salary--dfw - page 6

Hi I was wondering if anyone knew the starting or average salary of an RN in the DFW area?... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from SMK1
    About what could on expect to pay in property taxes in a good neighborhood on a 150k house in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area?
    Each city, town, and suburb has its own tax rate. On $150,000 house, you can expect to pay anywhere from $2,800 to $4,500 yearly, since some cities have cheaper tax rates than others. Typically, homes that are located in good school districts tend to have heftier property tax bills.

    For example, Keller is a booming suburb located in the northeast Fort Worth area. When I was house-hunting 2 years ago, I was looking into buying a $120,000 house that was located in the Keller Independent School District. Since the Keller ISD has a stellar reputation, the property taxes on this $120,000 house were projected to be $3,850 yearly.

    I settled on a house that was located in the Crowley ISD. I live in southwest Fort Worth near the Crowley city limits, and the school district around here has a good reputation. Last year's property taxes were $2,900. While I don't have kids, it is important to be located in a "good" school district, because that's a major selling point of a house.
  2. by   smk1
    OK, thanks. The taxes are a bit spendy, but I pay 3000/year on my house which I bought for 184k in WA. So this is not going to be a shock to me.
  3. by   mymomisanurse
    property taxes differ according to where you live. I do know that Keller was very expensive around 3% I think. I've been house hunting for about a year and have seen yearly property taxes as much as $9000/yr. We were considering cedar hill near joe pool lake but that area is also very expensive. The more expensive house you have the higher your property taxes are going to be. So take that into consideration also. You might want to look into areas that are not within the city limits. They tend to have a lower tax rate and no city water bills. We chose to live in Burleson and it has a great school district, is close to our family, many lakes and fort worth.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from TheCommuter
    California pays their nurses significantly more but, unless the nurse lives in a sorry Central Valley town amid the cow dung, the supposedly "good money" and "big paychecks" are typically eroded by the expensive cost of living in that state.
    Good Grief! It's not that bad ... LOL.

    As I recall, you sold your house in Bakersfield for a nice profit and paid cash for your Texas house ... which is great but ... let's not forget that California's increased cost of living was probably a tremendous benefit for you.

    Yep, Texas is cheap but, that also means your house doesn't appreciate much either so it's a double edged sword.

    As for us Cali nurses who are living amid cow dung ... I live in the desert and it doesn't smell bad out here.

    I paid $150K for my house. It's not worth $300K anymore ... actually houses are getting down to the mid to low '200s now ... I suspect it's probably the same over in Bakersfield since both markets have tracked about the same.

    When you run those cost of living calculators, the difference is about 20 percent compared with Texas cities like Dallas and Houston ... even with the higher housing prices.

    BUT ... how much money am I making? $43 an hour. In three years it gets up to $48, with benefits.

    How much would I have to make in Texas to maintain the same standard of living? About $70-80K and, obviously that's never gonna happen ... at least any time soon.

    So ... I guess the cost of living factor depends on how you play it. Personally ... I'd rather lock in a cheap mortgage and go for higher wages and house appreciation. Because the current real estate market notwithstanding ... you probably benefit more financially in the long run.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Sep 27, '07
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Actually, studies have proven that Texas ranks #1 in the nation for RN wages after cost-of-living adjustments have been made.
    If you want to live on or near the coast that's true but, that's not where the boom market for nurses is in California anymore ... those studies only focused on San Francisco, LA, San Diego, etc.

    The boom market is in the inland areas. And now that inland houses are getting significantly cheaper ... there's much better money to be made. Hospitals are expanding like crazy because the population is booming out there and you can make coastal wages without the higher cost of living.

    As for those areas being "less desirable" ... I lived in Texas ... it's pretty much the same ... sprawling suburb either way.

    So to me at least ... the difference pretty much boils down to how much money you can make and ... California definitely pays better.
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Sep 27, '07
  6. by   loricatus
    Quote from Sheri257
    Good Grief! It's not that bad ... LOL.

    As I recall, you sold your house in Bakersfield for a nice profit and paid cash for your Texas house ... which is great but ... let's not forget that California's increased cost of living was probably a tremendous benefit for you.

    Yep, Texas is cheap but, that also means your house doesn't appreciate much either so it's a double edged sword.

    As for us Cali nurses who are living amid cow dung ... I live in the desert and it doesn't smell bad out here.

    I paid $150K for my house. It's not worth $300K anymore ... actually houses are getting down to the mid to low '200s now ... I suspect it's probably the same over in Bakersfield since both markets have tracked about the same.

    When you run those cost of living calculators, the difference is about 20 percent compared with Texas cities like Dallas and Houston ... even with the higher housing prices.

    BUT ... how much money am I making? $43 an hour. In three years it gets up to $48.

    How much would I have to make in Texas to maintain the same standard of living? About $70-80K and, obviously that's never gonna happen ... at least any time soon.

