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Any ex Premeds?

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by Premed2hard Premed2hard (New) New Student

Premed2hard specializes in College ex high achiever.

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Premed2hard specializes in College ex high achiever.

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52 minutes ago, TuxnadoDO said:

my horrific DO program managed to prepare me well enough to score in the 99th percentile on USMLE step 1 and 2 (yes, I took them), ace my clinical years and practically have my pick of EM residencies (allopathic.)

but hey if you’d rather be a nurse than a lowly DO, you know, more power to you. I mean that sincerely, if you could be happy in the nursing field, you should definitely do that rather than dedicating the next 7+ years of your life to medical training. Don’t take up a DO spot if you’re half-hearted about it, there’s plenty of students grinding away for that spot.

2

Maybe you went to a highly rated DO school. Nova (for instance) is trash imo.

If you have lived on SDN many have had poor DO experiences.

DO is med school, but all DO schools are not created equal. There are many threads on SDN "DO schools to avoid, DON"T go to XXX DO school, DO school dropout rates are rising!"

I think your high scores are much more an indicator of your ability than the school's ability to teach.

Thank you for all of the replies seems there are not many premeds that became nurses just nurses that became or are becoming MD's that peruse this site.

Good luck to all in whatever endeavors you choose 🙂

Edited by Premed2hard

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Hey I am in that boat. I am currently in an ABSN program. I would caution you against jumping into an ABSN program if your heart is set on being a doctor. Maybe you should should shadow some RNs first and see if what they do interests you. I did not do that and am now struggling with this decision I made. There are options for advanced practice beyond the RN, but the scope of practice is still more limited than a physician's scope (as it should be in my opinion). If you can get a job as an ED tech or CNA II that would also give you some insight into the hospital system and allow you to compare physician vs RN scope.

There is no rush and you are only competing against yourself. Good luck.

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Tegridy specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

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29 minutes ago, Premed2hard said:

Maybe you went to a highly rated DO school. Nova (for instance) is trash imo.

If you have lived on SDN many have had poor DO experiences.

DO is med school, but all DO schools are not created equal. There are many threads on SDN "DO schools to avoid, DON"T go to XXX DO school, DO school dropout rates are rising!"

I think your high scores are much more an indicator of your ability than the school's ability to teach.

Thank you for all of the replies seems there are not many premeds that became nurses just nurses that became or are becoming MD's that peruse this site.

Good luck to all in whatever endeavors you choose 🙂

Even at the worst places most people match. The drop out rate of many nursing schools is higher than that of medical schools also

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Tegridy specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

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12 hours ago, Tegridy said:

Even at the worst places most people match. The drop out rate of many nursing schools is higher than that of medical schools also

I don’t go to nova but it’s hard to take someone serious who is a premed that calls medics schools trash lol

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Premed2hard specializes in College ex high achiever.

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3 minutes ago, Tegridy said:

I don’t go to nova but it’s hard to take someone serious who is a premed that calls medics schools trash lol

Nova: three of the four last years have declining first-time COMLEX pass rates. They're now at ~85% and on top of this, some 7% of their 2018 grads failed to match. This was the second worst match rate among all the COMs (only WCU did worse). These are things you expect from a new school, not a veteran. Something is very wrong there.

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TuxnadoDO specializes in Emergency medicine.

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2 hours ago, Premed2hard said:

Nova: three of the four last years have declining first-time COMLEX pass rates. They're now at ~85% and on top of this, some 7% of their 2018 grads failed to match. This was the second worst match rate among all the COMs (only WCU did worse). These are things you expect from a new school, not a veteran. Something is very wrong there.

Those stats are good to keep in mind, once you have an acceptance to multiple schools and can then choose where you want to go. What’s the match rate for people who don’t go to medical school?

tegrity and I are picking up on a very odd vibe here. You either want to be a doctor or you don’t. If you do, you work your *** off, you apply to all the schools, and then you can choose where you go among them. Thinking that an osteopathic school is beneath you because their board passing rates or residency matching rates have declined is insane, when your Plan B is a much less in depth, less thorough education with no medical residency.

it seems like you’re looking for reasons not to go for it. I don’t know if you need to be encouraged and told to shoot for the stars, or if you need to be told that if you’re that hesitant then you shouldn’t embark on that venture. only you know what you want.

I would tell you that if the idea of being a physician loses its luster simply because the “MD“ is replaced with a “DO” then you are probably not the kind of person we want in medical school at all.

