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adn graduate

can an adn graduate get into an icu position right after graduating from an adn program, or do they have to work there way up.

I have asked that a lot. The answer I get most often is that the hospital would rather not, but if they are not able to staff the ICU they will.

I am a ADN graduate and applied for a critical care intership. I was able to get right in and work in the medical icu. Best experience ever! At my hospital, I did let them know I was going back from my BSN. Everyone in the unit has their BSN or is working on it.

Try becoming a nurse tech/assistant in the ICU. You will gain a lot of experience. Our unit will try to hire our nurse techs first (when they apply to the intership) because of thier experience.

Hope this helps.

Hoozdo, ADN

Specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections. Has 15 years experience.

can an adn graduate get into an icu position right after graduating from an adn program, or do they have to work there way up.

I am an ADN new grad and was offered a job just today in the MICU/SICU. I did my preceptorship in the ICU and loved it. There will be a large learning curve, but I think I am up to the task.

I know, I know, people say you need med/surg experience first - but I figure if I can start where I want to be I am going to go for it!

Most large hospital's have ICU internships and are willing to take new grads of any level of registered nurse. This allows the facility to train you how they want you to be versus teaching "old dogs new tricks" so to speak. No offense to any meant. I am an "old dog" and am going back to the ICU after being gone for 6 years. My facility is putting me through a critical care course eventhough I have experience. As a new nurse, working an internship in an ICU is wonderful if you can get the position. Some facilities though, just working in the facility puts you ahead of other nurses applying because you are an empolyee already. Also, be honest with the recruiter and interview at as many hospitals that are around your area to find which one will give you a better internship. Also, if your school does not teach cardiac arrhythmias (some do not), take classes at the facility you are working while you are an intern. This makes you a little more marketable that you have a certificate showing you have completed these courses. Also seek out information on the cardiac drugs and drips your patients are on. Look them up in the drug book and seek to understand why that specific drug was ordered for the patient's specific problem. This will help you alot to already know your drugs. Good luck.

sabRN2b05, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Tele, ICU.

I have been a nurse since May 2005. I work on a BUSY medical/telemetry floor...a stepping stone for a lot of nurses. Our unit has high turnover due to the overwhelming stress...run around like a chicken with your head cut off for 12 hours. Pretty bad when new orientees ask "how long before I can transfer off this unit?" It just seems as though our acuity has doubled recently. We get everything from nursing home pts, CHF, COPD, strokes, chest pain, MI's, pneumonia/SOB, altered mental status (gotta love those!), transfers from ICU. Our pts have a medical MD, a cardiologist, a pulmonary MD, nephrology, urology, you name it. Can you imagine the orders we got thru in a 12 hour shift? The hospital's other cardiac unit (mostly CABG pts) and our Cardiac Obs unit have a 1:4 ratio with a FREE lead nurse and 1/3 the acuity we have!!!! Our lead nurse takes a full load!! It just seems like you can't keep caught up some days. I've seen seasoned nurses with the best time mgmt skills lose it!! Anyway, rant is over now...I could write you pages :rolleyes:

I am considering applying to the medical ICU at our hospital. I did my preceptorship there when I was in school and LOVED it!! I only applied to our Med/Tele unit after graduation because I was a tech on that floor during my last year of nursing school and it just seemed easier to stay around for a bit, you know? I love my boss and she's the best to work for, but I am so stressed out mentally and physically at the end of my day. It does not seem like we are ever going to get a 1:4 ratio (even though we have all fought for it!!) and something's gotta give. Our boss keeps wondering why we are losing nurses left and right (hmmm...let's think about this...)

What does everyone think about a newer nurse applying to ICU? I've heard from other ICU nurses at our hospital that the ICU orientation is like 6 months (with a veteran ICU nurse). I have learned so much in my 8 months on the floor and I strive to learn more. Our ICU nurses are awesome...great teamwork from that dept. I know they would take me under their wing and guide me, not let me sink or swim. Thanks in advance for feedback :)

HHW2006

Specializes in icu.

I am graduating in May with my ADN and will be starting in ICU. It will just depend on the hospital where you apply.

LilRedRN1973

Specializes in ICU, psych, corrections. Has 8 years experience.

I started in the ICU right out of school (ADN program), but I had worked there 1 1/2 years prior as an Apprentice Nurse so I had a lot of exposure to the unit. I had been assessing, charting, and providing total care (except giving meds) for 2 ICU patients for almost a year when I graduated this past June.

Melanie = )

hrtprncss

Specializes in ICUs, Tele, etc.. Has 15 years experience.

This is possible...I graduated 10 years ago with an ADN and now am finishing up my BS in Bio, go wherever you would like...Most ICU's will welcome you, I started in ICU when I graduated and have moved from different ICU's over the years...We've ALWAYS hired ADN grads, and welcome them...

sabRN2b05, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Tele, ICU.

This is possible...I graduated 10 years ago with an ADN and now am finishing up my BS in Bio, go wherever you would like...Most ICU's will welcome you, I started in ICU when I graduated and have moved from different ICU's over the years...We've ALWAYS hired ADN grads, and welcome them...

Thanks for the feedback. I spoke to the ICU Coordinator the other day and she told me they require one year experience (I will make my one year anniversary in May). She also told me that they would train me at least 90 days and longer if I requested (after the initial 90 days). She said they like to get "newer" nurses, so they "can train them right before they pick up too many bad habits from the floor" :lol2: I'm still debating between that and travel nursing (telemetry positions in New Orleans pay lucrative salaries!).

Your choice as to what to do, but if travel is your goal, get some ICU experience under your belt. It will make it much easier for you in the long run to get the better positions.

Many facilities want nurses that can work both areas, if they need to float someone.

I graduated with my ADN in December and was hired directly into the MICU along with about 20 other new grads. I work in a big university hospital but was also told that my community hospital would consider new grads as well. If you want to do it go for it!

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