    So ... I guess the cost of living factor depends on how you play it. Personally ... I'd rather lock in a cheap mortgage and go for higher wages and house appreciation. Because the current real estate market notwithstanding ... you probably benefit more finanically in the long run.
    I agree with you. I lived in Texas and knew it was time to leave after having to pay a $500.00 electric bill for a particularly hot month (100 degrees plus most of the month). Now, if the argument to this is going to be that the winters are less expensive, I beg to differ. My gas heat bill during November through March averaged $150.00 per month, while my electric was around $95.00. I paid no more than $200.00 for gas heat this past winter in LI and my electric bill averaged $40.00 per month. I rarely have to use the a/c and actually get to breath ocean air because I can leave my windows open most of the summer. I am still able to pay the mortgage on an empty house in Texas, while renting a house in Long Island with my increased wages here. BTW, Long Island is comparable in cost of living to much of CA. Although the cost of housing is lower in TX, the cost of all other living is pretty much comparable to here; and, the wages in Texas certainly do not refect that. Actual cost for utilities were higher because the climate mandates constant use of a/c from April to October (sorry, I can't stand the heat and need it at least 75 degrees to be able to function-I don't consider it leaving beyond my means to ask that I avoid sweating). Gas utilities, cable, & phone are more expensive than here. The gasoline prices are a bit less; but, I do not have to put on the mileage I did while I was in Texas, so the actual cost for it is a lot less. With the wages I received in Texas, I could not even afford a new car and still pay for all the necessities of a lower middle class life.

    I truly believe that they cook the books there when it comes to cost of living calculations. For instance, what was advertised as the cost per kilowatt hour really wasn't. They do not add in the calculations all the fees that are on top of that kilowatt hour-anyone there, divide your payment amount by the amount of kilowatt hours used and you will see that you are paying a lot more than rate that is provided as their cost to consumers. Another thing, I now pay $25.00 every 3 months for my water bill-I used to pay $50.00 per month for it in Texas. So, when they say that the cost of living being less justifies the low wages, I cannot agree because the proportionate real cost of living versus the real wages puts nursing in the unskilled manual labor category.
  7. by   smk1
    The best deal I have seen from any nurse that I know is an RN with 1 year of CCU experience and is making 45/hour in NYC and rents a nice house on Staten Island for 1500/month (4 bed 2 bath nice yard and schools). No property tax, signed a long term lease and while she has no plans to ever buy a home, she chucks away almost 2 grand/month in savings without being married... and she gets all of the fun of NYC and the travel deals, food, culture etc...
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from loricatus
    I truly believe that they cook the books there when it comes to cost of living calculations.
    I don't think they're cooking the books. I just don't think they're looking at the entire picture.

    Everybody loves to point out California housing prices and say ... you see! Texas nurses are doing better! But not everybody pays $300K to $500K for a house. You can't just count the losers in the marketplace and say, "I'm doing better!"

    You also have to look at the winners ... (like The Commuter) who sold their houses for a nice chunk of cash. Or, the nurses who bought houses cheap, still have a cheap mortgages but are sitting on a ton of home equity. Or, the nurses who pay minimal rent (like the above mentioned Staten Island example) and still bring home lots of cash with higher wages.

    If you added home sale income, home equity, and rent versus income differentials to those analyses ... you'd probably get a completely different picture. But, instead, they tend to focus on people who paid too much for houses.

    IMO, you don't want the cost of living to get too high but, at the same time ... you don't want the cost of living to get too low either. This may sound crazy in our "cheap at all costs" culture but ... what you end up with is stagnant wages that don't even keep pace with inflation.

    This Texas A&M report says that Texas wages, overall, increased by only 1 percent a year from 2001 to 2006. Since inflation is typically more than 3 percent a year ... cheap isn't helping much in that scenario ... you're actually losing money.

    http://recenter.tamu.edu:80/tgrande/vol13-2/1773.html

    Hopefully, Texas nurses are doing better than 1 percent a year and wages are at least keeping up with inflation but, since they're making $2K less per year on average than nurses nationwide ... that's not an encouraging sign either.

    In the end, you really have to wonder ... how does a major city like Dallas end up paying nurses only $20-23 an hour?

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Sep 27, '07
  9. by   mymomisanurse
    Yes I have talked with a few nurses that have transferred from the california coast and they said that they make more money living in the central valley than on the coast. go figure.... you would think the opposite. I've seen this place grow and now you can almost find anything you need in Fresno. all the big name expensive stores are there now. There are plenty of good school districts and lots of people love the small communities, meaning around 50,0000- 100,000 people in a town. yes the coastal towns are beautiful and the weather's great but what's the point if you can't afford to take a day off and enjoy the area where you live!!!! I'd rather get a whiff of cow dung occasionally, live in a beautiful house of my own without roommates, and make lots of money. Besides I can always drive to the coast.
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from mymomisanurse
    Yes I have talked with a few nurses that have transferred from the california coast and they said that they make more money living in the central valley than on the coast. go figure.... you would think the opposite.

