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blackballed

I cannot prove it, but I know for a fact I've been blackballed by my own bosses at my job. Not only that, I believe they've blackballed me within the entire organization I work for. What are my options? I would to hate to leave the system permanently, but I believe my hands are tied for the moment. Do I have anything I can do legally, etc. hostile work environment?!? I've had interview for the other jobs I've applied to, but any job I've applied for in my current system, I get an IMMEDIATE 'thanks for playing' email. Please help. New grad who has done nothing wrong and doesn't deserve this. Must've hurt someone's feelings inadvertently....

flyersfan88

Specializes in Trauma, Orthopedics.

More details? What actually happened?

TU RN

Has 7 years experience. Specializes in ICU, PCU.

Politics is a game we all have to play, and specks of ******** here and there are the pieces. Make amends with management as best you can to advance your current situation and add as much experience to your resume as possible, all-the-while continuing to apply to other jobs on your free time. Once you have one lined up, quit and go to your new job.

All that said I must warn you: while I don't personally know your situation, there is a pretty good chance that you're experiencing the new grad phenomenon. Part of that is feeling like everyone dislikes you, that colleagues have an implicit goal to sabotage you, there's no way out, et cetera. Suppose your suspicions are just paranoia... don't go burning bridges with legitimate employers.

And as for applying to positions within the same organization. Of course you're not going to get them. The second you apply to them, the very same human resources department that hired you to your current area is notified. They probably communicated to your manager who then communicated to the new manager. I imagine the dialogue went something like: "we just hired this person and would like to have them in our employ still, as the position needs to be filled for our unit to function. please explore other candidates."

thanks for the reply TU RN. I highly doubt it's the new grad phenomenon. I've been at my current job for 2.5 years, however, not as a RN. I attempted to lateral transfer to another hospital, same type unit, but as a new RN grad. I've been told by other hospitals that I've interviewed with that I have 'quite the impressive resume', at least for a new grad I guess. This organization has lied to me, I've been mistreated by HR. At this point, I am nothing more than a name on a schedule. Where I work, unless you have that RED RN BADGE, you're scum. I will answer the above poster's question just after I type this. Thanks again for the advice.

I attempted to lateral transfer to another hospital (same organization), and the same type unit. I interviewed, it went well. I believed it to be a 'going thru the motions' type interview. I FULLY believed I'd have a job awaiting me after vacation. I got a call while on vacation from HR asking if they could contact my current boss. I said of course. From that point on I NEVER heard ONE thing back from anyone. Not HR, not the person who interviewed me. Nadda, nothing, crickets..... Even after phone messages left and emails sent, NONE were replied to. I want someone held accountable but I badly want a job in this healthcare system. I'm on eggshells is an understatement. Thanks again for your wisdom.. :)

If you sense that you are on the outs with your organization, you may be correct or you may be reading something into benign neglect that is not there. You will have to play this out as you see it. Remember that you have to maintain your livelihood. If you go around starting to make it known that you are not a happy camper, then they WILL have reason to look unfavorably upon you. As stated before, it is in your best interests to play the game as best you can until you can get to where you want to be. If that turns out to be a job somewhere else, then so be it.

This happens quite a great deal, and here is a take on perhaps why. You have been employed for 2.5 years by them. You have come up a step or 2 in your pay.

You ask around, and find out about positons, new grad positions--lots to be had within the system you currently work for. Managment will even throw you a bone or 2 and allude to the fact that you MAY be able to have a position when you pass the NCLEX. IF one HAPPENS to be available. So you work harder than ever, give your all and then some, go above and beyond to make a good impression because after all, it will benefit you when they are so excited as to what you bring to the table already.

Then comes the realization that because you have worked in another capacity for them, they may have to start your pay at a bit higher than another nurse who is a new grad that is not currently employed by them that they can start at less money. They may decide that unless you have a BSN, MSN or some certifications, they don't want you. BECAUSE- There's another unemployed nurse who has these things, and they can get that nurse for the lowest possible starting wage that they can say with a straight face. And there's more than one nurse that is at the point in their career where any money is better than no money. Then they have gotten over 2 years of really exceptional work from you--that reflects well on them.

Then comes the realization that they will not "under-employ" an RN, therefore, you need to find work elsewhere.

This is only a thought process, and may in fact be somewhat your reality. Start getting those resumes out. Do not limit yourself to your own organization, they are not the only game in town. Get as many reference letters as you can from other nurses with whom you have worked with. That speaks to your working character. Ask HR for copies of your performance evaluations. If you have had to take any certifications for your current job, have copies of those as well. Present yourself as a package--

Best of luck in your endevours!

