I am 24 days into WGU's RN-MSN program and I love it, I am 24 days into WGU's RN-MSN program and I love it, - pg.4 | allnurses

I am 24 days into WGU's RN-MSN program and I love it, - page 4

and here's what I have done/learned. I have finished THREE classes and have 9 competency units/credits in 3 weeks! If you have prior experience/knowledge you can fly through. Some classes have... Read More

  1. Visit  futureeastcoastNP profile page
    #39 0
    Quote from skoolrn
    and here's what I have done/learned. I have finished THREE classes and have 9 competency units/credits in 3 weeks! If you have prior experience/knowledge you can fly through. Some classes have "outside vendor" components to the WGU course and they aren't always compatible with whatever computer OS or browser you have. For example, my statistics lab doesn't work on my mac but does on my PC. You need to be aware of this!! Luckily I have 2 laptops and can switch when I need to. MY mentor is awesome!! You really want someone to whine to. The course mentors are awesome!! They know the course material and can answer questions. I recently finished the course called Health Assessment and the assessment for this course is the NLN Health assessment test. I've been a nurse for 22 yrs and have a BS in biology. This is a tough class. There was info in that course that I feel was geared for a nurse practitioner, things I was never taught, never heard of, and would never do in nursing practice unless I were a NP. So this course as a BSN level course is going to be very hard for nurses with an ADN and little experience. I relayed this to my mentor and said that WGU could contact me and I would happily give examples. My next course is statistics, then community and population health. I should finish the BSN component and receive my BSN in less then 6 months. Then onto the MSN courses. Feel free to ask questions if you are on the fence about WGU!
    Omg, you finished 3 classes in 3 weeks?

    The future of nursing looks very grim, folks. Where are the standards?
  2. Visit  featherzRN profile page
    #40 0
    Quote from futureeastcoastNP
    Omg, you finished 3 classes in 3 weeks?

    The future of nursing looks very grim, folks. Where are the standards?
    Heh, if you think that's bad don't ask me how many classes I finished in 14 weeks. =) WGU is competency based, so it can be very quick if you know or can learn the material. Most people do NOT graduate in 14 weeks - the average appears to be 10-18 months.

    Stars19 - this is an old thread.. which community health class are you speaking of? MSN or BSN? Class code? Most WGU 'extra stuff' (concept maps, etc) would be optional if needed to learn the material. Classes that have tests with them have a pre and a post test.
  3. Visit  futureeastcoastNP profile page
    #41 0
    Quote from featherzRN
    Heh, if you think that's bad don't ask me how many classes I finished in 14 weeks. =) WGU is competency based, so it can be very quick if you know or can learn the material. Most people do NOT graduate in 14 weeks - the average appears to be 10-18 months.

    Stars19 - this is an old thread.. which community health class are you speaking of? MSN or BSN? Class code? Most WGU 'extra stuff' (concept maps, etc) would be optional if needed to learn the material. Classes that have tests with them have a pre and a post test.
    They don't grant competency based FNP-MSN degrees do they?

    Once that happens this profession is clearly a joke.
  4. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    #42 0
    If you have to get a BSN along the way, how is it an RN to MSN program?
    Other RN to MSN programs o have looked do not involve getting a BSN between ADN and MSN.
  5. Visit  nursejoy1 profile page
    #43 1
    From other threads I have read you do not have to get your BSN, but can choose to be awarded BSN while working toward your MSN.
  6. Visit  chanib143 profile page
    #44 0
    Hello, I was wondering what kind of work load do you have? is it mostly writing papers or homework per class?
  7. Visit  benegesserit profile page
    #45 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    If you have to get a BSN along the way, how is it an RN to MSN program?
    Other RN to MSN programs o have looked do not involve getting a BSN between ADN and MSN.
    I'm not sure what the problem is? ADN to MSN programs inherently include the BSN content as part of the program, whether or not they award some sort of degree/certificate once the BSN content is finished. Most people consider the ability to get BSN recognition along the way a benefit for employment purposes - being able to show your employer that you have the Ever So Important BSN a year or so sooner.

