Allied Medical Training RN to EMT Bridge

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Flight Nursing: Should I Do RN To EMT Program At AMT?

I'm not here to start a debate or argument about whether an RN should get their EMT or anything along those lines. My question is simple: Has anyone here done the RN to EMT bridge program AMT offers and if so I just have a few follow up questions. Would you recommend the program? Can it be done completely online except for the skills test? And is the true cost only $523 as advertised on the website? 

I would really appreciate any input about this program or other online RN to EMT or just EMT programs. 

Thanks everybody, hope you all had a really good Thanksgiving this past week! 🙂 

hppygr8ful, ASN, RN, EMT-I

4 Articles; 4,678 Posts

Specializes in Psych, Addictions, SOL (Student of Life). Has 21 years experience.

I haven’t taken the program you speak of but I was an EMT prior to getting my  RN . EMT is a lower level of care than RN so my question is why do you want to go backwards? If you are already an RN why become an EMT where you will earn far less money? You can work for an ambulance co with your RN or get your MICN and get all the excitement of an EMT for way more money! Just my thoughts.

Specializes in Med/Surg.
1 hour ago, hppygr8ful said:

I haven’t taken the program you speak of but I was an EMT prior to getting my  RN . EMT is a lower level of care than RN so my question is why do you want to go backwards? If you are already an RN why become an EMT where you will earn far less money? You can work for an ambulance co with your RN or get your MICN and get all the excitement of an EMT for way more money! Just my thoughts.

Again, I don't mean to turn this discussion into a debate as I have noticed that often times this topic can become a bit heated for some reason or the other. Why people are so passionate about what other people do with their time and resources, I don't know. 

But, to answer your question. You actually hit the nail on the head. My career goal is to be a flight nurse. However, I am a new-grad nurse. I have worked for about 6 months. I'm currently on a med/surg floor. To make a long story short, I have always been interested in flight nursing since I decided to pursue nursing but nursing school was very difficult for me and I often didn't even think I would graduate, let alone pass the NCLEX. So I gave up on that dream thinking I would never be smart enough or capable enough to actually get it. I ended up graduating with my BSN and I passed the NCLEX on my first try. I had already secured my current job months before graduation through my hospital tech experience at another hospital within the same system. After actually finishing school and passing the NCLEX, I realized that if I put my mind to it and work hard, I might actually have a shot at a flight nurse job down the road. Obviously, there is a lot of experience needed to even be considered for that job, experience I am years away from having. I am going to stay where I currently am and finish my first year as a nurse here. While it isn't experience that directly benefits my dream, I am learning so much as a med/surg nurse that I know will benefit me as a nurse in general. When I do finish my first year, I am going to look for an ER job at one of the two level one trauma centers near me and begin working on getting the years of experience I need in both the ER and ICU. Along with ER/ICU experience, I figured having some EMS experience would help make me more competitive and the adrenaline rush of EMS has always appealed to me. 

Also, I think it's important to note: I am not looking to leave nursing to become a full time EMT. There are PRN EMT positions in my area. I am just looking for a side job and yes I am aware that I could make even more money if I found a PRN nursing job but with my level of experience - I'm not going to get a PRN nursing job. I have already tried that. 

hppygr8ful, ASN, RN, EMT-I

4 Articles; 4,678 Posts

Specializes in Psych, Addictions, SOL (Student of Life). Has 21 years experience.

Not trying to start a debate I encourage you to go for your dreams. We don’t all take the same path to our goals and the journey is often filled with life lessons.

one thing though is the supposed adrenaline rush of being and EMT. It really doesn’t exist. Must of your time is spent shuttling people back and forth to nursing homes. S I would encourage you to go to the ER after your first year and after that pursue the MICN which will prepare you for flight nursing.

Good luck on your journey!

hppy

Specializes in Med/Surg.

I appreciate your feedback and advice! I had not heard of MICN and I am looking into that now to see if there are any opportunities for that specialty in my area.

hppygr8ful, ASN, RN, EMT-I

4 Articles; 4,678 Posts

Specializes in Psych, Addictions, SOL (Student of Life). Has 21 years experience.
1 hour ago, Chuckleface said:

I appreciate your feedback and advice! I had not heard of MICN and I am looking into that now to see if there are any opportunities for that specialty in my area.

It stands for Mobile Intensive Care Nurse which you can often train for in bigger trauma centers.

NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN

11 Articles; 17,554 Posts

Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 46 years experience.

Mobile Intensive Care Nurse -- MICN links below,  not all states have this credential.  2-3 years ER/ICU experience required in some states;  for Flight Nursing ICU experience preferred.

