Where am I competitive?

  1. 0
    Can't seem to get anyone to reply in the other forum, so I will ask here. I know all schools vary, and I'm in particular looking at the University of Utah Primary Care DNP.

    25 yo white male
    BSN - Magna Cum Laude
    cGPA 3.6
    Last 60 credit GPA 3.82
    2 years ER in rural hospital
    2 years in large hospital on cardiac/stepdown unit

    Volunteer as little league coach
    Volunteer for organ donation
    Volunteer at Jr. High for career day
    LPN school vice president

    Anyone know if this is considered competitive for out at the University of Utah? Where do my stats look competitive for?
  2. 11 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    right like you know they do, perfect
  4. 0
    Quote from kacsper
    right like you know they do, perfect
    What?
  5. 1
    I'm not sure if you are trying to show off but to be blunt, duh. You are competitive. Everywhere. You are male, you have a very good GPA and work experience....need I say more? You're golden.
    questioningRN likes this.
  6. 0
    TY Princess!
    Listen, you know you are walking on water... so chill, did you apply? Id worry if you had a 1.6, incase you have not noticed we are in a healthcare crisis... NP's are necessary if somehow this country will survive- why the DNP is, is stupid. You hit on several things that they are looking for. Based on your experience and volunteer, perceived personality, I would tell you to wait until the Emergency Nurse Practitioner takes off, right now its a combo of FNP and ACNP, but the ANCC anounced the new ENP, and that is where I think you are gonna be most happy, Primary Care is going to bore you (again based on what you wrote.)
    I worked in the SICU for years, hated Psych, never even considered OBGYN.... Now I am working as a Assisted Reproductive/Infertility Coordinator and my job is basically psch and obgyn- and Im a guy, 34, Ashkenazi decent, biracial (well more like 25%) and I live in a rural state that doesnt even have a DNP program to apply to... I completed two semesters for my MSN and withdrew to think more about specialtys for me its either Family Psych or Womans Health/Midwife dual... if you have a BS, your 25 and you have already worked ER and Stepdown for 4 years, you must be a genius bc having taken some time to expore specialties, I have worked with new and old nurses, and the best advice I have been given is do not settle on what you think you should do, specialize in what you love to do... HUGE investment BSN-DNP time, money energy, your life etc.... I dont know you but you sound like an acute care action area kinda nurse, just something to think about. It would stink if you spent all the time and money to obtain a DNP and then you owe more in student loans than your earn, or you realize it's tooo quiet in primary care- again, I dont know you from the next guy, from one guy to another, im glad I took the time to think about my direction, because otherwise id be one of the FNP/ACNP graduates I recommended to you, and would be miserable. YOu want to be happy, right- ? I think you would do well as a PA, and thats only two years... and your scope is very broad... just a thought.

    Quote from hik9258
    Can't seem to get anyone to reply in the other forum, so I will ask here. I know all schools vary, and I'm in particular looking at the University of Utah Primary Care DNP.

    25 yo white male
    BSN - Magna Cum Laude
    cGPA 3.6
    Last 60 credit GPA 3.82
    2 years ER in rural hospital
    2 years in large hospital on cardiac/stepdown unit

    Volunteer as little league coach
    Volunteer for organ donation
    Volunteer at Jr. High for career day
    LPN school vice president

    Anyone know if this is considered competitive for out at the University of Utah? Where do my stats look competitive for?
  7. 0
    wait, you are 25, you have already been through an LPN program and a BSN program, and you have 2/2 years experience as a RN in those areas? When did you graduate HS and where you bc that seems damn near impossible... I live just over the MA boarder, and our LPN programs are about 10 months full time, BS is 4 years full time, and you must have worked for a year as an LPN? Is your birthday tomorrow or something?
  8. 0
    You are a competitive candidate. I had a similar background when I applied to the DNP program at the university if Utah. I will graduate May 2013. Good luck.
  9. 0
    I don't think its impossible depending on what LPN program he went through. I graduated from high school at age 17 (turned 18 that summer in July), graduated with my BSN at the age of 21 (turned 22 that summer in July). And with God's help I will graduate from my full time FNP program at the age of 24 (will turn 25 that summer in July). Depending on how far the poster is into the age 25, I don't see his stats being impossible. I'll have been a nurse for three years once I finish the program and I was a CNA four years while completing college (2007-2011). I obtained my CNA license in high school though but if he is only starting FNP at the age of 25, I think time adds up correctly.
  10. 0
    I stand corrected... I too obtained CNA in HS, went on to major in Nursing, but took the LPN NCLEX Challenge exam, so I became an LPN without going to LPN school, its a loop hole in NH. I too became an BSN RN at 21. I guess I am, like many others who pm'd me, irritated that something so obvious was posted.... I stand behind the fact he should wait and do the ENP program that schools are working out, PC is going to bore him to death... And, for example, I am awaiting decisions from BSN-DNP programs as we speak, I was Salutatorian, but I never felt it necessary to post that when I posted about anxiety r/t admissions.... bc, I know inside, that makes me competitive. Certainly on my essay to the school I highlighted stuff to make me shine bright, but thats bc your suppose to.
    I gotta tell you, I am impressed, you are very accomplished! I was sorta in your shoes... that is exactly what my plan was (im 10 yrs older than you tho, so this would be ten years ago that I was on the same path you are on.) Personally, now that I am older, I am SO glad I did not go for FNP, which was my original goal... But, if you know your area, you know your area... I, ultimately, am in the exact opposite specialty than I anticipated, and as an FNP I would not be able to go forward with my plans. I thought, SICU and ER forever, and at that time FNP was ok for working in the ER.... But after starting school, I realized how specific I was making myself (well, FNP is broad, so I guess you have the most options) but from my first day at a new per diem job that I took to help fund my partner and I's quest to have a baby- I switched to Psych and loved it... and the experience of Assisted Reproduction has pushed me to want to combine these two areas... So, I am now awaiting decisions for BSN-DNP dual specialty WHNP and FPMHNP.... the last areas I ever thought id be in!
    Oh, and seriously- good for you, It is always nice to see a colleague do as well as you have, if you in the New England area, let me know, bc I just moved and need to find a new PCP....
  11. 0
    You have the right GPA and experiences to be competitive. For the University of Utah I know they also require an Advanced Physiology course that you would want to take. I think the essay you are required to fill out with your application is the main thing you would want to focus on. University of Utah wants you to have a no doubt decision on what you want to do with that particular certification. FNP going into family practice, ACNP going to work in ICU or trauma.

    Iíll go off on the dual role soapbox. There were some other very good points about waiting for Emergency Nurse practitioner curriculum to start, if you are wanting to work in the ED as a Nurse Practitioner. Iíd like to do Nurse Practitioner in an ED, and have been struggling to understand the best option to take. Most EDís hire FNPís at the moment, but the best option thus far is to become dual certified as an FNP and ACNP, and the amount of colleges that offer that are few and far between. Many offer Post Masters programs to obtain another certification but they usually add at least another year if not two. Iíve asked the University of Utah about a dual certification option there, and they informed me that the programs are three years each, no shortcuts.

    Itís always best to apply to more programs and pick from the ones you are accepted into. If you want to add other highlights to your application add some certifications if you donít have them, or possibly try to get some instructor certifications. ACLS and PALS instructor look good on any application. Or get your CEN if you donít have it. Study two weeks and take the test, any cert. that you have that other applicants donít will make you stand out further.


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