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Associates after Bachelors

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If you have a bachelors degree and then want to go back for an associates in something else (nursing, because an accelerated program isn't feasible right now), is it seen as a waste? and/ or would your bachelors be a waste?

Ive been looking into the ASN at the community college near me but this is holding me back. I am afraid what people will think.

I just didn't happen to realize nursing was a passion of mine at 18 when I first started college and didn't realize it until I was almost done with my bachelors.

lhflanurseNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Nurse Practitioner. Has 40 years experience.

If your area supports ASN graduate RN jobs, there is no reason not too. The exam is the same regardless of the degree and your license does not reflect the degree type...just that you are a RN. That being said, more and more areas are pushing for BSN trained RNs. In this case, you could still do an accelerated program.

Aurora77

Specializes in Med Surg. Has 4 years experience.

I did just that, in order to get into a program sooner. An accelerated BSN would have required a year of full time prerequisites, time I could spend in the nursing program. It didn't hurt me a bit. In fact, it made getting my BSN quicker when the time came because I only had nursing classes to complete.

I did just that, in order to get into a program sooner. An accelerated BSN would have required a year of full time prerequisites, time I could spend in the nursing program. It didn't hurt me a bit. In fact, it made getting my BSN quicker when the time came because I only had nursing classes to complete.

But my point being is that I feel like my precious bachelors will be a waste

BrandonLPN, LPN

Has 5 years experience.

But my point being is that I feel like my precious bachelors will be a waste

I don't understand. If you want to be an RN you will have to complete some form of a nursing program, be it ADN, BSN, diploma, whatever. What does your previous bachelors have to do with anything? You apparently do not want to pursue a career related to whatever your degree was in. So why worry about it now. Take whatever academic credits and life experience you can from it and move on.

You said you're afraid what others will think. Why? Honestly, no one will care one way or the other. Trust me, no one is spending any time thinking about you and whether or not your first degree was a waste. We tend to think others spend more time thinking about us then they actually do. People have their own problems to worry about.

What the PP said. If you are worried about what other people think, don't, no one will care.

Getting a ASN does not demean in any way your "precious bachelor's". It's not like you'll lose it.

Aurora77

Specializes in Med Surg. Has 4 years experience.

But my point being is that I feel like my precious bachelors will be a waste

Then use it and don't be a nurse. I don't believe any education is a waste.

SierraBravo

Has 3 years experience.

But my point being is that I feel like my precious bachelors will be a waste

I can totally understand what you mean here. I have a Bachelors degree and went through an accelerated BSN program. For me it made sense because I felt like I was "moving forward". I would have never gone to a community college to get an ASN because the hospitals in my city don't hire nearly as many ASN's as they do BSN's. Also, my perception would have been that I was academically "going backwards" if I were to go for an ASN after having already earned a Bachelors degree as well as graduate work.

However, so long as your community hires ASN's then it is a viable option. Then you could always do a RN-BSN program and you're right where you would have been if you did the accelerated BSN. Howcome you can't do the accelerated program right now? It really is the quickest option for those that already hold a Bachelors degree.

If you just can't do the accelerated program right now, and the ASN is your only option right now, then you just have to find a way to reframe your perception. And your previous Bachelors will never be a waste. You gained education and experience which you can bring with you to any further education and job.

I can totally understand what you mean here. I have a Bachelors degree and went through an accelerated BSN program. For me it made sense because I felt like I was "moving forward". I would have never gone to a community college to get an ASN because the hospitals in my city don't hire nearly as many ASN's as they do BSN's. Also, my perception would have been that I was academically "going backwards" if I were to go for an ASN after having already earned a Bachelors degree as well as graduate work.

However, so long as your community hires ASN's then it is a viable option. Then you could always do a RN-BSN program and you're right where you would have been if you did the accelerated BSN. Howcome you can't do the accelerated program right now? It really is the quickest option for those that already hold a Bachelors degree.

If you just can't do the accelerated program right now, and the ASN is your only option right now, then you just have to find a way to reframe your perception. And your previous Bachelors will never be a waste. You gained education and experience which you can bring with you to any further education and job.

I really appreciate your insight! And I cannot do an acceleratrd program because that would mean I can't work and I can't not work.

BrandonLPN, LPN

Has 5 years experience.