In PA, ICU experience preferred for flight nurse.

Wiki: Mobile Intensive Care Nurse

Air and Surface Transport Nurse Assoc.

California:

Sacramento Co.:   https://dhs.saccounty.gov/PUB/EMS/Pages/Certification Pages/SP-Mobile-Intensive-Care-Nurse-Certification-MICN.aspx

LA County: https://file.lacounty.gov/SDSInterikiL/dhs/206046_1010.pdf

NJ regs: https://www.nj.gov/health/ems/documents/reg-enforcement/njac841r.pdf

PA:  Prehospital RN regs

Harrisburg PA Community College Pre-Hospital Registered Nurse (PHRN) Certificate (0027)  260 hrs  Once you complete the program, you are eligible to attend a Pennsylvania Department of Health/National Registry of EMT’s psychomotor exam and complete the National Registry of EMT’s Paramedic Assessment exam.

https://examcenter911.com/rrmicn-rapid-response-mobile-intensive-care-nurse/

 Hope this helps your goals.

 

Wuzzie

4,895 Posts

If your goal is flight nursing most quality programs require at least 3 years of experience in a high acuity ICU ( SICU/CICU is usually preferred). Experience with balloon pumps and LVADs will put you near the top of the candidate list. If you can, get your CCN certification but know that you will need to get your CFRN usually within a year from hire into a flight program. Some programs will take less experience and some will also consider ED nursing. If you go the CCT route having your EMT may be a requirement as some states have a stupid rule that there has to be at least 1 EMT in the back of the truck regardless of the credentials of the transport staff. If you have the time I’d skip the EMT and get your paramedic. More bang for your buck. A side hustle as an EMT may give you some spending money but won’t really impress the judges when you interview for a flight job. Happy is right, it’s mostly just shuttling grandma and grandpa to doctors appointments. Also, make sure you keep your weight under control…it’s a thing. And finally, remember, for every flight opening there are about 50 applicants. You might not make it the first time but keep trying.  

Specializes in Med/Surg.

First of all, I really appreciate all of this help, advice, and insight. Thank you for each of y'alls responses.

Through the research I have done, I came to understand that in order to meet the qualifications to be a flight nurse I would need a minimum of 5 years of combined ER and ICU experience which is why I was looking at an ER position. However, would you advise I instead look for an ICU position? My original plan has been to leave the floor and go to an ER for 2-3 years and then go to the ICU for another 2-3 years and then take that experience, along with any EMS experience earned along the way and apply for a flight nurse position. All ER/ ICU experience will also be in a level 1 trauma center to increase my experience and bolster my resume. 

Considering the fact that flight nurses collaborate with EMS on a regular basis, it seems logical to me that having some experience in EMS would prove to be beneficial. I was actually considering getting my paramedic. My nearest technical college is offering $0 tuition and my plan was to enroll there and earn my paramedic through them. However, I called them this morning and discussed the idea with them. You have to have your EMT first before you can pursue paramedic training, I already understood this but was under the impression I would be able to get this certification through them first and then go on to get my paramedic. That is possible, however they do not offer an online variation of this program. I would have to attend all lectures in person on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday. That class schedule simply will not work for me at this time. On top of that, even if I do get my EMT from an online source such as AMT, in order to get my paramedic certification I would have to complete about 180 hours of unpaid ride time (I may not have that number exactly right). That requirement would pull me away from my wife a lot and I would hardly be home since I would also have to continue working full time on top of that - we already went through that when I was completing my practicum and also working as a tech at the same time and I don't want to put her through that again. With all of this considered, it seems that the highest patch for me to pursue at this time is EMT-B. However, I am beginning to question if that is even worth it after reading y'alls responses.

As far as the weight thing, that is probably one of the few things about being a thin guy that actually works in my favor.

Wuzzie

4,895 Posts

I’d start with ICU first. That’s the meat and potatoes of flight nursing. 

vampiregirl, BSN, RN

1 Article; 794 Posts

Specializes in Hospice. Has 13 years experience.

I would also encourage you to look at your state EMS statutes, some states allow RNs to either "challenge" their state EMT exam or offer a shortened/ streamlined process. 

Keep in mind that nursing and EMS have some different theories of care and approaches. So if you are interested in EMS, make sure you take the time to understand these. 

Another consideration is scope of practice. If you opt to venture into EMS, make 100% sure you are familiar with the EMT scope of practice if you are working in that role. Your assessment skills will always be judged at your highest licensure but you are limited to skills within your designated scope of practice and standing orders.

I'm an RN who very much enjoys volunteering for our local Fire Department EMS. And I will also say that my EMS skills have come in handy in my nursing experience as well.