Edited by TuxnadoDO

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Tegridy specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

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1 hour ago, TuxnadoDO said:

Those stats are good to keep in mind, once you have an acceptance to multiple schools and can then choose where you want to go. What’s the match rate for people who don’t go to medical school?

tegrity and I are picking up on a very odd vibe here. You either want to be a doctor or you don’t. If you do, you work your *** off, you apply to all the schools, and then you can choose where you go among them. Thinking that an osteopathic school is beneath you because their board passing rates or residency matching rates have declined is insane, when your Plan B is a much less in depth, less thorough education with no medical residency.

it seems like you’re looking for reasons not to go for it. I don’t know if you need to be encouraged and told to shoot for the stars, or if you need to be told that if you’re that hesitant then you shouldn’t embark on that venture. only you know what you want.

I would tell you that if the idea of being a physician loses its luster simply because the “MD“ is replaced with a “DO” then you are probably not the kind of person we want in medical school at all.

He also seems to be leaving out that most Rn programs have a very high attrition rate. It’s not like you get in and automatically pass. I think mine had a 45% pass rate. Not due to difficulty but due to lack of entry barrier. My class in med school likely will have a 85% pass rate with a 96-100% placement rate. There are risks with everything.

the job market for physicians is also 1000000% times better than for nursing dispite what the BLS says

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On 2/16/2020 at 1:28 PM, Tegridy said:

Whoa whoa your stats aren’t that bad. You could get into a DO school. I would absolutely advise against the Caribbean route as step 1 will be going pass/fail in a few years and it makes it harder to stand out

I saw a few comments like this on this thread and am curious; I have known and worked with several doctors (MDs) who went to schools in the Caribbean and are excellent physicians. In the few times it came up in conversation I always got the impression that the reputation of poor education was not justified, and these doctors went on to brilliant residencies in the States without a problem. What is it that is changing beyond the grading system, or has the education itself actually changed?

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I was forced to fire a PCP who, I found out, had gone to a Carribbean school. He was so blatant in his misogynistic, paternalistic treatment of me, that I could not even stand to see him a third time. I noted that, for some reason, he felt it necessary to expound on his PA or NP wife. I wondered how she played a part in his inability to speak to a female patient with basic courtesy. While I noted his Caribbean medical education, I did not blame that for him turning into "that" kind of doctor.

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40 minutes ago, Waiting for Retirement said:

I saw a few comments like this on this thread and am curious; I have known and worked with several doctors (MDs) who went to schools in the Caribbean and are excellent physicians. In the few times it came up in conversation I always got the impression that the reputation of poor education was not justified, and these doctors went on to brilliant residencies in the States without a problem. What is it that is changing beyond the grading system, or has the education itself actually changed?

Its hard for any IMGs to get into residency in the US. It's also very expensive (300-400k). Basically, If you go to Carribbean and you dont get into a residency here in the states, you’re stuck with all these loans and have no way to pay for them.

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Tegridy specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-1.

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45 minutes ago, Waiting for Retirement said:

I saw a few comments like this on this thread and am curious; I have known and worked with several doctors (MDs) who went to schools in the Caribbean and are excellent physicians. In the few times it came up in conversation I always got the impression that the reputation of poor education was not justified, and these doctors went on to brilliant residencies in the States without a problem. What is it that is changing beyond the grading system, or has the education itself actually changed?

More just because step 1 is becoming pass/fail and Caribbean students will have a harder time getting into residency than they already have. Usually now the Caribbean docs who land decent residencies in the US are too of their class since many do not get residency. I can’t speak for the quality of education of Caribbean schools

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22 hours ago, Tegridy said:

More just because step 1 is becoming pass/fail and Caribbean students will have a harder time getting into residency than they already have. Usually now the Caribbean docs who land decent residencies in the US are too of their class since many do not get residency. I can’t speak for the quality of education of Caribbean schools

Gotcha. Interesting, as the only knowledge I have of it is from those who didn't have issues getting residencies and honestly I can't believe ALL of them were top of their classes, but who knows. Fresh information is good to have, thanks 🙂

22 hours ago, Levophed1 said:

Its hard for any IMGs to get into residency in the US. It's also very expensive (300-400k). Basically, If you go to Carribbean and you dont get into a residency here in the states, you’re stuck with all these loans and have no way to pay for them.

Good to know! Like I just responded to Tegridy, I was under the impression that the residency in the US wasn't really an issue, they all got placed. Didn't ever discuss costs, either. What a system 😞

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