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CRNA will become PhD?

CRNA   (10,833 Views 20 Comments)

hojimma has 13 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN, CRNA and specializes in Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist.

2,677 Profile Views; 27 Posts

Is this true or not?

If yes, WHEN?

provide link if possible

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462 Posts; 5,939 Profile Views

Is this true or not?

If yes, WHEN?

provide link if possible

First of all, CRNA is a certification, not a degree. There is a movement to get all masters' prepared nurses to the doctoral level (DNP) at some point in the future. However, a PhD is a RESEARCH degree, while the DNP is a CLINICAL degree.

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The Doctor of Nursing Practice is a practice-focused doctorate, rather than a traditional research-focused doctorate. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), an accrediting agency for nursing schools (Baccalaureate and Master's degree programs), has proposed that the DNP degree will be the entry level of education for all advanced practice nurses by 2015. Thus, anyone wishing to be a nurse practitioner (NP), clinical nurse specialist (CNS), nurse midwife (CNM) or nurse anesthetist (CRNA) will have to complete a practice doctorate, instead of the master's degree.

OK So does this mean that if I want to be a CRNA (after 2015) I will have to go through nursing school, get experience, apply to CRNA school, and apply to a DNP program? Or will the DNP program be incorporated into the CRNA program? Could someone explain please.

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OK So does this mean that if I want to be a CRNA (after 2015) I will have to go through nursing school, get experience, apply to CRNA school, and apply to a DNP program? Or will the DNP program be incorporated into the CRNA program? Could someone explain please.

You would graduate with your DNSc, DNP, or whatever the title will be. Take the boards, pass, then you'll be a CRNA with your Doctor of "X".

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piper_for_hire specializes in SRNA.

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I believe they way that its going to work is that your DNP will be in anesthesia and there will no longer be a MSN in anesthesia. From what I'm told, the DNP program is about 1.5 years longer than the current 2.5 year NA MSN. I'm not sure if you need an MSN to apply for the DNP program. So, if any of this ever happens, it will take at least 1.5 years longer to become a CRNA and possibly even longer if you need a MSN first.

-S

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wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

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OK So does this mean that if I want to be a CRNA (after 2015) I will have to go through nursing school, get experience, apply to CRNA school, and apply to a DNP program? Or will the DNP program be incorporated into the CRNA program? Could someone explain please.

No...What it means is that it is recommened at this point, and until your state or all states boards of nursing decide to implement this recommendation all APNs still only need their master's degree. Your state board of nursing makes these changes usually based on recommendations/studies. Right now there is a big push for all APNs to get their practice doctorate to be consistent with other health practitioners....Pharmacy, PT, OT and several others have all moved to clinical practice doctorates already.

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DarrenWright specializes in Cardiac Surg, IR, Peds ICU, Emergency.

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First of all, CRNA is a certification, not a degree. There is a movement to get all masters' prepared nurses to the doctoral level (DNP) at some point in the future. However, a PhD is a RESEARCH degree, while the DNP is a CLINICAL degree.

Just to add a bit of info; depending on where the DNP program is offered, one could make it an administrative or non-research academic degree as well.

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samswim4 has 5 years experience and specializes in Operating Room.

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I'm pretty sure the DNP will be incorporated into the Master's Program. Since the CRNA master's program is just short of a doctorate degree, I think they are going to add a few more courses to make it a doctorate program instead of a master's program. I think it's pretty similar to the Physical Therapy programs where they were all master's programs and switched to doctorate programs.

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jwk has 32 years experience.

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No...What it means is that it is recommened at this point, and until your state or all states boards of nursing decide to implement this recommendation all APNs still only need their master's degree. Your state board of nursing makes these changes usually based on recommendations/studies. Right now there is a big push for all APNs to get their practice doctorate to be consistent with other health practitioners....Pharmacy, PT, OT and several others have all moved to clinical practice doctorates already.

Just remember these changes (if they occur) will take decades. There are thousands of practicing CRNA's with no degree, some with a bachelor's degree, and all of them finishing since the early/mid 90's have a master's. The same is true of pharmacists, PT's, etc. The majority of them still have "the old degree". PharmD has been around for a few years, and the DPT is very new.

Also remember that the DNP degree itself means nothing as far as legal scope of practice. That is determined by state boards of nursing and/or state legislatures.

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I want to know what kind of courses/training is going to take place in the extra 1.5 years to get this DNP. Personally, most of the courses that I take now that are requirements for the masters degree, such as research, program planning, etc. I find to be a complete waste of time. I don't see how moving to a doctorate makes much sense, when it would take every bit as long as med school (longer actually when you include the required years of ICU experience), why not just go to med school then? Especially if the extra 1.5 years turns out to be more fluff classes.

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The AANA does not support the DNP becoming the entry level to nurse anesthesia practice and CRNAs are not credentialed by the American Nurses Credentialing Center etiher.

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