Jump to content

Art of Nursing

Published

Nurses are old and young, tall and short, skinny and wide. We come from all walks of life. Some choose to enter the nursing profession for job security, others to help those around them. Throughout our schooling, we are taught and tested on the science of nursing. Our primary focus is the ability to recall important facts, to think ahead of the current situation, and to understand interactions between the patient and the interventions we provide.

Art of Nursing

Nurses are old and young, tall and short, skinny and wide. We come from all walks of life. Some choose to enter the nursing profession for job security, others to help those around them. Throughout our schooling, we are taught and tested on the science of nursing. Our primary focus is the ability to recall important facts, to think ahead of the current situation, and to understand interactions between the patient and the interventions we provide.

Elusive, yet widely recognized, the art of nursing is our ability to connect with those around us. It is only when we begin direct patient care that we become aware of the art of nursing. The word art can be used to describe the results of a particular task as well as the knowledge and skill required to perform that task. Like other more fashionable art forms, nursing can be dramatic, inspirational, comedic, relaxing, comforting, joyful, and even sad. Nursing is also creative, existential, and has a particular rhythm. This intangible connection can create an environment of healing, one that allows patients to fully participate in their own recovery process.

My great-great-aunt Mae was a nurse at the turn of the 19th Century. Seven days a week, she hitched-up her horse and buggy to provide medical care and comfort in her rural community. When the local veterinarian was busy, she would also help care for local horses and cattle. Later, she became a psychiatric nurse, and even later a nurse educator. Nursing allowed her to travel, meet new people, and provide for independence that most women couldn't attain in that time period. For her, nursing meant freedom and the ability to be her own person.

My great-aunt Marge became a nurse in the late 1930s. She initially worked in a small country hospital. When World War II erupted, she moved to a bigger city to care for veterans on a medical ward. As she provided these brave men with physical care, she also performed assessments and interventions to help relieve their psychological pain. She felt that her calling at that time was to heal their damaged spirits. Though her career spanned many decades and various nursing specialties, it is this work that brought her the most joy and great professional pride.

When I decided on a career in nursing, I knew none of this. I had worked in healthcare settings since I was 15 years old, and always knew I wanted to work in a patient care environment. I readily learned the tasks I needed to perform whatever job I was assigned. But more than that, I could easily connect with my patients on a level deeper than I expected. Patients would open up to me. Even at the tender age of 16, I had elderly patients share their fears of death and dying with me - seeking comfort

Nurses teach, support, communicate, medicate, and coordinate patient-care events. Nurses are patient advocates who provide comfort and hope to our patients and their families. The art of nursing is in play when we just 'know' what to do to meet a patient's emotional needs: when to hold a patient's hand, stroke their brow, crack a joke or even just sit and listen. Most of this is being accomplished simultaneously during each patient interaction.

The science of nursing allows us to care for our patient's bodies, but it's the art of nursing that calls me to the profession and allows each nurse to touch souls.

RN, CCRN, SANE-A, etc ....

3 Articles   22 Posts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

26 Comment(s)

zuzi

Specializes in trauma, ortho, burns, plastic surgery.

NMSAne you are a soo beautiful nurse soul, thank you!

Great, this may help us motivate ourselves :icon_smile:(especially me :thankya:)

mianders, RN

Specializes in ER, Infusion therapy, Oncology. Has 13 years experience.

What a wonderful post. :yelclap:

NMSANE

Thanks for the great posting. To be honest, I have become a bit discouraged by some of the recent postings I have seen on this site about men in nursing, why nurses are so angry, etc. I am a male and took the pre-admission exam in Oct and am applying to an ADN program to start next Sept. But after seeing many of the other postings over the past few weeks, I was starting to seriously question my decision to apply to nursing school, what with all the negative energy I was perceiving from the many postings. But thank goodness for a ray of sunshine among the clouds! Thanks for your posting. It made my day :-)

CaLLaCoDe, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology, Oncology, Medsurge.

Very well crafted essay! A+A+A+

hi,

you have a very inspiring and wonderful post...if you don't mind I'll have this reposted in my site for the benefit of the nursing students here in the Philippines.

mitch

Awwwww, thanks guys (and gals too). :thankya:

I think we all get discouraged about our work, after all most of us chose nursing for more than a paycheck, we chose it as some sort of calling AND the paycheck. Since we work with folks during some of the toughest events in their lives, there is often negativity .. and lordy that same nastiness colors our own communication at times. I hope we can all remember to thank each other, and to treat each other well so we can heal ourselves and our coworkers, in addition to healing our patients :yeah:

I"m post shift - tired and a bit rambly. But thank you for taking the time to read my little thing, and thank you for making me smile.

emtn2b

Specializes in ER, Tele.

Hello!

I agree, this is so positive and it gives one hope that nursing isn't so bad after all. This is my second day on this site and so far it has been great meeting people like you. Keep sharing.

Thanks,

brause

Specializes in operating room.

....that`s the point..........

Thank you for this article

brause

such a lovely article!:up::yelclap:. i felt great after I read it. A great reminder of the oath I took years ago. Because we both know that sometimes we tend to have that routinely behavior and get burned out of the things we do. thanks for the post! Wishing you another Blessed New Year

The last line of your article says it all. Thank you for an inside look.:balloons:

FranEMTnurse, CNA, LPN, EMT-I

Specializes in LTC, CPR instructor, First aid instructor.. Has 24 years experience.

Wonderful message NMSANE. It equals a Florence Nightengale message.

What a beautiful picture! I don't think I'd miss the days of dresses and caps ... but you could certainly feel the pride of ownership for those who are wearing them in your photo.

{hugs**

kwamekat1984

Specializes in general nursing. Has 3 years experience.

nursing is a kool profession and very interesting and new knowledge keeps on coming.

nursing is art because there is creation in nursing.

thxn all for ur comments