Still further, and depending on what your current occupation with them now is, they would prefer someone who comes in with no preconceived notions--fresh and mold-able.

klone, MSN, RN

Has 14 years experience. Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

I'm not totally clear on your situation. Are you an RN? Are you working for this network as an RN or something else? Has there been one job application or has this happened multiple times?

I am currently an ED tech that passed nclex 2 months ago. So I'm already 'trained' in the ED atmosphere. Now I've advanced to RN. You would think I'd be an internal hire as a new grad. One BIG part of forgotten to tell you all is that I have a perfectly clean file. No write-ups, no call offs, no tardies, no pt complaints. Nothing!

klone, MSN, RN

Has 14 years experience. Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

Again, was this ONE job application, or has this happened several times? I think that if it was just one application, it's a bit of a reach to assume you've been blackballed. If it's happened repeatedly, well...

I've interviewed for ONE job in the system, the job I thought I was getting. I've applied and interviewed at 2 other ERs in neighboring cities to no avail. I've recently applied to 3 PT ER spots athe biggest hospital in my system and was immediately rejected. I don't know what to do. I'm so upset and stressed, it's taking a toll on me and my family.

klone, MSN, RN

Has 14 years experience. Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

Honestly, this sounds just like the plight of 70% of new grads right now. I'm sorry you're having a hard time. But I don't think what you are experiencing is being blackballed. It's being a new grad in a sea of thousands of other new grads.

I'll go with that, however, wouldn't you expect that one would be an internal hire over a random new grad. I'm cross trained as an ER tech and RN. I already possess most of the required certs of an ER RN. I might possibly have a quicker learning curve due to my time in an ER. Just playing devil's advocate. Thanks again for your insight. Greatly appreciated.

klone, MSN, RN

Has 14 years experience. Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

All else being equal, sure. But maybe the new grad they hired also had tech experience. Maybe they also know a foreign language. Maybe they've worked for 10 years as an LPN. Maybe they attended the same alma mater as the hiring manager. Lots of reasons why they would pick someone else over you, unfortunately.

TU RN

Has 7 years experience. Specializes in ICU, PCU.

Hah it doesn't really change much with one year of experience either, sad to say :\

Touche. :) Well even after listening to everyone's insight tonight, my gut tells me this is intentional. Maybe not full out 'blackballed', but more of maybe the 'we'll make you mad so you quit' route. I won't lie, they're close to getting their wish. I will not stoop to their unethical levels. I'll probably just take the high road, quit, and move on. I've no time for the negative energy any longer.

Some people get hired as internal hires and others do not. As long as you have worked in the institution, TPTB have had the opportunity to observe and evaluate you and decide that you do not meet whatever criteria they hold forth for the hire. If that is the case, you live with it or move on.

lub dub

Has 27 years experience.

I'll go with that, however, wouldn't you expect that one would be an internal hire over a random new grad. I'm cross trained as an ER tech and RN. I already possess most of the required certs of an ER RN. I might possibly have a quicker learning curve due to my time in an ER. Just playing devil's advocate. Thanks again for your insight. Greatly appreciated.

Now I am confused. If you are currently an ER tech, how can you be cross trained as an ER RN? Also, does your hospital hire new grads into the ER? Some hospitals require one year of med/surg experience before going to the ER, or critical care areas, regardless of the new grad's pre-license work experience. Being an ER tech does not equate to being an ER RN.

psu_213, BSN, RN

Has 6 years experience. Specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant.

Being an ER tech does not equate to being an ER RN.

Our ED hired someone who had been a tech in the department…she had a spotless record…after a month or, both sides knew it wasn't working out and she was allowed the "dignity" of resigning rather than being fired. Point is, EDs don't hire very many new grads, and it is doubtful our ED will do that again soon considering how badly we were burned on the last one.

psu_213, BSN, RN

Has 6 years experience. Specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant.

Touche. :) Well even after listening to everyone's insight tonight, my gut tells me this is intentional. Maybe not full out 'blackballed', but more of maybe the 'we'll make you mad so you quit' route. I won't lie, they're close to getting their wish. I will not stoop to their unethical levels. I'll probably just take the high road, quit, and move on. I've no time for the negative energy any longer.

Why do you think they are blackballing you? I know you said you have a good record--but why would ED management have the motivation to blackball you not only in the ED but in the entire hospital system? If your answer is "they have no reason to blackball me" then, in all likelihood, you are not being blackballed. JMHO

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