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CRNA, Anesthesiologist Relationships

CRNA   (847 Views 14 Comments)
by cristianomiguel cristianomiguel (New Member) New Member Nurse

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To any SRNAs and CRNAs,

I am an RN starting CRNA school later this year. Anesthesia intrigues me, and I have highly enjoyed every shadowing experience I've had with CRNAs. I have spent years of my life committed to joining this field. While preparing for school, I've perused the internet regarding the state of the field of anesthesia, and it is worrying. I've seen so much animosity between physicians and nurse anesthetists.

I hate drama. I don't like politics distracting from the quality of patient care. I know people can be entirely different behind the computer screen (e.g. keyboard warriors), but I am still worried. Are these online wars of malicious opinions a true reflection of the field? Is there animosity in the clinical setting? Maybe it is all over-exaggerated, but I've seen so many negative opinions of the field of anesthesia and the direction it's heading from both sides (nurses and physicians). I just don't want to join a field that is in the middle of a huge war. 

I respect physicians and the years of their lives they've spent dedicated to the practice of medicine. I equally respect nurses and APRNs who've done the same. Any reflections and experiences would be appreciated. 

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Bluebolt has 6 years experience.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 25,203 Visitors; 543 Posts

You should specify when you say anesthesiologist if you are referring to dental anesthesiologists, nurse anesthesiologists, or physician anesthesiologists.

CRNAs have great working relationships with all their fellow colleagues in anesthesia. 

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125 Visitors; 6 Posts

Bluebolt,

Good point: my post was referring to relationships between physician anesthesiologists and CRNAs. 

Thank you for providing your input. 

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4,717 Visitors; 148 Posts

Anesthesia is no different than any other part of life, it is all a Bell Curve.  Most people happily exist and thrive in 90% or so that is under the curve.  There are a few assholes however, in every profession, who only want to exist and only thrive out in the tail of the curve.  Nothing you can do about it, it just is what it is.  Occasionally tail lover on the left of the curve will cross paths with tail lover from the right side of the curve.  Fireworks ensue.  Stand back and watch the show.

 

It is a great field, and it is expanding.  The US is getting bigger and bigger and older and older and there will be plenty of work to go around.

 

 

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On 5/1/2019 at 2:31 PM, Bluebolt said:

You should specify when you say anesthesiologist if you are referring to dental anesthesiologists, nurse anesthesiologists, or physician anesthesiologists.

CRNAs have great working relationships with all their fellow colleagues in anesthesia. 

This ^^^ is why you will be entering a mine field if you choose anesthesia.

Been doing this for 25 years in every practice setting that exists. What the naive  individuals that think this way don't understand is that anesthesiologists aren't the only doctors that CRNA's work with.

While they advocate for appropriating the term 'anesthesiologist' for CRNA's by demurring about an obscure, insignificant group of dentists, they forget about their credibility with their bread and butter, the surgeons.

And they just validate what a few anesthesiologists have been saying all along which is that nurse anesthetists aren't good enough. Plays right into their hands.

 

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DO_question has 7 years experience.

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There is no such thing as a "nurse anesthesiologist." Anesthetist is used generically everywhere else, but in the US the term "anesthesiologist," was created specifically to distinguish medical practitioners from nursing practitioners.

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Bluebolt has 6 years experience.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 25,203 Visitors; 543 Posts

13 hours ago, DO_question said:

There is no such thing as a "nurse anesthesiologist." Anesthetist is used generically everywhere else, but in the US the term "anesthesiologist," was created specifically to distinguish medical practitioners from nursing practitioners.

In August there is a vote being brought forth by CRNAs to officially change the national association's name to the American Association of Nurse Anesthesiologists. 

Apparently, through an AANA task force, it was discovered that "Anesthetist" nor "Anesthesiologist" is a legal title and cannot be copyrighted. Legal counsel advised that both were merely descriptors. I suppose that is why the ASA officially changed their stance to referring to themselves as physician anesthesiologists instead of just anesthesiologists. It's also probably why dentists who have done some training in anesthesia refer to themselves as dental anesthesiologists. 

I understand people have a great deal of emotional and nostalgic reactions to certain words or phrases. I'm interested in seeing how the world of anesthesia progresses over the next few decades. 

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14 hours ago, DO_question said:

There is no such thing as a "nurse anesthesiologist." Anesthetist is used generically everywhere else, but in the US the term "anesthesiologist," was created specifically to distinguish medical practitioners from nursing practitioners.

Not trying to be rude, but you simply could not be more incorrect.  The ASA's own study and data prove this out.  They changed their title to "physician anesthesiologist" specifically to distinguish themselves because research showed them the term "anesthesiologist" was not adequate.  Interestingly, the state of New Hampshire and their BON has officially adopted the title of 'Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesiologist" and it is now codified.  Additionally there was a recent landmark case in Texas where "Dental Anesthesiologist" has been deemed legal and proper to use for those who have earned the title.

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DO_question has 7 years experience.

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To both the above,

Exactly.  The term "anesthesiologist," was termed due to the confusion (everyone went by anesthetist prior) and now you can see CRNAs pushing to use Anesthesiologist.  I'll take your word on the copy right issue.

Please walk in anywhere and state "I'm an anesthesiologist," and ask the surgeon, tech, other physicians, nurses etc whether they think you're a physician or a nurse...

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Bluebolt has 6 years experience.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 25,203 Visitors; 543 Posts

17 hours ago, DO_question said:

Please walk in anywhere and state "I'm an anesthesiologist," and ask the surgeon, tech, other physicians, nurses etc whether they think you're a physician or a nurse...

1

Give it 10 years. ;)

Shoulda matched into surgery! 

Edited by Bluebolt

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I am not of anesthesiologist specialty but have to agree with what offlabel says. A lot of my surgeon friends work well with both crna and physicians but think it’s ridiculous that nurses are trying to blur the lines between anesthesiologist physicians and nurse anesthetists. If there was any question of competences then one should be OK with being called an anesthetist.... not further earning a doctorate in nursing and then attempting to change title to anesthesiologist. 

 

Its nothing more more than an attempt to blur the lines between physician and nurse in order to confuse patients. 

if CRNA are comfortable in their role then why hide what you are? It makes my surgeon friends chuckle and glad I work outpatient and not with CRNAs attempting to be real doctors and making the CRNAs who enjoy their profession as is.  

Edited by hogger

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305 Visitors; 18 Posts

6 hours ago, Bluebolt said:

Give it 10 years. ;)

Shoulda matched into surgery! 

I bet the surgeons you work with never make fun of you in the lounge. I’m sure your supervising anesthesiologist also loves you with that nurse is god attitude. Or are you still a student at MTSA

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