    At WGU there are a number of classes that have both BSN and MSN versions, with the MSN version being more complex. In the RN to MSN program, you take the MSN version of the class. If you did RN to BSN and then MSN, you'd take both the the BSN and MSN version of the same class. So RN to MSN just streamlines things and avoids duplication of effort.
    Last edit by benegesserit on May 16 : Reason: Coming off of night shift, not thinking straight...
  8. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    #46 0
    I'm not sure what the problem is? ADN to MSN programs inherently include the BSN content as part of the program, whether or not they award some sort of degree/certificate once the BSN content is finished.
    Well nobody has yet said it was a problem so not sure what you are talking about. My question was one of labeling really.
    The RN to MSN programs I have looked at (I define that as not including a BSN) are significantly few credit hours than the RN to BSN to MSN programs I have seen.
    They also don't seem concerned with what classes were taken to earn the associates degree. Where as BSN programs all want me to finish a lot of credits before I am allowed to enter an RN to BSN program, the MSN programs will allow a qualified ADN RN to enter the program directly.

    Most people consider the ability to get BSN recognition along the way a benefit for employment purposes - being able to show your employer that you have the Ever So Important BSN a year or so sooner.
    I have no idea why anyone would consider a BSN a benefit over an MSN.

    At WGU there are a number of classes that have both BSN and MSN versions, with the MSN version being more complex. In the RN to MSN program, you take the MSN version of the class. If you did RN to BSN and then MSN, you'd take both the the BSN and MSN version of the same class. So RN to MSN just streamlines things and avoids duplication of effort
    So how many credits does this approach save as compared to separately obtaining a BSN then going on to MSN? Other school RN to BSN to MSN programs typically save 6 to 9 credits only.
  9. Visit  benegesserit profile page
    #47 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Well nobody has yet said it was a problem so not sure what you are talking about. My question was one of labeling really.
    The RN to MSN programs I have looked at (I define that as not including a BSN) are significantly few credit hours than the RN to BSN to MSN programs I have seen.
    They also don't seem concerned with what classes were taken to earn the associates degree. Where as BSN programs all want me to finish a lot of credits before I am allowed to enter an RN to BSN program, the MSN programs will allow a qualified ADN RN to enter the program directly.
    You're right, it's a matter of phrasing.

    I don't believe WGU's program is significantly different, content-wise, than any other RN-to-MSN program (in the same specialties). It's not some sort of strange RN to BSN to MSN program. They simply offer, as a courtesy, the ability to get a BSN certificate after finishing the portion of the content that overlaps with the BSN program for those who find it helpful career-wise or personally fulfilling or whatever.

    I would like to see a link to an RN to MSN program that does not include the BSN content in some form or another as part of the MSN curriculum.

    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I have no idea why anyone would consider a BSN a benefit over an MSN.
    Ok, let's say you're trying to get a job that requires at least a BSN, or you get a raise for having a BSN. Assuming no extra work is required, is it better to get the BSN recognition partway through the program, after finishing the BSN content? Or is it better to have to wait until you've finished the entire program and have the MSN?

    I can't think of many people who wouldn't want the raise sooner.

    It's not that the BSN is *better* - it's that you're doing that content regardless, and able to get recognition for it faster.

    Quote from PMFB-RN
    So how many credits does this approach save as compared to separately obtaining a BSN then going on to MSN? Other school RN to BSN to MSN programs typically save 6 to 9 credits only.
    WGU RN to BSN is 120 units. WGU RN to MSN is 147 units. WGU BSN to MSN is 36 units.

    So going RN to MSN at WGU saves 9 units, about the same as you've seen elsewhere.

    RN to MSN does not skip any classes that are included in the BSN program. There are a handful of classes with a BSN version and a more advanced MSN version. People in the RN to MSN program take the MSN version, while someone doing BSN and then MSN would have to take both the BSN and MSN version of the class. And that's why it's a shorter path - no content is eliminated, just streamlined.

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