CRNA question for VCU

Posted
by Rn2023 Rn2023 (New) New Nurse

Has 12 years experience.

I intend to apply to the CRNA program for the 2023 academic year. My key concerns are 1. my GPA is on the lower end of the acceptable range, and 2. my current ICU experience will be a couple years removed from application date.Please see my current qualifications below.

Here is a list of my current statistics: 

I graduated with 3.24 GPA. 

I have been working as a register nurse since 2010. 

I have a total of 4 years of critical care RN experience in two different hospital 2 yrs in each hospital. In addition another 4yrs of ED/ICU experience.

I am a current CCRN since 2015. 

I plan on taking the GRE in January 2022. 

Currently, I am working in a step down unit as a charge nurse managing pulmonary patients (for example, pre lung transplant, Endobronchial Valve, Interstitial lung disease patients).

My questions are as follows: 

Considering my GPA is on the lower acceptable range, is the GRE score extremely important for a candidate with my qualifications? 

Is my listed ICU experience enough to be competitive or do I need to be actively in an ICU position prior to applying for the CRNA program?

Any advice would be helpful

thank you

PaSSiNGaS

PaSSiNGaS, MSN

Specializes in Nurse Anesthesiology. Has 17 years experience. 261 Posts

1. I would go back to ICU and keep gaining experience there

2. Score high on the GRE

3. To boost your chances and show them your GPA isn't a reflection of how you will do in graduate studies consider taking a graduate class in physiology or pharmacology or take an undergrad Biochem class.

And I'm curious how can you still hold a CCRN without ICU experience currently?

amgarcia8891, BSN, RN

Specializes in SRNA. Has 6 years experience. 48 Posts

I think you should go back to the ICU and do well on the GRE, and you should have much better chances.

BigPappaCRNA

BigPappaCRNA

270 Posts

As it sits right now, you have zero chance of getting in to VCU.  Period.  Sorry to be so blunt, but they are one of, if not THE premiere CRNA school right now.  Some programs will let you get away with having one hole in your resume', but VCU is not on of them, it is just too competitive.

You must get some good quality, current ICU experience, and you must hit a home run with your GRE score.

Good Luck.

PaSSiNGaS

PaSSiNGaS, MSN

Specializes in Nurse Anesthesiology. Has 17 years experience. 261 Posts

Just now, BigPappaCRNA said:

As it sits right now, you have zero chance of getting in to VCU.  Period.  Sorry to be so blunt, but they are one of, if not THE premiere CRNA school right now.  Some programs will let you get away with having one hole in your resume', but VCU is not on of them, it is just too competitive.

You must get some good quality, current ICU experience, and you must hit a home run with your GRE score.

Good Luck.

"THE" premiere school? I don't know where you got that info from and if it's from that US News thing that isn't accurate one bit.  I can tell you the CRNAs at VCU are used to benefit the residents 100%.  That whole program sets up to cater to the residents at that hospital.

And saying VCU doesn't allow people in with "holes" in their resume is another false statement.  I know of CRNAs who got accepted to VCU with misdemeanors on their records and poor GPAs.

BigPappaCRNA

BigPappaCRNA

270 Posts

Hmmmm....well lets see.  I said some programs may all one to have one hole, and still be considered.  Your CV is one entire black hole.  There is not one single qualification that you present currently, that would even get you an interview, much less accepted. That is just a cold, hard fact.

Speaking of which, if VCU is such a bad program, and only used to support and enrich the residents, than why are you considering it?  I happen to know VCU is one of the top programs, because I interact with their faculty and graduates on a regular basis.  I also know how well the program and its Program Director are regarded within the profession.

Honestly, you need to listen more, and talk less.  I have been in the profession for almost 30 years, and been in education for over 20 years.  One of us knows what they are talking about, and one of us does not.

PaSSiNGaS

PaSSiNGaS, MSN

Specializes in Nurse Anesthesiology. Has 17 years experience. 261 Posts

6 minutes ago, BigPappaCRNA said:

Hmmmm....well lets see.  I said some programs may all one to have one hole, and still be considered.  Your CV is one entire black hole.  There is not one single qualification that you present currently, that would even get you an interview, much less accepted. That is just a cold, hard fact.

