CNA pre-req class- really unsure about it - page 2

Has anyone ever been super unsure about taking the CNA course? I know I definitely do not want to work as a CNA, and am only taking the course because I have to as a pre-req for the LPN program. I... Read More

  1. by   sonomala
    I actually talked to an expierenced lpn this morning about stuff like this. She did the job for over 25 years and worked in a hospital and an ltc.

    She agreed CNA is by far tougher then LPN. CNA's are at the bottom of the healthcare food chain. It upset her greatly to see them working so hard and getting so little respect from families, the nurses, and residents/patients.

    She also advised me that you didn't have to be a great cna to be a great nurse. In fact cna burns out some great potential nurses. Its my understanding that once you get the cna certification for lpn you don't have to actually work the job. The clinicals will give you the basics and the exposure to the working enviorment.

    I lost my cna job about a month ago. I'm still looking for something but I'm looking in cna and retail. (part-time for school) If I don't get cna I won't be heartbroken. CNA was the nastiest grossest hardest job I have ever done in my life! And I worked for a large animal vet! It sent me into a tailspin because I thought i can't do this no way. Every admin and nurse I have met said since I can and I will thrive. To be a cna it takes a strong body, a super strong heart with steel armor on the outside, and a quick mind. To be an lpn more important is a super intelligent brain because you're responsible for so much more then basic care. An intelligent person like yourself understands their own weaknesses. You're right on track to being a great nurse.
    And I wouldn't listen to the whole thing about going to a clinic. Its your choice, lpns around here, can pick and choose their jobs. Thats the advantage of higher education.
  2. by   Busia
    Quote from fuzzywuzzy
    You can't get too defensive when in your first post, all you mentioned was that you don't want to have a gross job like the rest of us.
    I'm sorry, I have read and re-read my first post, and can't for the life of me find where I said that. I apologize if I have offended you or anyone else by posting in this forum. I assumed that there would be people in here that are either taking the CNA class now or soon as just a pre-req, since it seems that just about every state has that as a requirement for any LPN program. I figured this would be a good place to post since every single person here either has or will be taking this class. Since this forum is under the "student" heading and not the "specialty" heading, I didn't realize this forum was only for people employed as CNA's. I will make sure to use the correct forums in the future.
    Last edit by Busia on May 11, '09
  3. by   Taffey
    CNA students and working CNA'S post here. You have valid concerns. In my own personal experience the CNA class is required for my program. I never worked in the medical field. I thought how am going to this. But taking the class was good to see some of the things that you may have to do as a nurse. Yes, some of it was not pleasant but after time you just did it. My clincals were for about five months so I had lots of practice doing stuff that I may not have been so keen about in the begining. If you read other threads in different subjects you will see that there are things that working Nurses and CNA's do not like to do, but they do because it is part of the job. Since your program is short is should not be so bad. You may surprise yourself. Good luck .
  4. by   texastaz
    Quote from Misslady113
    Don't just go into nursing thinking that things will just be one way, cause reality isn't that way. Know what your getting yourself into and don't go in there with a jaded idea of how you think things will be, or you may end up being one of those nurses who realized they can't handle the job.

    Being a CNA is hard, dirty work. But starting off at the bottom rung of the ladder is sometimes the best way to move sucessfully to the top.
    I think the above quote is a young spirited and honest reply. I am a older CNA - short history I worked as a EMT years ago then, got a business degree - kids grew up and I decided to realy go back to where my heart was with medical - but I did not want to work in ER I wanted to have more patient - long term contact. So I decided to become a CNA before devoting the energy, time - sacrifice - tuition cost for Nursing although I had been acceppted to the program - I wanted to be sure.

    I think it boils down to - either you are one or not. There are many different areas of Nursing - but you can't be a good nurse if you have it in you that you will just loose the compassion, love and desire for the job. It means while CNA's know it is the bottom of the ladder job in medical - and experienced CNA will tell you Nurses are required to do and be able to do the same things we do/and many do in ICU and so forth-plus triple wammy of stress and accountability.

    If you are sincere about Medical - you can never loose with less education and while CNA is at the bottom, the experience and skills of being a CNA can help you be on the top no matter what your decision is.