Well, it's not like getting an associates after getting a bachelors is "negative education" in a mathematical sense or something. Having a bachelors plus an associates is still "more" education than just having the bachelors. It's not going backwards in any way.

Anyone who'd think less of you for going to a community college is clearly a 100% snob.

I have a previous BS and couldn't do an accelerated BSN because I had to work too so I did an ASN program. The experience itself was good but know this, in the world of nursing/nurses, no cares about any previous degree.

One could have a PhD in Biology or Human Physiology and a Diploma from a hospital-based nursing program and there are many who would give more props to the Diploma than the PhD. I never experienced that in my other field.

I have a previous BS and couldn't do an accelerated BSN because I had to work too so I did an ASN program. The experience itself was good but know this, in the world of nursing/nurses, no cares about any previous degree.

One could have a PhD in Biology or Human Physiology and a Diploma from a hospital-based nursing program and there are many who would give more props to the Diploma than the PhD. I never experienced that in my other field.

They don't even help if you wanted to move up to a better position?

BrandonLPN, LPN

Has 5 years experience.

I have a previous BS and couldn't do an accelerated BSN because I had to work too so I did an ASN program. The experience itself was good but know this, in the world of nursing/nurses, no cares about any previous degree.

One could have a PhD in Biology or Human Physiology and a Diploma from a hospital-based nursing program and there are many who would give more props to the Diploma than the PhD. I never experienced that in my other field.

Well, any smart hiring manager would be impressed with an RN who also has a PhD in human physiology. I don't think it's fair to say no one cares about your previous degree. It will certainly help when you seek to move up the ladder, too.

But, yes, of course they care more about the diploma from the hospital nursing program. That being the one that enabled the applicant to become a RN and all. That's true of any career where licensure is a requirement.

They don't even help if you wanted to move up to a better position?

I don't think it's fair to say no one cares about your previous degree. It will certainly help when you seek to move up the ladder, too.

But one must, must, must get the required nursing degrees in addition to what you already have. I haven't seen any evidence that a previous degree means anything and I've been researching it since doing per-requs.

Maybe it's just my city- where bedside nurses are getting their DNP's and not planning on leaving bedside!! It's a big Eds and Meds city with multiple academic medical centers.

arrrrreeee you kidding me?!?!!?!!!?!?

i have a bs in neuroscience and then got my asn cause i couldn't afford to go get another bachelors due to financial aid only giving assistance for the first bachelors. so anyway, i got my ash, got a job in a hospital and then worked on my bsn after.

get over the stigma, you need to get your RN wherever you can. its a hard road ahead and if you are worried about what others think, you will have an even harder time.

CamillusRN

Specializes in OR, CVICU/CTICU.

I echo what the previous posters have said - there is no shame in getting an associate's after a bachelor's. I originally earned a bachelor's in sports medicine and became board-certified as an Exercise Physiologist. For reasons beyond my control, I had to relocate to an area where no one had even heard of an EP-c and couldn't land a job. I got my ADN at a local JuCo, fell in love with the challenging but rewarding profession, and am now preparing to get my MSN.

I would like to point out that your original degree doesn't have to be a waste. I still apply my sports medicine education on a regular basis in my nursing job and have kept my EP-c current as well. In this economy, a survivor must be willing to adjust to the environment to make a living. The route to your ultimate career may be circuitous, but you'll arrive where you are meant to be all the same and you will have grown into a very different person by the time you get there.

Red Kryptonite

Specializes in hospice. Has 3 years experience.

I'm in a certificate program to become a LPN 17 years after earning a bachelor's in political science. A long time ago I was going to go to law school. Life takes turns, and no education is ever a waste. I didn't become a lawyer and have never used that BA for employment, but I've used it. I home schooled my children for several years and have continued to educate them. I evaluate events and trends in a historical context, and that makes me a better citizen. I plan to someday run for office, so maybe it will be handy then, or maybe not, but it's never a waste.

calivianya, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

They don't even help if you wanted to move up to a better position?

All nursing really cares about is nursing degrees. I believe previous degrees have personal value to the applicant, but a Ph.D is no different from an associate's to a recruiter if none of it's in nursing. I learned a lot in my previous bachelor's but I am well aware I'm the only person who cares that I have it.

If your previous degree is in business, that would probably be an asset if you are applying for a nurse manager position down the road, but if you're just going to be working as a bedside nurse a previous degree is irrelevant.