers, colleages and potential employers that one has demonstrated not just clinical competence but a level of clincal and professional expertise that is above average. This is what I'm using to guide the application process. http://www.nursecredentialing.org/EmergencyNP-PCO This is specific for the ENP application. What you are quoting is the general instructions for all of the certifications through portfolio. I think those specifically listed in the ENP specific instructions are very doable and relevent to my practice.
  10. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Certification

    I see those are the general requirements for the portfolio review process. I'm going to go with the ones specifically for the ENP. To me, those speak less about competency and more about being a leader in the profession. Competency is evaluated in other sections.
  11. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Certification

    I don't know where you found that information but what I listed is copied directly from the ENP Content Outline so that's what I'm using to guide the application process. I stand by my opinion that these are part of what makes this a valuable certification.
  12. The certification by portfolio process is now open. This is very exciting to me. Who else is going to apply? http://www.nursecredentialing.org/EmergencyNP#evidence-required
  13. Now that the application process is open, who's applying? http://www.nursecredentialing.org/EmergencyNP#evidence-required
  14. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Certification

    I don't believe Urgent Care qualifies according to the eligibility criteria published on the ANCC site. It says "Emergency Care".
  15. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Certification

    In my opinion, these things you list as "useless" are some of the key components in what sets this portfolio process apart from taking a test for initial certification. This isn't establishing initial minimal competency, It is validating our expertise, both clinical and professional, in our career specialty. Simply being an NP that works for two, ten or twenty years isn't enough to demonstrate to our peers that we are truly dedicated professionals who are advanced practice nursing experts in Emergency Medicine. If you look at the content outline, Professional Development is only 15% of the review, which is only slightly more than the combined rating of your self eval and peer review, which I'm certain will be stellar for every portfolio submitted. I'm not thinking it should be too hard to come up with a couple of ways to do the things listed below, even in rural communities, if you are serious about wanting this certification. From the content outline: I. Professional Development The ENP is to provide evidence in certifications, professional development record, and/or resume of:  Participating in activities that support personal development and career advancement in emergency care (e.g., speaking engagements, mentoring, precepting, active membership in professional organizations and/or community groups, publishing) The ENP is to provide evidence in certifications, practice hours, professional development record, resume, and/or exemplar of:  Participating in continuing education and academic pursuits (e.g., journal club, obtaining continuing education credits, academic credits, research) related to emergency care (e.g., treatment modalities, disaster training, advanced airway courses, ultrasound training, ACLS)
  16. MedictoRN

    Emergency Nurse Practitioner Certification

    This looks very cool. From looking at the brochure it seems that the requirements just need to be sure that not only are you practicing in an emergency room environment but that you are current on the latest evidence. Certainly you don't think continuing education for any medical professional is "fluff". If you've been doing it for 10 years preceping and professional service shouldn't be too hard to document if you don't have acedemic credits or research. This is from the ANCC website: Emergency Nurse Practitioner Eligibility Criteria Credential Awarded: ENP-BC Eligibility Criteria Hold current licensure (RN or APRN) plus national certification in one of the following nurse practitioner populations: Acute Care Adult Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Family Pediatric Acute Care Pediatric Primary Care Hold a master's, postgraduate, or doctoral degree in one of the following nurse practitioner populations: Acute Care Adult Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Family Pediatric Acute Care Pediatric Primary Care Have practiced the equivalent of 2 years full time as a nurse practitioner in the past 3 years Have a minimum of 2,000 hours of advanced practice in the specialty area of emergency care in the past 3 years Have completed 30 hours of continuing education in advanced emergency care in the past 3 years Fulfill two additional professional development categories, to be selected from the following list: Academic Credits Presentations Publication or Research Preceptor Professional Service