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Any INTJ personality nurses out there...I need help in choosing any advance nursing car

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by BlackRN BlackRN (New Member) New Member

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pedicurn specializes in CVICU, Obs/Gyn, Derm, NICU.

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I hear you, because I had some misconceptions about nursing as well. I had my own doubts prior to taking the plunge. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but I really think you just don't know until you see what nurses really do all day. What are you basing your opinion of the functions of a nurse on? Have you actually been able to be in a hospital shadowing a nurse? If you haven't, it might be a good idea to do that a few times. I also may have a different perspective. My clinical rotation is currently at a large teaching hospital, and I also work there on the weekends. The nurses are constantly learning, and there is a lot of collaborative care going on in this environment.

Good luck in your career choice. Not everyone can or should be a nurse or a lawyer, so it's great that we all make different choices.

I am basing my views on *cough cough* on being in nursing for a long time - at least two decades. Plus a BSN and a masters.

Also concurrently having had corporate experience.

Lots of bedside plus also administrative nursing experience

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5,568 Visitors; 352 Posts

I am basing my views on *cough cough* on being in nursing for a long time - at least two decades. Plus a BSN and a masters.

Also concurrently having had corporate experience.

Lots of bedside plus also administrative nursing experience

Lol. You sure you've given it enough time? :D

Another INTJ here. I always wanted to be a physicist.....

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pedicurn specializes in CVICU, Obs/Gyn, Derm, NICU.

8,728 Visitors; 696 Posts

Lol. You sure you've given it enough time? :D

Another INTJ here. I always wanted to be a physicist.....

My first instincts prior to nursing school were the physical sciences, law and business.

Not all at once though :lol2:

I understand these are good fields for an INTJ.

I love geology so would love to do that.

But business would allow me to use some creative thinking skills and I would love that.

LOL it's been a long time but nursing has afforded me quite a lot of flexibility ...which the other areas don't.

Better late than never :)

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13,275 Visitors; 2,801 Posts

Lol. You sure you've given it enough time? :D

:p That made me laugh!

Bedside clinical nursing definitely involves problem-solving - it just tends to be more pulling-the-drowning-villagers-from-the-rushing-river problem-solving versus why-the-heck-are-so-many-villagers-falling-in-the-river-in-the-first-place problem-solving. Both are valuable problem-solving skills! I'm better at the latter but if I'm in acute crisis I sure as heck want someone good at the former by my side!

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pedicurn specializes in CVICU, Obs/Gyn, Derm, NICU.

8,728 Visitors; 696 Posts

:p That made me laugh!

Bedside clinical nursing definitely involves problem-solving - it just tends to be more pulling-the-drowning-villagers-from-the-rushing-river problem-solving versus why-the-heck-are-so-many-villagers-falling-in-the-river-in-the-first-place problem-solving. Both are valuable problem-solving skills! I'm better at the latter but if I'm in acute crisis I sure as heck want someone good at the former by my side!

LOL !!

I don't think we have too many nurses with the latter skills and I believe that's unfortunate .... because 'other' starts taking that up and that's bad for nursing when we lose control.

By 'other' I mean the non-nursing business managers and consultants, or even nurse leaders without much bedside and knowledge of the 'nuts and bolts' of nursing.

The processes surrounding the 'why are the villagers falling into the river' are hugely important to the practice of nursing and when the 'other' start fiddling with them ... we feel the profound effect.

However we need to wonder why the latter skill set is not nurtured, valued ...and even required, in nursing ???

If it's not considered part of the job, then we shouldn't be so surprised when 'other' takes control. :mad:

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5,568 Visitors; 352 Posts

LOL !!

I don't think we have too many nurses with the latter skills and I believe that's unfortunate .... because 'other' starts taking that up and that's bad for nursing when we lose control.

By 'other' I mean the non-nursing business managers and consultants, or even nurse leaders without much bedside and knowledge of the 'nuts and bolts' of nursing.

The processes surrounding the 'why are the villagers falling into the river' are hugely important to the practice of nursing and when the 'other' start fiddling with them ... we feel the profound effect.

However we need to wonder why the latter skill set is not nurtured, valued ...and even required, in nursing ???

If it's not considered part of the job, then we shouldn't be so surprised when 'other' takes control. :mad:

What gets me is nurses who don't realise the 'why are the villagers falling into the river' question even exists. And yep, when we leave it to others to figure it out, they come up with things like flying the villagers over the river or cutting off all access to the river, rather than building a simple footbridge and teaching the villagers to swim. :rolleyes:

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being a CRNA is a lot more than intubation and playing around with the anesthesia machine. As I have mentioned before, airway management is, in and of itself, an art. If it looked easy and boring, you were shadowing a good, skilled CRNA.

If you are very independent, go to anesthesia school and work in a hospital in which there is only CRNA anesthesia or where the MDAs don't smother the CRNAs. The responsibility and variety will keep you on your toes.

No two intubations are alike, no two spinals, epidurals, blocks are alike. You will encounter a wide assortment of cases, especially on call, and will use every bit of your education unless you find yourself in a "team" environment where the MDAs won't let you breathe without permission. Fortunately, those are relatively rare.

I have worked in all sorts of anesthesia environments: solo anesthesia provider, team member where the MDAs were around in the daytime but didn't interfere and actually fostered independence and acquisition of new skills, and in "team" settings in which the MDAs stifled any independent thought or action.

I like autonomy and work best in the first two types.

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I had to take this test years ago before I started my statistician job. I was an INTJ then and I still am now.