    I wish you the best.
  5. by   ohiogyrl
    Hey Busia, I'm a very new cna. My first day actually was today. But just to let you know the LPNs where I did clinicals and at my job get down and dirty. We had LPN students at my job today and I was changing someone's undergarments and was asked to step back b/c the LPN students were doing that. So you just never know. Where I did clinicals the LPNs sometimes had to do messier things like treating bed sores on the butt that were EXTREME and changing colostomy bags (sp?). Also someone made a good point above and said you can't be 100% sure where you're going to end up working as an LPN. Jobs are hard to come by so you can't bank on the exact area you want to work in. You might not get to work in a doctors office. Good luck with your journey and don't take the responses personal...they're just very honest and not meant to offend youheartbeat
  6. by   V9611
    I think either way,,,LPN OR CNA....you are going to have to deal with some or the messy aspects of the job, whatever route you take..you are gonna run into it....I think that you will get alot from taking a CNA class and you may find out thay you are capable of alot more than you think. And CNA's work in alot of different settings as well, so you are not nesessarily going to be working with elderly people. But believe me, you will get a ton of experience doing the job, that will only help you in the long run..especially going through nursing school....besides...LPN's do alot, like packing open wounds, and removing fecal impactions, etc...so the experience will only help you....Good luck.
  7. by   Busia
    Quote from vanessa9611
    And CNA's work in alot of different settings as well, so you are not nesessarily going to be working with elderly people.
    .
    I wasn't aware that CNA's did work other than with the elderly. What kind? I guess I've always associated the job with nursing homes.
  8. by   V9611
    are you being sarcastic??? CNA's work in alot of different settings, and some of the nurses taking care of your baby sister in the NICU were probably CNA's, I know that when i was in the hospital in preterm labor...i was there for 3 weeks and almost everyone taking care of me were CNA's the nurse only came in like twice a day or at shift change...after i had the baby's, CNA's were the ones bringing the babies in and showing me how to feed, etc....so they are everywhere!!!
  9. by   Busia
    No, I'm definitely not being sarcastic. I have only ever had contact with a CNA (that I knew was a CNA anyway) in a nursing home setting. And of the five hospitals all within an hour or less away from here, I've only seen positions for CNA's listed for the LTC facilities that are attached to two of the hospitals. I've never seen job listings for anything else. What types of things do they do in other settings?
  10. by   dcRn2b
    Busia..
    I was were you are at right now a year ago yet it seems like yesterday. For the Rn program I was applying to they would not even accept your application without proof of your CNA. I was so scared I felt the same thing you are going through. By the time clinicals were over I knew so many wonderful people some old some young. One man I will never forget. He had a stroke at the age of 28 He brightened my day with every word he spoke. He was 35 when I did my clinicals. I used him as my pt for bath skills. I never thought I could pull off my CNA but I did and I'm so thankful I did. I have a whole new outlook of the lives of CNA's.

    To answer your question you can work in many Dr. offices, Rehab centers, home health, Hospitals on many floors not just geriatrics. Good luck to you and all your goals if you believe you SUCCEED!!!!!
  11. by   V9611
    CNAs in maternal newborn care for the mother, too. They may perform tasks like assisting a mother up to the bathroom, shower, or for a sitz bath. They might bring needed personal items like water pitchers, juice, remove food trays after meals, change bed linens. They can transport baby to and from the nursery, might be trained to perform tasks like the hearing screens or the heel stick for the metabolic screens, and yes, sometimes they get to hold and feed the baby. But that's only a very small part of a CNA's job in this setting.

    Pediatrics would be a similar experience. It's not going to just be children, a family member will almost always be spending the entire stay with the child in the room. They will often handle the basic needs for the child like toileting and feeding.

    CNA's take vitals, can double check blood products with an RN, empty foleys, hats, and commodes, assist patients with ambulating to the commode or bathroom, if necessary, pass and collect trays and record food intake and liquid intake, help with cleaning patients, make beds on day shift, answer call lights, stock isolation carts, pass out water and linen, and help patients with hygiene.
  12. by   mncna08
    yes,you can pretty much work anywhere. some hospitals will even pay for all of your schooling as well. i think most places want you to be cpr certafied, you do lots of stuff at hospitals im sure, vitals, cath care, bed baths lots im sure. you should just google and look up some of the aspects of all the jobs you can get.
  13. by   Busia
    Quote from vanessa9611
    CNAs in maternal newborn care for the mother, too. They may perform tasks like assisting a mother up to the bathroom, shower, or for a sitz bath. They might bring needed personal items like water pitchers, juice, remove food trays after meals, change bed linens. They can transport baby to and from the nursery, might be trained to perform tasks like the hearing screens or the heel stick for the metabolic screens, and yes, sometimes they get to hold and feed the baby. But that's only a very small part of a CNA's job in this setting.

    .
    I've had three kids, and I was always so grateful to the person doing these things for me and the baby after delivery. I never knew those were CNA's. I guess I never really looked at people's tags to see what their titles were, and just assumed they were all nurses. I've thought that would be a nice job, to help with these things after delivery, but had no idea that those were CNA's! Thanks for enlightening me!

close