    I'd rather get a whiff of cow dung occasionally, live in a beautiful house of my own without roommates, and make lots of money. Besides I can always drive to the coast.
    I agree. I think the reason coastal wages haven't gone up as much as perhaps they should have is because nurses have oversaturated those areas. After the ratio law was passed, thousands of nurses moved here from out of state but ...

    Where did they move to? The coast. So they've actually got an over supply in some markets. If you've got enough nurses then, hospitals are going to be less inclined to raise the pay.

    That combined with the fact that the population growth is heading inland has created a situation where the inland areas actually pay better. While the coastal population is expected to grow by 20 percent, inland area population is going to increase by more than triple that amount ... 70 percent.

    Just about all of the hospitals in my area are expanding, increasing demand for nursing positions. That's why I think the inland areas are starting to pay better than the coast. And now that houses are getting cheaper ... you can really make bank.

    So ... bring on the cow dung because, I don't think the cow dung is going to be around for long.

  11. by   mymomisanurse
    Quote from Sheri257
    I don't think they're cooking the books. I just don't think they're looking at the entire picture.

    Everybody loves to point out California housing prices and say ... you see! Texas nurses are doing better! But not everybody pays $300K to $500K for a house. You can't just count the losers in the marketplace and say, "I'm doing better!"

    You also have to look at the winners ... (like The Commuter) who sold their houses for a nice chunk of cash. Or, the nurses who bought houses cheap, still have a cheap mortgages but are sitting on a ton of home equity. Or, the nurses who pay minimal rent (like the above mentioned Staten Island example) and still bring home lots of cash with higher wages.

    If you added home sale income, home equity, and rent versus income differentials to those analyses ... you'd probably get a completely different picture. But, instead, they tend to focus on people who paid too much for houses.

    IMO, you don't want the cost of living to get too high but, at the same time ... you don't want the cost of living to get too low either. This may sound crazy in our "cheap at all costs" culture but ... what you end up with is stagnant wages that don't even keep pace with inflation.

    This Texas A&M report says that Texas wages, overall, increased by only 1 percent a year from 2001 to 2006. Since inflation is typically more than 3 percent a year ... cheap isn't helping much in that scenario ... you're actually losing money.

    http://recenter.tamu.edu:80/tgrande/vol13-2/1773.html

    Hopefully, Texas nurses are doing better than 1 percent a year and wages are at least keeping up with inflation but, since they're making $2K less per year on average than nurses nationwide ... that's not an encouraging sign either.

    In the end, you really have to wonder ... how does a major city like Dallas end up paying nurses only $20-23 an hour?

    I agree. I am one of those nurse that bought a house here in cali for cheap $125,000 and only pay a mortgage of $950/month. I now work as a perdiem nurse for $46/hr and can choose to work only 4 days per pay period If I want too. I'm still getting a very good deal here. Now that we are moving to Texas that's all going to change. I knew they were being paid less but did not expect such a low wage. $23.50 for an RN with 2 1/2 yrs experience. come on now. That a real joke. I hope the pay will soon raise because they are building lots of $300k houses around my neighborhood
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from mymomisanurse
    I agree. I am one of those nurse that bought a house here in cali for cheap $125,000 and only pay a mortgage of $950/month. I now work as a perdiem nurse for $46/hr and can choose to work only 4 days per pay period If I want too. I'm still getting a very good deal here. Now that we are moving to Texas that's all going to change. I knew they were being paid less but did not expect such a low wage. $23.50 for an RN with 2 1/2 yrs experience. come on now. That a real joke. I hope the pay will soon raise because they are building lots of $300k houses around my neighborhood
    Well ... Dallas also has a peculiar problem, which is Group One. There's lots of threads about it posted on this board that you may want to check out.

    There's over 100 Dallas area hospitals that belong to Group One and, they use the Fair Credit Reporting Act to compile a database and share information about employees. It's very controversial because any manager who doesn't like you for whatever reason can put your name in this database and potentially prevent you from being hired elsewhere.

    Some nurses have said that they've been successful in removing detrimental information about their job history from this database but, apparently it's a big hassle. You basically have to file paper work to do this, much like you'd have to file paperwork to remove false information on your credit report.

    Maybe I'm too cynical but, since over 100 Dallas area hospitals have an association where they're sharing employee information in a database ... I wouldn't be surprized if they're working together in a similar effort to keep wages low as well.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Sep 28, '07
  13. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Sheri257
    Well ... Dallas also has a peculiar problem, which is Group One. There's lots of threads about it posted on this board that you may want to check out.

    ....

    Maybe I'm too cynical but, since over 100 Dallas area hospitals have an association where they're sharing employee information in a database ... I wouldn't be surprized if they're working together in a similar effort to keep wages low as well.

    They are and they do... the DFW Hospital council

    That's all I'm gonna say on that matter.

    Even with all I've been through, I still love DFW!

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