As a young child, I used to people watch and listen to everything around me. It was as if the things they said or the things they were doing were pieces of a puzzle, and here I was with other pieces to their puzzle--enough to get them out of their situation. I wanted to prevent things from happening; actually, I still do. Everything was related to numbers some how. Over the years, I noticed personality trait patterns among certain groups of people.

It was in the 6th/7th grade where I learned what a geneticist does. After that, I knew I wanted to be a scientist--geneticist. But that didn't work out. So I ended up becoming a statistician.

I had a love/hate relationship with my job. After my first year I felt like there was something missing from my job. I think it was human contact. I love to learn about people. I love listening to them and watching them. I love seeing them progress in anything in life. I especially enjoy seeing children develop from infants into whoever they choose to become.

I love being an INTJ. I may not be as social as other people, but I think I have a lot to offer the nursing profession--just as the majority of us do.

Wow, I apologize for talking about myself so much--there are really a lot of "I's" in my message.

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So I ended up becoming a statistician.

I'm curious about this... are you also a nurse or have a background in nursing? Did you intentionally aim to become a statistician or was it a 'just sorta fell into it' thing? What's that field look like going forward? Would you recommend it to anyone?

I enjoyed my biostatistics course in school but nursing seemed so much more practical ('always in demand'). I appreciate your sharing about your experience and I relate to it. I do best with a balance between working alone (focused, analyzing) and working with people (collaborating, directly assisting)... maybe an 80/20 balance? 70/30? In my current data management role in a health facility, I find myself leaning towards the numbers/systems side and away from the nitty gritty rubber-meets-the-road clinical aspect. However, I think I'm pretty good at translating between the gray world of clinical care (every case is different, health care provision is not an assembly line) and the more black and white world of administration (policies, check boxes, bottom lines).

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14,862 Visitors; 937 Posts

I'm curious about this... are you also a nurse or have a background in nursing? Did you intentionally aim to become a statistician or was it a 'just sorta fell into it' thing? What's that field look like going forward? Would you recommend it to anyone?

I enjoyed my biostatistics course in school but nursing seemed so much more practical ('always in demand'). I appreciate your sharing about your experience and I relate to it. I do best with a balance between working alone (focused, analyzing) and working with people (collaborating, directly assisting)... maybe an 80/20 balance? 70/30? In my current data management role in a health facility, I find myself leaning towards the numbers/systems side and away from the nitty gritty rubber-meets-the-road clinical aspect. However, I think I'm pretty good at translating between the gray world of clinical care (every case is different, health care provision is not an assembly line) and the more black and white world of administration (policies, check boxes, bottom lines).

I am a student nurse.

I think statisticians will, and should, always be utilized. They are extremely valuable, especially for quality issues. They have the ability to tell a highly detailed story with just a few numbers--it's amazing and that's the part I miss. I think colleges and large corporations mostly utilize statisticians for research. If I were still interested in maintaining my old position, I would think that my future looks pretty bright, because there's not many of us anyway.

If you're looking to improve your social skills or make new friends, I would not recommend this type of career. It's like always being on the outside looking in. I didn't have many friends at my old job. I think it was because a lot of people found me difficult to connect with. I have a tendency to view my family, friends, patients, and strangers as research subjects. But since I've left my job, I'm a lot more social and I think my social skills have improved tremendously. Although, my statistician side will probably never leave me; and I would not want it to.

I hope I've helped.

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Hello, I just stumbled upon your post and had to comment. I am an INTJ who is just now trying to get into the Entry-Level to the MSN program with my BS degree that I am actually nearly completing now. I was doing computer graphics for over 20-some years and for the past 14 years I have worked in Continuing Medical Education. I have enjoyed the mix of healthcare and computers and did a report in one of my classes on Nursing Informatics, which really spiked my interest. Your post does have me really taking a good hard look at whether I should pursue nursing or perhaps change gears. I am a hopeless researcher and after analyzing the INTJ personality, perhaps I am more interested in Nursing School vs. the Nursing profession. I think our type is more of a scientist, I'm thinking Biomedical Science with research may be a better avenue for me. I can spend all day on the computer researching various topics. I am currently at a 4.0 GPA and if I weren't 45 years old I would consider Medical School myself to be more challenged than with what Nursing provides. Best of luck to you. Let us know what you decide.

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Bluee has 3 years experience.

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What's with some of the fatalism regarding INTJ and nursing? That an INTJ is likely to make a subpar nurse? Hogwash.

The test's classifications have limitations; each classification is most accurate and valid when you score highly in each of the categories. If you score low in a category (i.e. close to zero, close to the midline), your personality trait is likely to fluctuate and possibly never be that strong in either direction.

Example... I'm an INTJ. I took the full version test in adolescence, which does a good job of weighting for each category. I'm a profound IN, with a strong J, but my T is close to the midline. In practice and life, I'm usually a very rational and logical person (typical INTJ), but I'm also able to flip a switch and crank up the empathy (typical INFJ, counselor type). So I'm an INTJ, but also an INFJ.

A lot of things can be faked or acted, but not empathy or rational thought. Play to your strengths while not pigeonholing yourself too hard. Empathy is not a requirement for nursing, as shocking as that sounds. You don't need empathy to critically think. You don't need empathy to assess the medical problems of your patient. You don't need empathy to feel good about yourself after doing an awesome job. In fact, a lack of empathy should afford you with a persistent clarity of thought that many another would be envious of :devil:

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