A Day in the Life of a Work-At-Home Nurse

  1. Is is possible to be a nurse who works from home? Yes! This piece captures the routine of one nurse who works from a home-based office.

    A Day in the Life of a Work-At-Home Nurse

    For starters, I currently work as a case management nurse for a major insurance company that most of the dear readers have probably heard of. In fact, my employer might even be the same company that insures you and/or your loved ones. The realm of case management is very new to me; in addition, this is my very first nursing position away from the bedside. Prior to securing this position, I had been a bedside nurse for approximately 10 years in specialties such as long term care and acute rehabilitation. So far I have been working in this non-bedside role for a handful of months. The learning curve has been considerably steep, but I am learning along the way.

    I work from a home office and must visit healthcare facilities to interview patients who are insured by the company that I work for. The purpose of these interviews is to ascertain whether these patients have any unmet needs that could possibly be funded by the insurance company, such as potential home modifications, dental care, vaccinations, or behavioral health treatments. If any unmet needs are identified, I must either assist in coordinating the services or make referrals to the appropriate insurance department to ensure the patient receives what they need. Furthermore, I must be on the lookout for costly trends such as revolving-door hospitalizations, frequent ER visits, unstable body weights, lack of a primary care provider, and a history of noncompliance with medications and treatments.

    In a nutshell, my role involves the coordination of services that will help insured persons to maintain or enhance their health. Here is a snapshot of a typical work day for me.

    8:00 to 9:00 am:

    During the first hour of the day I log onto the company computer, check emails, and see whether any new candidates have been referred to me. If any new candidates have been referred, I look the patient up to find out his/her location and the type of evaluation that needs to be completed (if any).

    9:00 to 10:00 am:

    Most of the facilities to which I've been assigned are located anywhere from 45 minutes to one hour from my home one way. Hence, I typically spend the second hour of my day driving to a particular facility. As a personal rule of thumb, I generally do not visit multiple health care facilities on the same day.

    10:00 to 11:00 am:

    The late morning is normally spent reviewing the medical records of the patients that I plan to assess that day. I'm examining their diagnoses, medical history, medications, weight trends, physician consultations, social worker notes, and anything that will help paint a clearer picture of the situation at hand.

    11:00 am to 1:00 pm:

    The middle of my work day is spent conducting interviews with inpatients to gather data for my assessments. As previously stated, the purpose of these encounters is to figure out whether any unmet needs exist and pinpoint any costly trends that could be corrected. I typically interview three to four patients per day. Each interview takes anywhere from 30 to 40 minutes to complete.

    1:00 to 2:00 pm:

    This is my lunch hour. I normally spend it in the car driving from the facility back to the city where I live.

    2:00 to 5:00 pm:

    The last part of the work day is spent typing and uploading assessments, evaluations, care plans, revisions to the plan of care, and more paperwork into the company computer. Sometimes I do this from the home office. On many occasions I do this from a place with a fast WiFi connection such as the public library, Starbucks, or Panera Bread Cafe, especially if the weather is pleasant.

    Overall, this position has been remarkably flexible. I can start my work day earlier or later if needed. Also, I can do more patient interviews and evaluations on a certain work day to catch up if I have fallen behind. My case load consists of about 150 patients and I am expected to see about 15 patients each week.
    Last edit by Joe V on Jun 14, '18
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    About TheCommuter, BSN, RN

    TheCommuter, BSN, RN, CRRN, has helped moderate several Allnurses.com forums since 2007. She is a currently a student in a distance MSN degree program and draws upon her experiences to write.

    Joined: Feb '05; Posts: 38,032; Likes: 69,287
    CRRN, now a case management RN; from US
    Specialty: Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych

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    25 Comments

  3. by   oceanblue52
    Thanks for posting! Sounds like an a great job opportunity that is suiting you well. Appreciate learning more about case management nursing.
  4. by   lafox
    Thank you for posting. I would love to look into this type of work. Can you tell me if companies like this ever hire part time?
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from lafox
    Can you tell me if companies like this ever hire part time?
    I'm sure you would be able to find a part-time position at an insurance company if you looked hard enough. I do know that positions for PRN case managers open up regularly if you happen to want the flexibility.
  6. by   jeniffied
    Thank you for posting
  7. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from oceanblue52
    Appreciate learning more about case management nursing.
    To be honest, I'm still learning about case management learning as I go. This specialty is very new to me and I still have quite the learning curve to overcome.
  8. by   LadyRN2399
    Could you possibly share the name of the Insurance Company that you work for ? I would be very interested in this type of work. The majority of Case Managment rolls I have looked into are office based
    Thank you !
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from LadyRN2399
    Could you possibly share the name of the Insurance Company that you work for ?
    I'm somewhat uncomfortable sharing the name of my employer on a public forum. However, you have certainly heard of the company. It's on a similar scale as other major insurance companies such as Aetna, United Healthcare, Humana, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and Anthem.
  10. by   remshowccm
    Hi
    I have been a telephonic Nurse manager for about 8 years. I read your article and I am very much interested in the flexibility and seems to fit into what I love to do. Can you link me up?
    Me e-mail address is remshow_53@msn.com. Thanks
  11. by   remshowccm
    I am looking to relocate to Texas, so I will be more than happy if this is made possible.
  12. by   lucy100
    How long of an orientation did you receive? I believe the insurance company near me requires one to work at the company office for one year then transition to work from home. I would think having long term care experience has been helpful in this position. Thank you for the great article!
  13. by   Sweetbeth
    What is your pay range? Though it looks flexible but you still put a lot of time into it, great job!
  14. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from lucy100
    How long of an orientation did you receive? I believe the insurance company near me requires one to work at the company office for one year then transition to work from home. I would think having long term care experience has been helpful in this position. Thank you for the great article!
    I received about two weeks of general classroom orientation to the company, then another two weeks of classroom-based training that pertained directly to my role. After about four weeks in the office, I trained out in the field with a more experienced case manager.

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