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A little direction??

Posted

Hi, everyone. I have a few thoughts, a few questions, etc. I am mainly thinking out loud here and hoping that a few of you will chime in w/your opinions, advice, comments, etc.

Is there anyone on this board that somewhat recently (past 5 yrs or so) just sort of "fell into" nursing?

I am not positive nursing would be a good fit for me, as I am 1/2 introverted and 1/2 extroverted.

Every time I think about nursing, it fascinates me, but I am unsure if the sciences are where my bailiwick lies. I have completed all my prereq's for the nursing program, but I only made a B in both A & P classes, even though I worked my butt off. Not to sound arrogrant, but I am used to making A's and didn't like those B's (even though I was proud of the hardest B's I'd ever earned!)

I constantly come to AN to hear about the social interactions of nurses, as well as the procedures, descriptions of injuries, etc. I am always the first that volunteers for "picking" at a wound, or wanting to see the damage, etc in order to start helping to get it better, but poop and puke does kind of gross me out (though I think I would be able to numb myself to that aspect of the job??).

I won't lie, I AM interested in the better pay scale, though I'm not ignorant of the fact that nurses in some areas are having a really hard time right now finding positions/...

I have worked as a neurodiagnostic tech and as an EKG tech, but one of the things I do not like is the attitude of some health professionals with the Type A personalities...The kind that are constantly trying to act nonchalant about almost everything, to prove how much tougher emotionally they are, or to show off, etc. The kind that purposely act callous, insensitive, and use that infamous "dark humor" way too much...

I guess the introverted side of me, is the more "sensitive" side....How many other "sensitive" nurses are out there, making it just fine and still able to enjoy their job? BTW, not many can actually tell how "sensitive" I am because as I have been told, they see me as a leader and as a "take charge" kind of person....I'm not a very good "politically correct" type of person either, so that is a worry as well.

Coming around again to the beginning of my post, I constantly find myself coming back to the idea of nursing, the idea behind it, and the whole profession itself. I can't seem to let it go, but in order to find out if it's for me, I would have to make the commitment, spend the money, time, and effort to dive in and that really worries me!

Any thoughts??

nurse2033, MSN, RN

Specializes in ER, ICU.

Don't judge a profession on the stereotypes of the worst behavior. It is interesting and challenging work which attracts people who like that sort of thing, I'm one of them. Being arrogant in any field is a personal choice. There are so many areas to work in nursing you should be able to find your niche. Don't be turned off by the bad apples, there are many great people working in health care.

heartflutter, ADN, BSN

Specializes in Psychiatry, corrections, long-term care.. Has 3 years experience.

I have worked as a neurodiagnostic tech and as an EKG tech, but one of the things I do not like is the attitude of some health professionals with the Type A personalities...The kind that are constantly trying to act nonchalant about almost everything, to prove how much tougher emotionally they are, or to show off, etc. The kind that purposely act callous, insensitive, and use that infamous "dark humor" way too much...

A nurse that seems "nonchalant" and "uncaring" may actually be forcing themselves to keep calm and cool; especially in an emergency situation. Overreacting out of concern for a patient may cause the patient to stress further.

And I don't know where I'd be without some dark humor. I work in an LTC where 90% of the residents will die there. I'd rather have my humor be a little morbid, than lose it altogether and forget why I got into nursing in the first place.

SillyInScrubs

Specializes in Cardiology.

It sounds like a gift to me that you can be a sensitive person and still be seen as a leader to people around you! I am also a sensitive person, but it shows so much that I wonder if makes me seem "too soft". You sound like you have a good personality that would be a great fit for nursing!

Also, it would be great if for each person in the profession that seems to be giving it a bad name, we had a compassionate, "sensitive" one like you to cancel them out, until all anyone could see was compassionate, sensitive leaders. If you do choose to go on in nursing, your patients will know that you care, and that in and of itself is one of the best medicines. :)

Oh, and you get used to the poop and the puke.

lovingtheunloved, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, home health, critical care. Has 12 years experience.

Is there anyone on this board that somewhat recently (past 5 yrs or so) just sort of "fell into" nursing?

I just fell into nursing. Kind of a pathetic story actually. But found my calling on accident!

I just fell into nursing. Kind of a pathetic story actually. But found my calling on accident!

Please share your story?? The reason I asked if anyone has fallen into the profession is because I didn't dream of being a nurse as a child and it wasn't until recently that I was able to actually identify a profession that went with my interests and also it wasn't until relatively recently (past several years, again), that I seriously thought about nursing. I've never felt what some term a "passion" for nursing...It's been more of a fascination and what I would call a driving interest in the profession itself and the duties of the profession. And I STILL can't seem to truly put into words how/what drives my interest in nursing.....

Don't judge a profession on the stereotypes of the worst behavior. It is interesting and challenging work which attracts people who like that sort of thing, I'm one of them. Being arrogant in any field is a personal choice. There are so many areas to work in nursing you should be able to find your niche. Don't be turned off by the bad apples, there are many great people working in health care.