Speaking of which, if VCU is such a bad program, and only used to support and enrich the residents, than why are you considering it?  I happen to know VCU is one of the top programs, because I interact with their faculty and graduates on a regular basis.  I also know how well the program and its Program Director are regarded within the profession.

Honestly, you need to listen more, and talk less.  I have been in the profession for almost 30 years, and been in education for over 20 years.  One of us knows what they are talking about, and one of us does not.

You must really be confused. I’ve been a CRNA for well over 10 years. I also know many graduates and some CRNAs who work there so my info is straight from the source.  CRNAs there almost exclusively do all the offsite anesthetics. Why? Because these sites are a pain and they don’t want to have the residents do them so they can focus on bigger cases. That’s just one example of many but to each their own. 

BigPappaCRNA

BigPappaCRNA

270 Posts

3 minutes ago, PaSSiNGaS said:

You must really be confused. I’ve been a CRNA for well over 10 years. I also know many graduates and some CRNAs who work there so my info is straight from the source.  CRNAs there almost exclusively do all the offsite anesthetics. Why? Because these sites are a pain and they don’t want to have the residents do them so they can focus on bigger cases. That’s just one example  f many but to each their own. 

My apologies.  I did not see that you was a different person responding than the OP.  My bad.  As far as VCU, they are one of the leaders in the profession. You have a different opinion based on your interaction with their faculty and graduates than I do.  Either way, the CV presented in the OP will not get an interview, sorry to say.

gorogue

gorogue

3 Posts

On 4/14/2021 at 6:00 PM, PaSSiNGaS said:

You must really be confused. I’ve been a CRNA for well over 10 years. I also know many graduates and some CRNAs who work there so my info is straight from the source.  CRNAs there almost exclusively do all the offsite anesthetics. Why? Because these sites are a pain and they don’t want to have the residents do them so they can focus on bigger cases. That’s just one example of many but to each their own. 

Hey! I was excepted into both DNP-A and DNAP programs both are well known. I am curious if one is better than the other? As a student do you prefer front-loaded or integrated? 

The DNP-A is an integrated program. Over 20 clinical sites. In your first clinical rotation, they keep you at the same facility for 4 months. After that and for the remainder of the program you rotate clinical sites every 1-2 months. Tuition is around $113,000. Clinical is in SE Michigan area. Low attrition rate. 100% first-time pass rate. 90-94% first-time pass rate. Near family and away from husband. 

The DNAP is a front-loaded program. Over 20 clinical sites. In your first clinical rotation you get a "primary site" and the rest of the time you "rotate out" of the primary site to go to specialty sites. Tuition is around f$147,000. Clinical is in DC/MD/VA. Low attrition rate. 100% employment. 100% first-time pass rate. Near husband. 

Do you have any advice or suggestions? 

beachbabe86

beachbabe86

Specializes in Oceanfront Living. Has 22 years experience. 122 Posts

accepted instead of excepted... best of luck

 

amgarcia8891, BSN, RN

Specializes in SRNA. Has 6 years experience. 48 Posts

On 5/5/2021 at 9:33 PM, mooregc said:

Hey! I was excepted into both DNP-A and DNAP programs both are well known. I am curious if one is better than the other? As a student do you prefer front-loaded or integrated? 

The DNP-A is an integrated program. Over 20 clinical sites. In your first clinical rotation, they keep you at the same facility for 4 months. After that and for the remainder of the program you rotate clinical sites every 1-2 months. Tuition is around $113,000. Clinical is in SE Michigan area. Low attrition rate. 100% first-time pass rate. 90-94% first-time pass rate. Near family and away from husband. 

The DNAP is a front-loaded program. Over 20 clinical sites. In your first clinical rotation you get a "primary site" and the rest of the time you "rotate out" of the primary site to go to specialty sites. Tuition is around f$147,000. Clinical is in DC/MD/VA. Low attrition rate. 100% employment. 100% first-time pass rate. Near husband. 

Do you have any advice or suggestions? 

Hi, I am only in my first semester at VCU, but from what you are describing, I would pick based on where you would potentially want to work after school. Also, I couldn't be away from my husband for that long. IDK if VCU is the second school, but if you have more questions I'd be happy to answer them