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CNA Clinicals

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Hello everyone. I am currently enrolled at my local community college for the CNA program (summer semester). In about a week or two, we begin clinicals. I guess I'm nervous because I do not know what to expect. If possible, could anyone provide me with what ya'll did for clinicals? Any advice? Thank you.

Well I did my first two clinical rotations at SNF's and as a LVN student we had to do all the CNA work. It was interesting and hard. CNAs do a lot of work!! Learn your vital signs cause that's what you will be doing... Proper body mechanics when lifts or adjusting pt. Bathing and ADL's. Just look available to help anyone! Never give attitude and always say yes. Helpful helpful helpful lol

Well, in Arkansas, we basically just performed the skills we learned while in class. We passed ice, checked a few people's vital signs, made beds (occupied and vacant), gave a shower/bath and dressed a resident, performed denture care, and transferred residents from beds to walkers/wheel-chairs/etc. We also emptied drainage bags (catheter bags) and colostomy bags (eh). It's really not going to be hard. However, we did clinicals at an LTC facility and not a hospital. I'm sure, if you do them at a hospital, it's going to be a little bit more demanding, but that's the part I love about being a nurse assistant. I want to work at a hospital and plan on doing so once I get my license transferred to Texas. You're going to be fine!

Missingyou, CNA

Specializes in Long term care. Has 20 years experience.

We did the skills that we learned in class. We were paired up with another student and if we were unsure or had questions we asked our instructor for help.

We started with one resident (me & my partner had one resident to care for the entire shift). The next day we had 3 residents.

We were not allowed to transfer any resident without the instructor present.

Where I work only the nurses do vitals, not the CNA. We have students coming to our facility soon and we (CNAs) make the students do everything from the get go. With us helping of course!

We did the skills that we learned in class. We were paired up with another student and if we were unsure or had questions we asked our instructor for help.

We started with one resident (me & my partner had one resident to care for the entire shift). The next day we had 3 residents.

We were not allowed to transfer any resident without the instructor present.

I had a similar experience. We were also paired with a veteran CNA (two for our hall - so we would split up occasionally) and I just asked a lot of questions.

Try to do as much as you can (whilst remaining compliant with the LTC rules) and you'll be amazed at how quickly you'll learn.

Good luck!

I'm just finishing up my clinicals now! It's been a blast :) I was at a SNF and it was assisted living for most of them. We didn't really have any dementia residents. We each had a primary resident assigned to us but we also helped the rest of the residents. I had a gentleman with an aka and ileostomy which was great because I got a lot of experience with the lift and ostomy care. The rest of the time, when our specific residents didn't need us, we were out by the nurses desk waiting for call lights and seeing what they needed us to do to lighten their loads. I have just a couple pieces of advice that really helped me get the most out of the experience. If you are allowed to, answer as many call lights as you can. Don't wait for other students to do it. Show initiative. We have a couple students in our class that lack any confidence that they won't go into a residents room without one of the more confident students (I am one of them even though I have no prior medical training... I just figure, if it's something I have been trained to do, I can do it. If not, I have no issues telling them that and going to get an actual licensed LNA). The other piece of advice is don't be shy. If you hear that a nurse or LNA is performing a procedure or something you haven't seen, ask if you can observe. The worst thing they can say is no (which I have never had happen to me). If a nurse or LNA offers to show you something, accept with enthusiasm! It's the best way to learn! Sometimes residents don't want students doing their care. That's ok and their prerogative. There were a couple of people that every time I answered their call light and asked if I could help them with something they said " No, YOU can't" I would just smile and say, "Okay, let me go get an LNA for you" and that would be that. Most of the residents were excited that we were learning and loved being able to help teach us something. There are some embarassing moments though! I was helping a woman take her stockings off for the night and I have a bad knee. When I went to get up from crouching my leg gave out and I flew sideways. Thankfully I managed to catch myself. The two roommates were so worried that I had hurt myself, but we all had a good laugh afterwards (I told them maybe I should be the one with the call bell since it seems I'm a fall risk). This resident is now one of my favorites and I love going to visit her (I seem to always be the one who she asks to remove her stockings, although now we giggle and make sure I stand up a different way). It's a lot of fun but can be very stressful. I find when I help a certain woman who is total assist get to bed, I am drenched in sweat. She is not large by any means, but it's a lot of effort getting her situated, doing peri care, getting her brief on for the night, positioning her, providing oral care, etc. And of course you are wearing gloves so you can't wipe your forehead. It's worth it though, some of the residents are such a hoot (one always offers us to sit on her lap and give us backrubs). Ah, didn't mean this to be so long. Go into it with an open attitude and I'm sure you'll have fun!

Best advice I can give is to be proactive, show initiative, do what the instructor tells you, and don't use short cuts even if your shadow does. Safety first; use proper body mechanics. If you don't feel comfortable doing something because it doesn't seem right, don't do it.

I want to thank you all for being so supportive and informative. That really helps. :)