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Can an LPN continue working at there old job as a CNA

Posted

Specializes in Nursing Home. Has 9 years experience.

Ok interesting legal question. Right now my facility is hiring alot of Nurses (LPNs). But in about 18 months when I hopefully get through my LPN program and pass licensure examination (hypothetically hopeful) if there are no LPN positions can I continue doing CNA duties as a nurse, until positions become available? And how woukd it be? Would I still be called CNA, or woukd I be called Nurse, but a Nurse who is partnered with an aide doing direct care duties. Is this legal or would I have to quit that job if no positions are available thanks!

GoosbyLPN

Specializes in Rehab, Geriatrics & School Nurse. Has 3 years experience.

Here in GA u can work as a CNA while licensed as an LPN

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 34 years experience.

The best place to find information on that, I have found to be state government departments of public health, such as the Department of Public Health in Illinois or the Department of Aging and Disability Services in Texas. There's a large amount of variability between the states.

A couple of articles I read stated that an RN or LPN can work as a CNA without committing a crime, but that you'll be held responsible for the same standard of care as those working as licensed nurses.

bugya90, ASN, BSN, LVN, RN

Specializes in Ambulatory Care-Family Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

In Texas you can work as a cna but will be paid as a cna and cannot do anything outside of the scope of a cna (pass meds, do treatments etc) but if an emergency were to happen you would be expected to perform to the best of your abilities so you would have to act as an lpn in an emergency. One of the bon reps that talked to our class before we graduated lpn school actually advised against doing this because of all the legality that could put both your cna and lpn licenses at risk. One mess up and you could lose both things that you worked very hard to get.

Even in the states in which working below your level of licensure is allowed by the BON, there are lots of employers that won't allow people to do it because of the complicated liability issues. When you are working in a position/role below your maximum level of education and licensure, your employer requires you to work within the scope of the position in which you're working and not do anything "more." However, if anything goes wrong enough for a situation to end up in court, the courts will hold you to the standards of your highest level of education and licensure, regardless of your job title or limits set by your employer at the time of the incident. This is why so many people recommend against doing this (or that individuals at least be aware of the risk they're taking if they do choose to do it). If employers do employ people to work below their level of licensure, it's sometimes because they're unscrupulous enough that they are just looking to get an RN or LPN job for CNA wages, and may pressure you to take on more responsibilities than the job/title permits.

OP, we've had people post here in the past that they were let go from their CNA jobs as soon as they finished nursing school and/or passed boards, with no warning, because the employer had a firm policy against people working below their licensure. You might want to ask in advance about your employer's policies so you don't end up with an unpleasant surprise. If they are going to let you go when you finish school, it would be good to at least know about that in advance. :)

Best wishes for your journey!

Does anyone know the regulations in NJ regarding an LPN working as a CNA? In NJ I believe you cannot work as a CNA after you receive your RN. I don't know how things work in NJ, but I know a couple of RN grads who were terminated as CNA's and then immediately rehired as RNs after they passed their NCLEX.

VictoriaGayle

Has 1 years experience.

If employers do employ people to work below their level of licensure, it's sometimes because they're unscrupulous enough that they are just looking to get an RN or LPN job for CNA wages, and may pressure you to take on more responsibilities than the job/title permits.

!

I'd be very afraid of that. That seems like the only real reason for hiring like that. Give someone the pay and workload of a CNA, expect them to do LPN duties on top of CNA duties, then if anything comes back on the facility blame it on them. We only authorized her to preform CNA duties!