"Don't be turned off by the bad apples" I will strive to do that!

a nurse that seems "nonchalant" and "uncaring" may actually be forcing themselves to keep calm and cool; especially in an emergency situation. overreacting out of concern for a patient may cause the patient to stress further.

actually, i was more referring to the way in which the "can't be ruffled, or i've seen it all" behavior and attitude is towards coworkers....

and i don't know where i'd be without some dark humor. i work in an ltc where 90% of the residents will die there. i'd rather have my humor be a little morbid, than lose it altogether and forget why i got into nursing in the first place.

i agree...dark humor is great for me, as is extremely sardonic/dry humor...i was talking about the people that spend way too much time and go overboard in their callousness....

Ayvah, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Specialty. Has 10 years experience.

I'm one of those introverted nurses, and I feel like nursing has helped me come out of my shell a little - it is a challenge at times but I think its a good one that has helped me grow. Sometimes its good to step out of your comfort zone a little.

I think if you find your passion you should go with it. You said nursing fascinates you - it does for me too and that is a big part of what keeps me going.

(and not to worry, you'll get used to the bodily fluids part of it too)

it sounds like a gift to me that you can be a sensitive person and still be seen as a leader to people around you! i am also a sensitive person, but it shows so much that i wonder if makes me seem "too soft". so your saying should be "don't mistake my kindness for weakness!" :)

you sound like you have a good personality that would be a great fit for nursing!

i'm really glad to hear that....

also, it would be great if for each person in the profession that seems to be giving it a bad name, we had a compassionate, "sensitive" one like you to cancel them out, until all anyone could see was compassionate, sensitive leaders. if you do choose to go on in nursing, your patients will know that you care, and that in and of itself is one of the best medicines. :)

oh, and you get used to the poop and the puke. man, i hope so.....i have been doing rounds at the local ltc with my dog and the lady in the next bed had to be changed...i was on the other side of the room and it seemed really bad to me when the cna came in to take care of her...i'm really hoping i can gut it out....i'm a big animal person and can handle poop and puke with animals, so maybe it'll just take time and experience?!?!

ty for the reply.

I'm one of those introverted nurses, and I feel like nursing has helped me come out of my shell a little - it is a challenge at times but I think its a good one that has helped me grow. Sometimes its good to step out of your comfort zone a little.

I think if you find your passion you should go with it. You said nursing fascinates you - it does for me too and that is a big part of what keeps me going.

(and not to worry, you'll get used to the bodily fluids part of it too)

Thanks, Ayvah. How has it changed things for you? Could you possibly tell of something that has changed about you, since starting nursing?

Ayvah, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Specialty. Has 10 years experience.

Thanks, Ayvah. How has it changed things for you? Could you possibly tell of something that has changed about you, since starting nursing?

After seeing many life changing situations that patients have gone through - new diagnoses, death of a loved one, death of someone young, complications after surgeries, the suffering of those with a mental illness, helping someone learn to walk again, new pregnancy, etc, and helping them get through it all, it really helps to put life and priorities into perspective and made me grateful for all that I have. It brings to light how fortunate we are to have the things we easily take for granted - most especially our family and our health. You see incredible strength these patients have, and drawing on that experience has helped me get my family through some traumatic health issues of our own in the last few years. I think I'm more empathetic and open, more conversational/less shy, and more supportive of others, less judgmental, and a stronger person. You see some of the best and some of the worst that life has to offer - it truly is both ends of the spectrum that you will see. I learn just as much from the patients as they do from me. Its quite a journey ;)

However do be aware nursing has a dirty side (besides the poo/vomit!), most especially poor (and at times unsafe or illegal) working conditions in hospitals and long term care facilities. Unfortunately this is very common in these locations. It really is a love-hate job, but if it is your passion I'd say go for it - you'll find a job which works for you.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

I fell into nursing ... I was a graphic designer/desktop publisher/middle management for a government consulting firm's publications department. Became an EMT-Basic just for something to do (always had been interested in EMS), loved it so much I stayed in school and earned another degree and my Paramedic cert. Volunteered as a medic in my community (and still do). Fast-forward a couple of years ... I was doing my usual grueling commute when I hit a BIG deer on the highway (six-point buck, yikes!), and knew that I had to make a change ... I couldn't keep driving 500+ miles each week, and I was miserable and bored in my career. I decided to use my medic skills for employment, took a big pay cut (like 50%), and went to work as an ER tech. Cut my commute by 65%, increased my job happiness by 200%. :) Decided to go back to school for nursing, and here I am! Sometimes things just work out.

I fell into nursing ... I was a graphic designer/desktop publisher/middle management for a government consulting firm's publications department. Became an EMT-Basic just for something to do (always had been interested in EMS), loved it so much I stayed in school and earned another degree and my Paramedic cert. Volunteered as a medic in my community (and still do). Fast-forward a couple of years ... I was doing my usual grueling commute when I hit a BIG deer on the highway (six-point buck, yikes!), and knew that I had to make a change ... I couldn't keep driving 500+ miles each week, and I was miserable and bored in my career. I decided to use my medic skills for employment, took a big pay cut (like 50%), and went to work as an ER tech. Cut my commute by 65%, increased my job happiness by 200%. :) Decided to go back to school for nursing, and here I am! Sometimes things just work out.

Thanks for the reply, Lunah. I'm glad to hear some of the stories you guys have posted.