Do I really want to become a CRNA? - page 3

I'm a 26 year old male and taking all of the prerequisites for nursing school, and doing very well in the classes: AP, Microbiology and Chemistry - and they interest me more than most things have in... Read More

  1. by   PostOpPrincess
    I won't become one just for the money, but I appreciate the autonomy and higher-level of thinking involved.
  2. by   CheeseLover24
    I just graduated with my BSN and I am now 29 years old. I spent A LOT of time thinking about what I wanted to do for my career. I had a previous degree in liberal arts--I thought about going back to school for a MBA, accountant, nursing, a million different things. I told myself--ok I'll take the CNA class and if I totally hate it, then I'll at least have an inkling that nursing isn't the right direction for me. But I did like the CNA class. Then I started volunteering at a local hospital and that gave me even more evidence. My next steps were to take classes at our local community college since I had never taken A&P, chemistry, etc. I found that I did really well in those classes and thought they were interesting. You can kind of ease your way into these things and not have to make a big decision right away and go from no experience in healthcare at all to being a CRNA. There is a big gap between the two and a lot will happen along the way that may or may not change your mind. Now that I am done with my BSN I am still unsure what I ultimately want to do with nursing....but I start my ICU job next month!
  3. by   Kellacan
    I feel that prestige plays an enormous role in the work that we do every day. There are many individuals that spent countless hours in school--i.e., physicians, nurse practioners, CRNAs, etc. and they deserve the respect they receive. These folks are not your run-of-the-mill LPNs or two-year RNs. People recognize this and the prestige is only one of the many rewards for being at the top of your profession. And, this is not a form of hubris since those who work hard at what they do are typically rewarded, and their patients are rewarded as well for being under the care of a committed, educated practitioner.

    In my opinion, this is a bit offensive to the Nursing profession. Masters degree or not, you are a Nurse. I don't see why you would refer to a Nurse as "run of the mill" simply because they are not CRNA's- this is after all the profession you are in. I don't want you to think I that I don't know that becoming a CRNA is not a great accomplishment because it definitely is, but in my opinion, so is making it to the position of an RN, which is where you started. After you spent all that time to become an RN, someone said to you "you're just run of the mill" I would think that would be infuriating because you did spent countless hours to get there. You also put yourslef in the same rank as a physician- sorry, but not the same.
  4. by   jenrn2008
    wow heated discussion... to rich for my blood LOL
  5. by   markuskristian
    Quote from SueBee RN-BSN
    My career is not as a CRNA as of yet, but I can tell you they don't abandon nursing. While the nursing process is always used, CRNA's must continue their education, and leadership for the life of their career's. MDA's do not. Having worked with MDA's and Crna's, I must say the nurses are better providers of anesthesia. Better from pre-op assessment, quick in the OR when complications happen, and very professional in the PACU. I can't say the same for the MDA's. Nurses pride themselves on excellent work, and really desire good patient outcomes.
    Quite a harsh commentary there.

    OP, I'm right where you're at. I'm a pre-nursing student using nursing school as a stepping stone to nurse anesthesia. I can tell you the main reason I'm going for it is a fascination with the way anesthesia works... it was either MD anesthesia or nurse anesthesia for me.
  6. by   aCRNAhopeful
    I can tell you I got into nursing for the purposes of becoming a CRNA but the more I progressed through school, prereqs and then RN-ADN, I became more and more happy with the route I'm taking to get there. Im currently an RN working in critical care and I love it so far. I could be happy doing this work as a career but I still find myself wanting more in terms of hard scientific knowledge. So I'm doing my RN-BSN now and slowly knocking out my anesthesia prereqs and should have at least 3 years experience by the time I apply. I had all the same original fears that you do. I didn't see myself as some caring sensitive male as I stereotypically believed all nurses had to be But it turns out I do care deeply for the wellbeing of my patients and their familes and that I am right for this profession after all. Everything up until this point has gone great for me and if you have a strong fascination with science and its application to patients then I think nurse ansesthesia could be a great fit for you as well.
  7. by   gvgodglry
    Hello,
    I am currently in school for my RN and already have most of my prereqs done for my BSN. I am wanting to take my CRNA at UC. The Dr I currently work for encouraged me to do it as well. According to him I could work at a surgery center mon-friday 8-5 and make 150,000 easy and around 5000 a weekend on call. I understand about working over when things run behind. I used to work long term care and rarely got out on time. Usually at least an hour over each night. I would like to know what I can study ahead of time to have me at the top of my skills as far as entrance exams, info and in order to practice. Like normals in vitals, tidal volumes? Anything you think would be helpful. I want to know anything that will help me practice safely like the back of my hand ya know? I was thinking the CNS and PNS for spinals? Will I need to memorize specific drugs, dosing side effects ect. I would love to work on those ahead of time cause I love science and seem to do really well in the science bio area but pharmacology bored me as an LPN. Any advice you have would be great. Also anything you know about CRNA heading their own practices. Thanks :-)
  8. by   AbeFrohman
    All that and 100x more. Don't even think about what to study for CRNA school until after accepted. Just study hard when you go over critical care in nursing school and you'll get a good foundation.

    Who the heck makes 5000 in a weekend. This is a large stretch. Also wouldn't expect to make 150000 starting out. Possible, but wouldn't get your hopes up.
  9. by   gvgodglry
    What do you think a ballpark starting range is?
  10. by   FNP2B1
    Depends where you live in the US. In Miami/Ft Lauderdale, Sheridan....a big provider of anesthesia services starts fresh grads off at $130k. This will likely go down in the near future as more AAs are being pumped out of the local universities and saturating the market. New grads in the Atlanta, GA area are starting out at $95k to $100k. They have already felt the effect of a flood of AAs saturating the market. You can always check out GasWork.com - The Largest and Most Comprehensive Anesthesia Employment Resource Since 1996 to check on jobs and pay rates for CRNAs in your local area. Make sure you read the ads carefully though....many of those high paying jobs want a couple of years of experience. They also want you to be totally INDEPENDENT and able to insert A lines, CVLs and be able to perform peripheral nerve blocks.
  11. by   Allysun
    I want to be a CRNA but i first want to finish nursing school.....
  12. by   manusko
    Quote from FNP2B1
    Depends where you live in the US. In Miami/Ft Lauderdale, Sheridan....a big provider of anesthesia services starts fresh grads off at $130k. This will likely go down in the near future as more AAs are being pumped out of the local universities and saturating the market. New grads in the Atlanta, GA area are starting out at $95k to $100k. They have already felt the effect of a flood of AAs saturating the market. You can always check out GasWork.com - The Largest and Most Comprehensive Anesthesia Employment Resource Since 1996 to check on jobs and pay rates for CRNAs in your local area. Make sure you read the ads carefully though....many of those high paying jobs want a couple of years of experience. They also want you to be totally INDEPENDENT and able to insert A lines, CVLs and be able to perform peripheral nerve blocks.
    It depends on location. Some places can be on the lower end of 100K and there are some that are closer to 300K. It all depends on where you want to live and if you like being paid on a W-2 or 1099 system.

    Also, AAs may flood the market in the states where they are allowed to practice, but the majority of the country does not have them.

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